Optimum format for filenames?

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
anything consistent!

In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
called Exceat could be renamed from
DSC0005.jpg to
2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
or
Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG

But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
2005-07-17-09-16-26
2005-07-17 09.16.26
05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
2005Jul17-16.26
2005Jul17-16.26
2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)

and more. What do others use please?

--
Terry, West Sussex, UK
34 answers Last reply
More about optimum format filenames
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell wrote:
    []
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?

    2005-03-20-1032-49

    Each image is also in a tree folder structure:

    \2005\
    \2005\03\
    \2005\03\20\
    \2005\03\20\2005-03-20-1032-49.jpg

    Dead easy to navigate, and keeps the number of images per folder down to a
    couple of hundred at most.

    Cheers,
    David
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    $number.$format for example 4312.jpeg. Other meta information is best
    mtained in exif or an in external database (but a given piece of info
    should be "owned" in one place only).

    Most file systems become progressively slower as files are added to a
    directory. Hence the need for directories each containing, say,
    at most 500 entries each. Hashing would a useful mechanism to map
    files to directories, for example, hash(4312.jpeg) -> 17/2/4312.jpeg
    (17 and 2 were here chosen randomly but would depend on your hash
    function). 2 levels would allow for 500^2 levels of files 250,000
    files. When you hit that limit you can rehash your files using
    3 levels (alternative decide what would be a reasonable large number and
    use that from the start).

    number is a plain sequence number and date searching can be implemented
    by binary search knowing the maximum number added so for. Say, you
    need 2005-3-18. You then look in hash(max/2) and see (file system, or
    meta data contained in file) is smaller than 2005-3-18. Depending on
    the result you repeat the search in either the 1st or 2nd half, or hit
    it right on the nail to begin with.

    If you have multiple streams of images, you want to serialize it into
    one when added to your archive. Searching probably breaks hence you
    want to use meta data, and an external database then becomes very
    useful (database means just a collection of information, could start out
    as a text file). Tree naming convention is not general enough, so
    meta-data probably needs the capability to tag multiple pieces of
    information on a given picture. For instance, subject for a picture
    could include: people, spring, water, family.

    Hope that helps?


    /Allan
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Hi Terry!
    This is the way I proceed:
    year, month, date, "underscore", title
    For example, 05-07-18_party-at-mikes
    This way, I know the date and the do. I can also upload directly without
    changing the title
    Marcel


    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?
    >
    > --
    > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    I leave the filename as it is from the camera. I dont believe in making the
    filename searchable.
    Instead I use EXIF/IPTC data, which can be embedded into the picturefile.
    This way I can use a lot more keywords, than there is room for in the
    filename. And I get a lot more flexibility when searching.
    Also the keywords and other info follows the picturefile.

    I use www.pixvue.com for adding EXIF/IPTC keywords/metadata and
    www.picasa.com as "photodatabase".
    In Picasa I can search for the keywords and other info in my picturefiles.

    regards


    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?
    >
    > --
    > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from

    << SNIP>

    > Terry, West Sussex, UK

    How long did it take to get to the coast and was it crowded ?

    Steve
    --
    Milk floats, stainless steel sinks...
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?
    >
    > --
    > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
    >
    One alternative out there over the past year has been indexing programs such
    as X1 and Copernick Desktop Search that index all H.D. files, emails and
    attachments, etc. I think these programs make having to use any type of
    sophisticated file-naming scheme largely unnecessary, beyond giving the
    jpeg, RAW, etc., a descriptive name that tells roughly what's there and
    approximately the date. These programs, because they maintain a "live"
    index, yield search results instanteously. Maybe EXIF is same functionally
    (live index??), I don't know. But I can tell you that all my Outlook emails
    are not kept in topical folders any longer at work.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    I was talking about a subdirectory of course.
    Pictures are either renamed (001, etc. , or left as is)
    Marcel


    "Celcius" <cosmar@rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:SpSdnewAA80fSUbfRVn-rA@rogers.com...
    > Hi Terry!
    > This is the way I proceed:
    > year, month, date, "underscore", title
    > For example, 05-07-18_party-at-mikes
    > This way, I know the date and the do. I can also upload directly without
    > changing the title
    > Marcel
    >
    >
    >
    > "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    > news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > > anything consistent!
    > >
    > > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > > DSC0005.jpg to
    > > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > > or
    > > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > >
    > > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    > >
    > > and more. What do others use please?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    > >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Allan Wind <allan_wind@lifeintegrity.com> wrote:

    >$number.$format for example 4312.jpeg. Other meta information is best
    >mtained in exif or an in external database (but a given piece of info
    >should be "owned" in one place only).
    >
    >Most file systems become progressively slower as files are added to a
    >directory. Hence the need for directories each containing, say,
    >at most 500 entries each. Hashing would a useful mechanism to map
    >files to directories, for example, hash(4312.jpeg) -> 17/2/4312.jpeg
    >(17 and 2 were here chosen randomly but would depend on your hash
    >function). 2 levels would allow for 500^2 levels of files 250,000
    >files. When you hit that limit you can rehash your files using
    >3 levels (alternative decide what would be a reasonable large number and
    >use that from the start).
    >
    >number is a plain sequence number and date searching can be implemented
    >by binary search knowing the maximum number added so for. Say, you
    >need 2005-3-18. You then look in hash(max/2) and see (file system, or
    >meta data contained in file) is smaller than 2005-3-18. Depending on
    >the result you repeat the search in either the 1st or 2nd half, or hit
    >it right on the nail to begin with.
    >
    >If you have multiple streams of images, you want to serialize it into
    >one when added to your archive. Searching probably breaks hence you
    >want to use meta data, and an external database then becomes very
    >useful (database means just a collection of information, could start out
    >as a text file). Tree naming convention is not general enough, so
    >meta-data probably needs the capability to tag multiple pieces of
    >information on a given picture. For instance, subject for a picture
    >could include: people, spring, water, family.
    >
    >Hope that helps?
    >
    >
    >/Allan

    Thanks, appreciate the detailed response, but I'm afraid it's largely
    over my head! You lost me on this 'hashing' stuff.

    Also, if I've understood the rest correctly, I'm afraid some sort of
    'meta' or serial number approach wouldn't suit me. I like my filenames
    to be inherently meaningful in *some* way, even if it's only the date
    and a word of text.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  9. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Morten L.Pedersen" <mlp@melped.dk> wrote:

    >"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    >news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    >> I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >> photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >> anything consistent!
    >>
    >I leave the filename as it is from the camera. I dont believe in making the
    >filename searchable.
    >Instead I use EXIF/IPTC data, which can be embedded into the picturefile.
    >This way I can use a lot more keywords, than there is room for in the
    >filename. And I get a lot more flexibility when searching.
    >Also the keywords and other info follows the picturefile.
    >
    >I use www.pixvue.com for adding EXIF/IPTC keywords/metadata and
    >www.picasa.com as "photodatabase".
    >In Picasa I can search for the keywords and other info in my picturefiles.

    Thanks, I'll take another look at both Picasa and pixvue.

    What do you with filenames for images that have no EXIF, such as from
    old scans?

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  10. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:

    >I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >anything consistent!

    In view of the somewhat complicated approaches mentioned here, I
    prefer my current system (having moved away from a more structured,
    somewhat encrypted system that I used for films and negs).

    Here is an example directory snippet:

    Set044_Mar_2005_Renaissance_Festival
    Set045_Mar_2005_St_Patrics_Day
    Set046_Mar_2005_Universal_Studios
    Set047_Apr_2005_Key_Lago_Dolphins
    Set048_Apr_2005_Loxahatchee
    Set049_Apr_2005_Sprinkler

    Set number represents a 1Gb or under CF card being filled. I usually
    empty the card after any 'major' event, create the set and name it
    accordingly. Underscores are optional of course, and this system
    allows you to use whatever date format you are happy with because the
    set-number keeps them in chronological order. One set will often
    contain photos taken over a number of days, and the descriptive tag I
    choose is one that best describes the majority of the photos.

    Inside, the DSC_NNNN.NEF files get renamed to the set number:

    048_0001.NEF
    048_0002.NEF
    048_0003.NEF

    and so on...., this keeps the filenames of the images unique, but
    still nice and small.

    Every few months I get around to making a small html based index in
    each set, for fast visual location of a particular file (using
    software that makes small thumbnails + 800x600 preview files, and
    exposes the EXIF data for each image).

