Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Buy 680 gtx now or wait

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
March 27, 2012 2:23:52 PM

Hi i am realy looking to buy a Asus 680 gtx card since release last week, but i am having truble deciding between waiting fro a DCUII version and dont know ETA on its release since the card is so new.

should i wait 1-2 weeks before buying and hope for non reff cards to be out maybe with more Vrm. :bounce: 


gonna play BF 3, Diablo 3, wow, SC2 and a few ether games at 1080p on single screen

need advice aiter to wait or cash in now :ange: 

system

asus maximus gene-z gen3
I5 2500k 4,3 ghz
stock cooler (i know its bad bios update screwed with Vcore to 1,48v so did fast oc to get to 1,3)
8 Gb corsair vengance ddr 3 1600mhz
700W corsair gs gaming psu
ye old faithfull 8800 gtx 7xx Mb (only baked 1 time to revive lol)
27" philips 1080p screen


More about : buy 680 gtx wait

a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 2:29:58 PM

Every 680 i found was sold out or up priced to like $600. You might have no choice but to wait.
Related resources
March 27, 2012 2:30:51 PM

atm im thinking the same thing may soon RIP 5 years of good use. but still hard to decide since i want to play some new games :D 
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 2:40:32 PM

I missed the "only baked one time". That’s awesome. I have a BFG 8800gtx that came with a life time warranty. The logo on the card is some guy holding his head. I always thought that strange. Any way the card died like 2 days after BFG stopped honoring their GPU warranties. I thought, now I know why that dude is holding his head, his $500 video card burned out and the life time warranty is no good.

Any way that card is now twice baked and running strong. First time went about a year second time is about 9 months now.
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 2:48:12 PM

Sorry if this is derailing the topic, but what does baking actually do? I've heard stories but never fully understood why putting hardware in the oven would be a good idea. ;-)

And yes I've also burned out an 8800gt, warrenty covered it though.
March 27, 2012 2:50:13 PM

Nice :D  borrowed my stepfarthers old 9800 gtx 512mb after he upgraded, was using it to test a friends new build while doing mine during his post beep (on que btw) it sent out the mysterius blue smoke :na: 
we went NOOOO looked at my old pc and took ye old faithfull 8800 gtx back into service again :D 
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 2:55:04 PM

I think waiting for the 680 would be wise, I don't like buying the 1st production run of anything. At least wait and see what the next release brings.
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 2:56:44 PM

Hello,

Apparently "baking" somehow reconnects the solders that were done. However - it is highly dangerous and not reccomended. The toxic fumes that can come out of a GPU can be harmful - as well you should really clean your oven if you did do it. However even cleaning the oven would not completely get rid of the toxic fumes.


Here is a link:
http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1421792

I don't reccomend people do it on a regular basis...just for the dangerousness itself.
March 27, 2012 2:57:53 PM

it melts the soldering so it once again has conection
over time some soldering on electronics looses the abillity to transfer current trough it (micro fractures)



quick Guide what i did (use at own risk)

½ . set oven to 200 celcius no fans ussage in oven (blowing air can blow off parts)

1. remove heatsink & fans plastik cover etc.

2. remove thermal paste

3. put card on tinfoil covered pan and have it lvl use tinfoil balls dont let it tuch any soldering

4. place in oven 10-12 mins

5 . let it cool off nice and slow in room temp

6. out it back together with new thermal paste



March 27, 2012 3:01:06 PM

like chainsaw said not recomended
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 3:20:43 PM

Why not recommended I mean if you have a non working card nothing to loose... If your worried about the fumes LOLz... I baked a metiorite in my oven one time bet I'm a gonner.. LOL no really I found one and they said to bake it to get the moisture out so it won't rust :/ 

Thent
a b U Graphics card
March 27, 2012 3:22:17 PM

Never bake anything with plastic wrapped capacitors. They will pop releasing brown goo and noxius fumes. I learned the hard way. Baking cards with metal caps works fine.

