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Using an anti static wrist band

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June 1, 2012 12:00:35 PM

I am about to build a pc. In the past I have never used an anti static wrist band however this time I thought it would be a good idea. I bought one with a crockodile clip on the end. Where should I attach the clip? Would the inside of the case be fine? Does power supply need to be connected so that the case is grounded? There is a radiator that which has some exposed metal which I could attach it to.

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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:06:34 PM

you can connect it to any metal surface on the chasis but preferably to the chasis of the power supply. The 3 prong power cord will need to be plugged in for it to work however (but you can leave the PSU switch turned off)
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:06:50 PM

Attach the clip anywhere to the metal frame on the case. Pinhedd actually has the best answer. Ideally you want to attach it to a ground object. Once the PSU is mounted and plugged in, though, you can attach it to any part of metal frame of the case.
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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:10:06 PM

yeahhhh i never bothered to use one :D  all you have to do is attach it to some large metal object
June 1, 2012 12:12:41 PM

Pinhedd said:
you can connect it to any metal surface on the chasis but preferably to the chasis of the power supply. The 3 prong power cord will need to be plugged in for it to work however (but you can leave the PSU switch turned off)

Does it matter that the power supply is painted?
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:30:00 PM

Here's a good article on that whole thing:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/82184/avoid_static_damag...

Funny thing is, with most of my builds, I work on a plastic folding table in a de-humidified basement and have never had a problem with static damaging a component. Not saying it can't happen, but it is highly unlikely. I'm going to try to find the link, but there was an article by which one of the tech sites actually tried to determine how much static is required to kill a component. I know they practically had to taze the thing to get it to die.

But A+ says you should take the safety precautions...
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:31:55 PM

William Murphy said:
Does it matter that the power supply is painted?

Theoretically, the surface should be unpainted.
a c 134 ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:35:40 PM

I have never used one .... also never wear shoes / sneakers while building .... shoes and carpet are nice static electricity generator.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 12:58:51 PM

ubercake said:
Here's a good article on that whole thing:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/82184/avoid_static_damag...

Funny thing is, with most of my builds, I work on a plastic folding table in a de-humidified basement and have never had a problem with static damaging a component. Not saying it can't happen, but it is highly unlikely. I'm going to try to find the link, but there was an article by which one of the tech sites actually tried to determine how much static is required to kill a component. I know they practically had to taze the thing to get it to die.

But A+ says you should take the safety precautions...


All PC components are designed to be resistant to static discharge. You would have to actually try to damage it, causing damage by accident is extremely unlikely. As long as you don't rub it all over a housecat the chances of it getting damaged during construction are slim to none (and that would be due to a pissed off cat, not just static). Reasonable precautions also include not building it on a shag carpet, in a wind tunnel or in the vicinity of a nuclear blast. Honestly, if a component gets damaged from a low amount of ESD there was probably something else wrong with it to begin with.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 1:14:26 PM

Agreed.
June 1, 2012 1:16:02 PM

The entire ball game with anti-static is creating a consistent ground plane with all surfaces; if you hook everything up, via clips, or what-have-you to the wall ground from a 3-pronged outlet, you are good to go. When combined with an anti-static mat as a basis, this is about as foolproof as you can get without willful negligence.

However, I’ve never done this while doing a home build. I’ve just touch the chassis (provided its metal) every time I come back to handling components, and leave them in their anti-static bags until I’m ready to use them. Handling the components in a mindful way, as in not explicitly touching bare pins unless necessary, goes a long way even in harsher-static environments… I just did my last build on a vinyl card-table over carpet, with no issue (YMMV).

But, if you are going the extra mile with a wrist band, focus on the heart of the issue; creating the ground plane upon which all work will be done, and making sure that after walking away, you re-introduce yourself to that plane prior to handling the components. Use anti-static bags when transferring components between planes, though I honestly don’t know if that actually helps … I’ve never really thought about it, nor had an issue with it, but all the pertinent components will normally come in them already, so it should be a non-issue.