    I'm too damn lazy to add EXIF descriptions for every shot or create
    some kind of database. Everything I print (using mpix.com) gets the
    filename printed on the back of the photo, which makes it easy to
    re-print if I need to.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  11. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Biker2 \(Threadstopper\)" <steve at pvl dot co dot uk> wrote:

    >
    >"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    >news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    >> I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >> photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >> anything consistent!
    >>
    >> In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    >> major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    >> For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    >> called Exceat could be renamed from
    >
    ><< SNIP>
    >
    >> Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
    >How long did it take to get to the coast and was it crowded ?
    >
    >Steve

    An hour from East Grinstead to Exceat, mainly on very busy A22,
    arriving at 10:00. Area was 'crowded' compared to a weekday in April,
    but spread out over the 9.5 miles we weren't tripping over other
    walkers <g>.


    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  12. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> writes:
    >I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >anything consistent!

    >What do others use please?

    I don't rename the image files at all. Too much work. Instead, I
    transfer them from the card using the free Breeze Downloader. I have it
    set up to read the date in the EXIF data and then store the images in
    individual folders for each date. The folders name pattern is
    "2005-07-18". Then I add an entry to a simple text file telling me the
    general subject of photos shot on that day.

    To find photos about a particular subject or place, searching the text
    file is fast. Then I use a browser like ACDSee or Irfanview to show me
    thumbnail images of all images in the folder. When I find a particular
    image, I can look at the EXIF info to tell me what time of day it was
    shot, as well as exposure conditions.

    So the date turns into the folder name, the time isn't used (but is
    stored in EXIF), and any comments are in the text file.

    Note that this method is for someone who "sorts" or looks for images
    infrequently than they transfer recent images, so it minimizes the
    amount of work done at the transfer stage. If I was a commercial
    photographer who wanted to be able to search for a particular image by
    keyword, I'd probably maintain a database of them. But I'm not.

    Dave
  13. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    >I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >anything consistent!

    I think you're best bet is to make heavy use of subdirectories. I use
    a different subdir for each event, so it's easy to find the photos.

    But if you're going to name each photo individually, why not put lots
    of information in the name? After all, Windows will look for subparts
    of a file name. If you have something like
    "July14,2004:RiverInMaineWithFishInTheStream.jpg" you should be able
    to find it"

    As for dates, I've always found that spelling out the month is the
    best way to go.

    -Joel

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  14. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?
    >
    > --
    > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
    I use month-day-year-image sequence number. I also have an Excel
    spreadsheet which gives more information including a thumbnail. Just use a
    format which you understand.
    Jim
  15. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    I guess it depends upon how many photos you take. I take drga racing and
    family photos, not commercial.
    I store my photos in folders with the date they were taken.
    I then browse the new directories with IrfanView thumbnails to determine
    what was taken on each date. I then make a brief note of what is each
    directory in a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet has a different page for each
    year and the entries are in date order.

    --
    remove n u m b e r s to reply
    Terry Pinnell wrote in message ...
    >I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    >photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    >anything consistent!
    >
    >In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    >major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    >For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    >called Exceat could be renamed from
    >DSC0005.jpg to
    >2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >or
    >Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    >But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    >there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    >2005-07-17-09-16-26
    >2005-07-17 09.16.26
    >05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    >2005Jul17-16.26
    >2005Jul17-16.26
    >2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    >and more. What do others use please?
    >
    >--
    >Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
  16. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Ralph" <Ralph.Smith2@team4.telstra6.com> wrote:

    >I guess it depends upon how many photos you take. I take drga racing and
    >family photos, not commercial.
    >I store my photos in folders with the date they were taken.
    >I then browse the new directories with IrfanView thumbnails to determine
    >what was taken on each date. I then make a brief note of what is each
    >directory in a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet has a different page for each
    >year and the entries are in date order.

