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Can i go with 850 power supply unit?

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Last response: in Components
September 24, 2012 5:03:39 AM

Hello, recently i have bought a very nice rig,after putting it together my power supply unit failed. Now thing is i cannot return it since i wont be in USA for another year. And i would like to know if i can go with 850 power supply unit? This is my configuration :

1. Motherboard : Assus P8Z77-V PREMIUM
2. 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 670 SuperClocked 4096MB GDDR5, 2x Dual-Link DVI, HDMI, DP, 4-Way SLI Ready Graphics Card
3. CORSAIR CMZ32GX3M4X1600C10 (Ver2.2)(XMP) 32GB ( 4x 8GB )
4. Western Digital Caviar Black 1 TB SATA III 7200 RPM 64 MB Cache Internal Desktop Hard Drive Bulk/OEM - WD1002FAEX
5. SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-7PC128B/WW
6. Seasonic SS-1050XM ATX 1050 Power Supply - Not working
7. Intel Core i7-3770K BX80667i73770K Processor - Quad Core, 8MB L3 Cache, 3.50GHz (3.90GHz Max Turbo), Socket H2 (LGA1155)
8. Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler with 120mm

So this is the current configuration,can i go with 850 or i need to use 1050? Thank you very much

More about : 850 power supply unit

September 24, 2012 5:14:04 AM

850w will be fine, just make sure you use quality psu, not some cheap that will fail if running on spec
Related resources
a c 111 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 6:57:01 AM

dodger46 said:
Purely for my own education, (I have to resort to calculators) how did you arrive at 750? I rely on the Asus one and it reckons 900W, couldn't match the i7 exactly, but suspect no great difference with the iGPU as it won't be used.

http://prntscr.com/g4ikf


GTX 670 only draws roughly 330W, which leaves 420W for the CPU etc.
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 7:01:00 AM

the gtx 670 170 watt card at maximum load which will be 170 x 2 is 340 watts at 100% maximum load but you wont reach those numbers unlesss your beching si your gaming load will be around 280-300 watts which gives you plenty of headroom with even a 650 watt psu
a c 111 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 7:06:42 AM

Problem is most 650W PSU's don't provide enough PCIE connectors.
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 7:57:11 AM

Yebbut, he has Sli'd 2 x GTX 670 4096 ,does that double the consumption up to 680W??

2. 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 670 SuperClocked 4096MB GDDR5, 2x Dual-Link DVI, HDMI, DP, 4-Way SLI Ready Graphics Card
a c 111 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 8:02:37 AM

No.

He says he wants 2 of the EVGA GTX 670 SC 4GB cards. As shown in the graph SLI GTX 670 (meaning there are 2 cards) draws around 340W, again this doesn't simulate real world usage.
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 8:03:26 AM

dodger46 said:
Yebbut, he has Sli'd 2 x GTX 670 4096 ,does that double the consumption up to 680W??

2. 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 670 SuperClocked 4096MB GDDR5, 2x Dual-Link DVI, HDMI, DP, 4-Way SLI Ready Graphics Card


hardly,memory wattage in minuscule the real power consumption hog on a graphics car is the processor so you can stick a as much vram on it as you can and power consumption will hardly increase

a good 850 will run 3 670's
a c 374 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 8:17:09 AM

dodger46 said:
Yebbut, he has Sli'd 2 x GTX 670 4096 ,does that double the consumption up to 680W??

2. 2x EVGA GeForce GTX 670 SuperClocked 4096MB GDDR5, 2x Dual-Link DVI, HDMI, DP, 4-Way SLI Ready Graphics Card



No. More VRAM does not increase the power consumption.

Edit: That's what I get for having multiple tabs open. :p  Beat to it!
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 8:56:54 AM

Ah! So if there was a 670 on amuffin's chart with 4096 Gb it would ony consume around the same as a 2048, thus 2 in Sli about 340W. The Asus calculator way out then, as it recommends extra 600W for 2 x 670s.
September 24, 2012 9:20:47 AM

If they get overclocked, they could push the limits of their peg slots and pcie connectors(225w each). Still, that's only 450w. If the 3770K(77w) gets over-
clocked, it will use more power too(maybe about 100w total). Thats 550w and the vast majority of pull in the system. Still(as mentioned), they won't pull
anywhere near those wattages(not even if you ran say prime95 and Furmark at the same time, let alone while gaming). I am concerned about the
number of amps(A) on the +12v rail(s), how they are distributed with what max +12v draw(if multiple +12v rails), and the brand/model psu(for quality).
Some shoddy units can't deliver more than 50% of their rating without burning up.
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 9:47:05 AM

jtenorj said:
If they get overclocked, they could push the limits of their peg slots and pcie connectors(225w each). Still, that's only 450w. If the 3770K(77w) gets over-
clocked, it will use more power too(maybe about 100w total). Thats 550w and the vast majority of pull in the system. Still(as mentioned), they won't pull
anywhere near those wattages(not even if you ran say prime95 and Furmark at the same time, let alone while gaming). I am concerned about the
number of amps(A) on the +12v rail(s), how they are distributed with what max +12v draw(if multiple +12v rails), and the brand/model psu(for quality).
Some shoddy units can't deliver more than 50% of their rating without burning up.

