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Which Parts Should I Keep and What Should I Get?

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May 30, 2012 12:39:28 PM



I have just ordered a Intel 3930K CPU and the Intel BXRTS2011LC High Performance Liquid Cooler. I also ordered a Aerocool V12XT Touch Panel Fan Controller and six Coolermaster fans for my Storm Trooper case.

I am looking for some advice on which components I should keep from my previous build and what I should replace. I havent ordered a motherboard for my Sandybridge-E yet either. Also loking for advice on which graphics cards I should go with.

I am currently using 2 Asus 1080P monitors at full resolution ad also a Sharp Aquos Quattro 60 inch TV. My GTX 580 isnt powering it as good as I would like so I plan on going either SLI or Crossfire on my board with either a Nvidia GTX 6 Series or AMD Seven Series and do not plan to overclock at all whatsoever unless I am unlocking some hidden potential to make some serious gains in performance.

I use my machine for gaming , music and video production (as a hobby) and some 3D rendering for my job (on the occasions I need to do some after work problem solving).

Here is what I am rocking right now and in brackets what I have purchased already)

-i7 980x @ 4.01 Ghz (I7 3930K CPU)
Stock Cooler (Intel BXRTS2011LC Liquid Cooler)
-ASUS P6T Deluxe V2
-G-Skill Trident 12GB DDR-3 2000mhz with cooling fans
-EVGA GeForce GTX 580(Fermi) (Will be selling it for $280)
-120Gb Corsair Force GT SSD
-(2x)Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB 7200 RPM (I will probably swap my single WD Caviar Black 1TB into this new rig)
-Corsair HX1000 PSU
Samsung DVD Rw 22x
-Coolermaster Storm Trooper
-2X ASUS VH236H Black 23 Monitor
-Sharp AQUOS Quattron 60"(LC60LE830U)

Any help would greatly be appreciated.

More about : parts

a b B Homebuilt system
May 30, 2012 2:22:49 PM

I actually just did something similar. I went from an i7-960 to a 3930K (see sig). I just swapped out the board, CPU and cooler (of course this requires taking the whole thing apart). I used everything from my X58 system.

I had my 2 680s prior to the upgrade, but two 580s worked great in my X58 config before I replaced them, too.

I'm pleased with the ASUS P9X79 Pro board I'm using as it has everything I realistically need and use in a board. It has the right amount of USB and SATA connections and I like the arrangement of the PCIe expansion slots where a 2-way SLI setup has you dropping the cards well separated from each other. This helps keep the temps of the GPUs down.

After the initial boot, Windows 7 recognized the hardware change and required a restart. I was able to install the new chipset drivers and all without a fresh Windows install. Totally painless and easy upgrade. Because Windows 7 does recognize the change, it required a click on Windows 'Activate' under Computer properties, 'Activate' in Office 2010 and nothing more.

I've since upgraded to a 16GB RAM kit, but I've really been able to make due with everything else from my previous system.

My recommendation to you is just upgrade the motherboard and CPU and keep everything else. If you want to upgrade the video, I definitely like the 680s and they work great.
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a c 104 B Homebuilt system
May 30, 2012 8:50:09 PM

^+1 I would get a 4 stick (quad channel) memory kit as well and get rid of your triple channel kit!
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May 30, 2012 10:02:22 PM

rolli59 said:
^+1 I would get a 4 stick (quad channel) memory kit as well and get rid of your triple channel kit!




I was wondering about the ram. I have been told by numerous sources in the computer biz that "Dual" Tri" and "Quad" channel is really more of a marketing ploy and that my ram is plenty fast enough to be used. How do you guys feel about that?

I have no issues spending the money of more ram as cash really isn't the issue. Trident ram is pretty damn fast but if Quad Channel is really going to up my performance I am willing to do it.


I was going to keep the harddrives as they are a few weeks old. The PSU is 3 years old would a HX 1050 be worth the upgrade? Is it more efficient and does it run cooler?

I like the motherboard. I looked up the specs and looks like the type of board I would like especially the space between GPU's.


Which brand should I go with if I decide to go with ATI/AMD GPU's? I will go with EVGA if I get some 680's or a 690 (If I can find one).
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a c 104 B Homebuilt system
May 30, 2012 11:20:00 PM

The PSU is still going to handle it fine. On the ram it is a hype in a sense but there are applications that benefit from it http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1779/5/
On AMD (ATI) GPU's Asus and MSI are popular brands.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 31, 2012 9:21:32 AM

packerbacker28 said:
I was wondering about the ram. I have been told by numerous sources in the computer biz that "Dual" Tri" and "Quad" channel is really more of a marketing ploy and that my ram is plenty fast enough to be used. How do you guys feel about that?

I have no issues spending the money of more ram as cash really isn't the issue. Trident ram is pretty damn fast but if Quad Channel is really going to up my performance I am willing to do it.


I was going to keep the harddrives as they are a few weeks old. The PSU is 3 years old would a HX 1050 be worth the upgrade? Is it more efficient and does it run cooler?

I like the motherboard. I looked up the specs and looks like the type of board I would like especially the space between GPU's.


Which brand should I go with if I decide to go with ATI/AMD GPU's? I will go with EVGA if I get some 680's or a 690 (If I can find one).

You could actually re-use the RAM you have in full quad channel if you are running with 6x2GB (this is what I had in my X58) and just take away 2 modules leaving 4x2GB for the new motherboard. Then you would have quad channel with 8GB of RAM. If you are running 3x4GB, I'd get a new kit for sure so you can take advantage of the bandwidth of the quad-channel either way. Since you're doing video production and money isn't an issue, I'd pick up a 4x4 or 4x8 kit. Since the new architecture includes it, why not take full advantage of the quad-channel bandwidth?

That PSU is still under warranty. I would continue to use for two more years until the warranty is up. This is why you bought a quality PSU in the first place. It's backed by the company for 5 years and gives you the power you need for expansion and future builds.

If it were me, I'd wait it out with the 680s or 690. EVGA.com has some 680 SC editions available, but they have a 1-card per household limit for each model. The way around this is to get the 680 SC model with the backplate and one without which are both priced at $529 currently. I'd even go so far as to recommend a second 580 for now at a reduced price if you want more graphics power just to avoid crossfire driver issues.
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May 31, 2012 2:44:01 PM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Systems by Mousemonkey
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June 3, 2012 5:58:47 PM

I have just bought a Gigabyte G1 Assassin2. So far this is what I have to carry over..


3930K CPU
Gigabyte G1 Assassin2 X79
120GB Corsair Force GT SSD
1TB WD Black HDD
Corsair HX 1000 PSU
Samsung DVD/RW

I have decided to get rid of my tri-channel ram as this board only has 4 dims total. I should be able to get at least $400 for my 980x, mobo, ram. I still havent decided on what graphics to run. I definitely need to get more graphical power. What combination would be the fastest. Again money isnt really the first priority. That said I dont want to spend on something that doesnt really offer much more performance. I do still have my 580 but if there is a faster combination out there I want to hear it.
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