There is a youtube video somewhere of a guy in some sort of lab baking a card under a microscope, You can watch the broken soder points melt and flow back together. I have successfully baked 3 8800 series cards. A 7600 with plastc caps filled my house with smoke, and caught me a beating from my wife. And an old ati9700 pro agp had no change.
March 27, 2012 3:24:24 PM

raise hands if you had a small mad scientist inside you with big evile laugh after baking first card :D 

/hands up
:D 
March 27, 2012 3:44:34 PM

Eye dinner is served once again :sol: 
March 27, 2012 3:58:03 PM

I think the price is not the best time to buy, keep waiting, Patience guy can get more benefits
March 27, 2012 4:01:49 PM

here in Denmark the prices are screwed up 700$ give and take 40$ early adopter tax? :na: 
Anonymous
April 24, 2013 5:50:55 AM

Max1s said:
Sorry if this is derailing the topic, but what does baking actually do? I've heard stories but never fully understood why putting hardware in the oven would be a good idea. ;-)

And yes I've also burned out an 8800gt, warrenty covered it though.


Like other posters have said, it is known to reconnect solder joints that may have been severed due to stress or heat or both. I've read of numerous cases of people putting Xbox 360s in ovens and a few cases of PS3s. For the most part this is a temporary fix. One key step that many people don't even know about when attempting the "baking" aka re-flow process is applying liquid flux to the solder before heating it up. Simply baking the board will not do much, but some people do get lucky and get the device working again. Most just waste a few hours baking an electronic device. The only way to make sure it works is to put the liquid flux on. Flux is basically solder material mixed with liquid. When the liquid evaporates or is heated up then cooled, the flux fills in the gaps where the solder was sheared. You can buy bottles of flux or look up how to make your own. Also, it is highly recommended that you use a proper heat gun instead of an oven intended for food. With a heat gun, you can concentrate the heat on the specific area, usually the GPU chip, and not have to worry about damaging other sensitive parts of the device such as capacitors or any plastic pieces such as the inside of the HDMI connector.
Anonymous
April 24, 2013 7:13:28 AM

lostcard said:


gonna play BF 3, Diablo 3, wow, SC2 and a few ether games at 1080p on single screen



Based on rumors, the next card will have the same die size of 28nm as the current card. They will both have the same bus size. They will both have the same 2 or 4GB DDR5 VRAM. They will both be based on the same Kepler architecture. The only difference, it seems, is CUDA cores and ROPs. This will result in a modest 10-15% performance increase. With the games you are going to be playing, the GTX 680 is more than enough, maybe even overkill considering you are using a single 1080p monitor. The real "next-gen" GPUs come out when they release the "Maxwell" architecture. You'll have to wait at least another year before you can get that. For now, the GTX 680 4GB should be king 9(among single chip cards at least) assuming that the 780 is only available in 2GB when it is first released.
Anonymous
April 24, 2013 7:13:49 AM

lostcard said:


gonna play BF 3, Diablo 3, wow, SC2 and a few ether games at 1080p on single screen



Based on rumors, the next card will have the same die size of 28nm as the current card. They will both have the same bus size. They will both have the same 2 or 4GB DDR5 VRAM. They will both be based on the same Kepler architecture. The only difference, it seems, is CUDA cores and ROPs. This will result in a modest 10-15% performance increase. With the games you are going to be playing, the GTX 680 is more than enough, maybe even overkill considering you are using a single 1080p monitor. The real "next-gen" GPUs come out when they release the "Maxwell" architecture. You'll have to wait at least another year before you can get that. For now, the GTX 680 4GB should be king (among single chip cards at least) assuming that the 780 is only available in 2GB when it is first released.
a b U Graphics card
April 24, 2013 7:52:54 AM

I would wait till the 700s drop then make a decision..This way if you dont like you can make a return and go to the 660s or if you get the 660s and you dont like you can go 700s.. Either or i would wait it out more options atleast.
a b U Graphics card
April 24, 2013 8:34:13 AM

You guys do know this thread is over a year old right?
!