I'm hoping the OP is in the UK, I have a Corsair TX850 V2 for sale which I bought in error thinking a Hiper 590 was insufficient for a rig which turned out to have a faulty Mobo... the Corsair claims 70A/840W on the 12V rail. So, Boris, I sent you a PM which may be to your advantage if you're in the UK...
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 1:26:56 PM

jtenorj said:
If they get overclocked, they could push the limits of their peg slots and pcie connectors(225w each). Still, that's only 450w. If the 3770K(77w) gets over-
clocked, it will use more power too(maybe about 100w total). Thats 550w and the vast majority of pull in the system. Still(as mentioned), they won't pull
anywhere near those wattages(not even if you ran say prime95 and Furmark at the same time, let alone while gaming). I am concerned about the
number of amps(A) on the +12v rail(s), how they are distributed with what max +12v draw(if multiple +12v rails), and the brand/model psu(for quality).
Some shoddy units can't deliver more than 50% of their rating without burning up.


pcie connectors cant limit a cards power
September 24, 2012 4:47:25 PM

obsidian86 said:
pcie connectors cant limit a cards power


I mean you can't draw more power than the peg slot(75w) and pcie connectors(75w for 6pin, 150w for 8pin/6+2pin) provide, which can limit overclocking.

http://hardocp.com/article/2012/09/19/asus_geforce_gtx_...

Read this very recent article at hardocp and tell me if you can repeat the sentence you just posted.

Oh, yeah. The hd5970 was specced better than 2 hd5850s but ran slower. The reason is because it ran out of power on the 300 watts(PEG slot,6pin,8pin)
that amd provided the card with in many cases(more graphically intense games)due to downclocking to fit in the limited tdp. That card was top dog for
about a year but was really kind of wrong(matched by even slower gtx460 sli and hd6850 crossfire setups). A little history lesson for those unaware.
Of course if you read tom's monthly gpu buyer's guide, you know 2 hd6870 and 2 gtx560 are faster than gtx580(which is same as hd5970). Just sayin'.

Edit: btw, hd6870 is as fast as or faster than hd5850, and gtx560 is like an overclocked gtx460 1GB(original version) if you didn't already know.
September 24, 2012 6:07:47 PM

Some power supplies have multiple pcie connectors (6pin 75w each, 8pin/6+2pin 150w/75w+75w) because they are designed to deliver that much power.
When you set out to circumvent standards, you risk losing your gpu, mobo, psu, and other parts without EXTREME cooling measures. Did you even bother
to read all of what you just linked? If the op wants to use their system like the vast majority of other people do, the data you linked is irrelevant.
a c 244 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 6:16:52 PM

jtenorj said:
Some power supplies have multiple pcie connectors (6pin 75w each, 8pin/6+2pin 150w/75w+75w) because they are designed to deliver that much power.
When you set out to circumvent standards, you risk losing your gpu, mobo, psu, and other parts without EXTREME cooling measures. Did you even bother
to read all of what you just linked? If the op wants to use their system like the vast majority of other people do, the data you linked is irrelevant.

It points to your theory of not being able to to pull more power than what is available according to PCIe specifications, completely relevant
September 24, 2012 6:34:19 PM

By doing those modifications, you are going out of pcie spec, which changes the relevance. I know the wires can deliver more power(exactly how much power
depends on the quality of wiring in question ). Did you read the "When you set out to circumvent standards" part of my last post?
a b ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 6:49:52 PM

jtenorj said:
By doing those modifications, you are going out of pcie spec, which changes the relevance. I know the wires can deliver more power(exactly how much power
depends on the quality of wiring in question ). Did you read the "When you set out to circumvent standards" part of my last post?

this was a great help

http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7212
a c 244 ) Power supply
September 24, 2012 6:55:51 PM

jtenorj said:
By doing those modifications, you are going out of pcie spec, which changes the relevance. I know the wires can deliver more power(exactly how much power
depends on the quality of wiring in question ). Did you read the "When you set out to circumvent standards" part of my last post?

Your problem is you believe the PCI-SIG specification to be the end all of power distribution for video cards.
They are thier own entity, making specifications as they see fit, not according to what can actually be provided.
18 gauge stranded wire is rated for 6 amps at 12v ( over a distance of 15 ft. ), pcie terminals are rated for 8 amps at 12v, the only standard that would be circumvented is the one laid forth by PCI-SIG

Oops, to slow again
September 24, 2012 7:12:42 PM

Still, the cooling system on a card is only designed to deal with so many watts worth of heat while letting the gpu operate at temps safe for its long term
survival. If you want to push past the boundaries of a card in its delivered form, you need better cooling like an aftermarket air cooler or a waterblock.

Many custom coolers on cards are already better than amd or nvidia reference designs, and using liquid cooling can potentially introduce system killing
leaks into the mix. There's also pump failure and radiator fan failure to consider(if you get a card with 2 or more fans and one fails, you still have x fans).