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Upgrades for my computer

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May 30, 2012 11:22:17 PM

So I currently build a budget gaming computer awhile back, put it all together, was my first computer, spent around $950 with the addition of a keyboard, mouse, mousepad, and a new headset.

The computer itself is composed of these parts:


Now I am looking for upgrades for any of the parts, looking mainly at a mobo/CPU upgrade because my mobo's SATA cables are really painful because my GPU is big that it sits basically on top of my SATA ports making it a pain to plug in SATA stuff.

So with the upgrade of a mobo I want a CPU upgrade, not looking for anything too crazy, just want a better mobo with a better CPU. Might look into overclocking the CPU but I have no experience:

Current mobo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Current CPU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Is there any real need for an upgrade? I'm not having performance issues, I just want something faster (CPU wise and a better mobo if possible).

More about : upgrades computer

a b B Homebuilt system
May 31, 2012 4:55:03 AM

Hmm... do you still not want to OC? Its just that if you don't plan to, IB performance gains is only minimal. I think you should just wait for the next generation of CPU's (Haswell is what its called). It should come out somewhat soon (not really sure) since Ivy Bridge is the last generation with the LGA 1155 socket.

If you can't wait, i5-3550 and H77 MoBo for no OC (remember minimal performance gains with this choice).

The better option would be to get an i5-3570k and a z77 MoBo. Then you can OC and stretch the performance gains.
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June 2, 2012 1:23:10 AM

Would it require additional cooling (buying more fans to install) so maintain a good temp with the option of an i5-3570k and a z77 mobo for cooling?
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a b B Homebuilt system
June 2, 2012 6:06:54 AM

If you are going to Overclock, you will need an aftermarket CPU cooler. The most popular one is Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO for like 30 bucks. You don't necessarily need extra case fans.
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June 4, 2012 5:42:24 AM

What would be a good mobo with that i5-3570k and the current other parts I have right now?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a c 78 à CPUs
June 4, 2012 6:09:55 AM

I don't understand why you'd want to upgrade that system, yes I read your thread, but honestly all I can say is I wish I had that kind of money to spend on a CPU upgrade I didn't need. You're throwing a way a 190 dollar CPU when its perfectly fine, now the mobo I can go along with, its pretty cheap. but I would leave the CPU alone.
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a b B Homebuilt system
June 4, 2012 10:59:36 AM

gigabyte z77x-ud3h or asrock z77 extreme 4
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June 5, 2012 2:30:52 AM

nekulturny said:
I don't understand why you'd want to upgrade that system, yes I read your thread, but honestly all I can say is I wish I had that kind of money to spend on a CPU upgrade I didn't need. You're throwing a way a 190 dollar CPU when its perfectly fine, now the mobo I can go along with, its pretty cheap. but I would leave the CPU alone.


I mean the CPU is fine, I'm just not sure if I would be happy with the performance once I OC it, the mobo I'm definitely upgrading as the SATA cable location is just awful.

Any advice for an OC on this CPU? I will see if I like it better OC'd.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a c 78 à CPUs
June 5, 2012 2:39:54 AM

My advice would to not overclock an i5-2400. It overclocks itself (thats what the TurboBoost is) slightly when it sees it needs a little more juice.

There are 2 ways to overclock a CPU, at the reference clock and the multiplier. With Intels the "K" at the end of the model number denotes that the multiplier is unlocked (meaning it can be increased), the final clock speed of your CPU is determined by the reference clock x the multiplier. For example if your reference clock is 200mhz and your multiplier is 18 that means your clock speed is 3.6GHZ.

The problem with Sandy/Ivy Bridge CPUs is they have very little tolerance for overclocking at the reference clock. My advice would be to not fool with it at all, as even the slightest bump on it will net you very little performance gains and could possibly render the system unstable. (There are technical reasons why the Intel CPUs are so sensitive to this but I'm trying to keep it simple)

Even so, I just couldn't see throwing away an i5-2400 you already have for a 2500k or 3570K. Yes they can overclock, but is there really anything you're actually trying to do on your computer that the 2400 isn't doing for you already? What exactly are you doing now that you feel could be done faster? If you have the money go for it I guess, I just don't really think its worth it.

I'm with you on the motherboard at least, thats a pretty chinsy board.
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June 5, 2012 3:23:45 AM

Might as well wait for the next gen of processors to come out then?

Mainly it's the loading speed on some games, maybe it's because I leave my computer on frequently but a friend with an i5-2500k loads a league game 4x quicker then I can.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a c 78 à CPUs
June 5, 2012 3:45:23 AM

Does your friend have an SSD drive? That could explain it.

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June 10, 2012 3:17:18 AM

Does an SSD increase the speed of a computer? I'm kind of a computer noob, was my first build and didn't get an SSD because I thought it was kinda pointless if I already have a HDD.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a c 78 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 3:35:58 AM

An SSD is basically a hard drive made out of the same type of memory USB flash drives are made out of. A traditional hard drive as I'm sure you know is composed of metal disks that are read by read/write heads (google a picture of the inside of a hard drive if you've never seen one). The SSD is substantially faster than a traditional hard drive as it has no moving parts and less seek time.

SSDs are substantially faster in loading large files (such as games) when you load up a level for example. It will load much faster. When you boot up the Computer Windows7 will load up faster.

I wouldnt say they are pointless, but I will say they're purely a luxury item, as the price per gigabyte is substantially higher than traditional hard drives, and lets face it, whats so important going on in your life that you can't wait an extra 15 seconds for the next act of Modern Warfare to load?

It is said that SSDs are more reliable than traditional hard drives due to their lack of moving parts, however I find this somewhat subjective as it is fairly rare for traditional hard drives to fail in the first place.
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