Disclaimer: I do work in a facility where anti-static measures are part of the culture. In which, I’ve become lazy with the details (the rules and procedures to prevent such incidents are excessive, for obvious reasons). However, the extreme embarrassment, and general mockery that comes with faulting a component due to static shock keeps an air of mindfulness that may have seeped into my habits at home in an unconscious fashion.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:06:50 PM

Recently when I built my computer - while handling my GPU and CPU - I wore those yellow rubber dishwashing gloves. Guranteed no static.


Yes I looked ridiculous - but I wanted to protect my components.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:10:02 PM

Chainzsaw said:
Recently when I built my computer - while handling my GPU and CPU - I wore those yellow rubber dishwashing gloves. Guranteed no static.


Yes I looked ridiculous - but I wanted to protect my components.

How does a rubber balloon gather static, but rubber gloves do not?
June 1, 2012 2:14:14 PM

How come it says that a few people in this thread joined on the first of January 1970????
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:18:27 PM

ubercake said:
How does a rubber balloon gather static, but rubber gloves do not?


Err hmm just looked it up...I guess it was a bad idea lol.

IDK i swear there was less static when I was using one. Oh well, didn't ruin any of my components.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:22:42 PM

Chainzsaw said:
Err hmm just looked it up...I guess it was a bad idea lol.

IDK i swear there was less static when I was using one. Oh well, didn't ruin any of my components.

But you looked pretty sweet doing it! :) 
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:28:00 PM

ubercake said:
But you looked pretty sweet doing it! :) 


Actually digging deeper on this....it appears the rubber gloves do protect against static and actually keeps your body from discharging through your fingers. But as always - touch a large metal surface before doing so (which I did/was doing when I built my comp).

So...It looks like my way was fine. By the way - AFAIK the reason rubber balloons are so staticy is because of the large surface area of the balloon compared to the smaller surface area of the gloves.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:49:50 PM

ubercake said:
How does a rubber balloon gather static, but rubber gloves do not?


Because you have to rub the balloon against another material like hair to transfer the electrons. When your wearing rubber gloves...you shouldn't be doing that anyways. Not to mention they are fairly tight against the skin - so there should be no friction to transfer the electrons.

So when wearing rubber gloves and working on a computer:

Don't rub your hair vigerously like a balloon to hair.

Don't shuffle your feet.

Use your wrist to discharge any static with the gloves on (thats what I did).


As long as the precautions are taken - rubber gloves are fine.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 2:54:07 PM

So we can scrap the idea of using the wrist strap and just slap on some rubber gloves than, huh?
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 3:00:01 PM

ubercake said:
So we can scrap the idea of using the wrist strap and just slap on some rubber gloves than, huh?


Why would anyone want to scrap that idea? Wrist straps are good - I only used rubber gloves because I didn't have any straps.

I was merely suggesting another way to do it - i'm not here to disagree with you about anti-static wrist straps - they work well. In my case I just didn't have any, and rubber gloves are acceptable in my book as long as you follow the precautions.



I'm not here to argue with you - just trying to give some information on my experience.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 3:11:26 PM

Oh. Ok.
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 3:14:14 PM

ubercake said:
Oh. Ok.


TGIF man! Have a good one :bounce: 
June 1, 2012 3:29:40 PM

I have never EVER used gloves, wriststraps, or anything for that matter and have never had 1 single problem.

using yellow rubber gloves is completely unnecessary sally , just touch the chassis first and dont crush your ram sticks in your fist, lol
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 3:41:06 PM

jjb8675309 said:
I have never EVER used gloves, wriststraps, or anything for that matter and have never had 1 single problem.

using yellow rubber gloves is completely unnecessary sally , just touch the chassis first and dont crush your ram sticks in your fist, lol



Yes your sarcasm helps a lot. You don't even know the situation of some people. For me - when I built my computer I had a lot of static in the house so I definitely needed one of the two.

Keep calling people Sally, i'm sure it makes you feel like a man....i'm done with this thread :) 
June 1, 2012 3:54:48 PM

haha sorry to upset but honestly using gloves is unnecessary, I read the whole thread, dont cry

and yeah it did make me feel like a man ha, get a sense of humor
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2012 3:56:03 PM

So if I don't wear rubber gloves and call people sally, I won't have static?

I guess I'm really confused now.
!