    Many thanks for the many further replies. Several new ideas I hadn't
    previously considered seriously, especially:
    - dated *folders* rather than (or in addition to) dated filenames
    - the complementary use of a spreadsheet to aid retrieval (at the cost
    of additional input effort)

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  17. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:1mfnd11ls6ufuu00hekbg4gam59sbqohgu@4ax.com...
    > "Morten L.Pedersen" <mlp@melped.dk> wrote:
    >
    > >"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    > >news:vglmd19jb3a5hf19g43h1apl0b751p6htp@4ax.com...
    > >> I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > >> photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > >> anything consistent!
    > >>
    > >I leave the filename as it is from the camera. I dont believe in making
    the
    > >filename searchable.
    > >Instead I use EXIF/IPTC data, which can be embedded into the picturefile.
    > >This way I can use a lot more keywords, than there is room for in the
    > >filename. And I get a lot more flexibility when searching.
    > >Also the keywords and other info follows the picturefile.
    > >
    > >I use www.pixvue.com for adding EXIF/IPTC keywords/metadata and
    > >www.picasa.com as "photodatabase".
    > >In Picasa I can search for the keywords and other info in my
    picturefiles.
    >
    > Thanks, I'll take another look at both Picasa and pixvue.
    >
    > What do you with filenames for images that have no EXIF, such as from
    > old scans?
    >

    I give them a meaningfull filename (E.g. "<keyword>_<Date>.jpg") AND add
    EXIF/IPTC metadata (To make them searchable in Picasa).

    regards

    > --
    > Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
  18. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Owamanga" <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:bmhnd1des6o3uef3dhr49jucp778kkfotm@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    > <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > In view of the somewhat complicated approaches mentioned here, I
    > prefer my current system (having moved away from a more structured,
    > somewhat encrypted system that I used for films and negs).
    >
    > Here is an example directory snippet:
    >
    > Set044_Mar_2005_Renaissance_Festival
    > Set045_Mar_2005_St_Patrics_Day
    > Set046_Mar_2005_Universal_Studios
    > Set047_Apr_2005_Key_Lago_Dolphins
    > Set048_Apr_2005_Loxahatchee
    > Set049_Apr_2005_Sprinkler
    >
    > Set number represents a 1Gb or under CF card being filled. I usually
    > empty the card after any 'major' event, create the set and name it
    > accordingly. Underscores are optional of course, and this system
    > allows you to use whatever date format you are happy with because the
    > set-number keeps them in chronological order. One set will often
    > contain photos taken over a number of days, and the descriptive tag I
    > choose is one that best describes the majority of the photos.
    >
    > Inside, the DSC_NNNN.NEF files get renamed to the set number:
    >
    > 048_0001.NEF
    > 048_0002.NEF
    > 048_0003.NEF
    >
    > and so on...., this keeps the filenames of the images unique, but
    > still nice and small.
    >
    > Every few months I get around to making a small html based index in
    > each set, for fast visual location of a particular file (using
    > software that makes small thumbnails + 800x600 preview files, and
    > exposes the EXIF data for each image).
    >
    > I'm too damn lazy to add EXIF descriptions for every shot or create
    > some kind of database. Everything I print (using mpix.com) gets the
    > filename printed on the back of the photo, which makes it easy to
    > re-print if I need to.
    >
    > --

    With this approach it's difficult to find photos showing a particular person
    or photos with other specifich properties.
    The EXIF/IPTC metadata-approach takes a little work and effort, but it pays
    off, when you need to find that one particular picture.

    regards

    > Owamanga!
    > http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  19. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 10:29:52 +0200, "Morten L.Pedersen"
    <mlp@melped.dk> wrote:

    >"Owamanga" <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:bmhnd1des6o3uef3dhr49jucp778kkfotm@4ax.com...
    >> On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    >> <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> In view of the somewhat complicated approaches mentioned here, I
    >> prefer my current system (having moved away from a more structured,
    >> somewhat encrypted system that I used for films and negs).
    >>
    >> Here is an example directory snippet:
    >>
    >> Set044_Mar_2005_Renaissance_Festival
    >> Set045_Mar_2005_St_Patrics_Day
    >> Set046_Mar_2005_Universal_Studios
    >> Set047_Apr_2005_Key_Lago_Dolphins
    >> Set048_Apr_2005_Loxahatchee
    >> Set049_Apr_2005_Sprinkler
    >>
    >> Set number represents a 1Gb or under CF card being filled. I usually
    >> empty the card after any 'major' event, create the set and name it
    >> accordingly. Underscores are optional of course, and this system
    >> allows you to use whatever date format you are happy with because the
    >> set-number keeps them in chronological order. One set will often
    >> contain photos taken over a number of days, and the descriptive tag I
    >> choose is one that best describes the majority of the photos.
    >>
    >> Inside, the DSC_NNNN.NEF files get renamed to the set number:
    >>
    >> 048_0001.NEF
    >> 048_0002.NEF
    >> 048_0003.NEF
    >>
    >> and so on...., this keeps the filenames of the images unique, but
    >> still nice and small.
    >>
    >> Every few months I get around to making a small html based index in
    >> each set, for fast visual location of a particular file (using
    >> software that makes small thumbnails + 800x600 preview files, and
    >> exposes the EXIF data for each image).
    >>
    >> I'm too damn lazy to add EXIF descriptions for every shot or create
    >> some kind of database. Everything I print (using mpix.com) gets the
    >> filename printed on the back of the photo, which makes it easy to
    >> re-print if I need to.
    >>
    >> --
    >
    >With this approach it's difficult to find photos showing a particular person
    >or photos with other specifich properties.
    >The EXIF/IPTC metadata-approach takes a little work and effort, but it pays
    >off, when you need to find that one particular picture.

    I guess it depends heavily on your shooting habits. The subject of 70%
    of shots is my toddler, 25% is Florida wildlife and 5% is everything
    else. A searchable EXIF database has an extremely limited appeal for
    me. I can recall an image with good accuracy based on the event, and
    with my visual indexing system, finding the exact file is extremely
    rapid.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  20. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Owamanga" <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:stqpd1dfd2j6b9e8506mpdf7it583gnai3@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 10:29:52 +0200, "Morten L.Pedersen"
    > <mlp@melped.dk> wrote:
    >
    > >"Owamanga" <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > >news:bmhnd1des6o3uef3dhr49jucp778kkfotm@4ax.com...
    > >> On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    > >> <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> In view of the somewhat complicated approaches mentioned here, I
    > >> prefer my current system (having moved away from a more structured,
    > >> somewhat encrypted system that I used for films and negs).
    > >>
    > >> Here is an example directory snippet:
    > >>
    > >> Set044_Mar_2005_Renaissance_Festival
    > >> Set045_Mar_2005_St_Patrics_Day
    > >> Set046_Mar_2005_Universal_Studios
    > >> Set047_Apr_2005_Key_Lago_Dolphins
    > >> Set048_Apr_2005_Loxahatchee
    > >> Set049_Apr_2005_Sprinkler
    > >>
    > >> Set number represents a 1Gb or under CF card being filled. I usually
    > >> empty the card after any 'major' event, create the set and name it
    > >> accordingly. Underscores are optional of course, and this system
    > >> allows you to use whatever date format you are happy with because the
    > >> set-number keeps them in chronological order. One set will often
    > >> contain photos taken over a number of days, and the descriptive tag I
    > >> choose is one that best describes the majority of the photos.
    > >>
    > >> Inside, the DSC_NNNN.NEF files get renamed to the set number:
    > >>
    > >> 048_0001.NEF
    > >> 048_0002.NEF
    > >> 048_0003.NEF
    > >>
    > >> and so on...., this keeps the filenames of the images unique, but
    > >> still nice and small.
    > >>
    > >> Every few months I get around to making a small html based index in
    > >> each set, for fast visual location of a particular file (using
    > >> software that makes small thumbnails + 800x600 preview files, and
    > >> exposes the EXIF data for each image).
    > >>
    > >> I'm too damn lazy to add EXIF descriptions for every shot or create
    > >> some kind of database. Everything I print (using mpix.com) gets the
    > >> filename printed on the back of the photo, which makes it easy to
    > >> re-print if I need to.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >
    > >With this approach it's difficult to find photos showing a particular
    person
    > >or photos with other specifich properties.
    > >The EXIF/IPTC metadata-approach takes a little work and effort, but it
    pays
    > >off, when you need to find that one particular picture.
    >
    > I guess it depends heavily on your shooting habits. The subject of 70%
    > of shots is my toddler, 25% is Florida wildlife and 5% is everything
    > else. A searchable EXIF database has an extremely limited appeal for
    > me. I can recall an image with good accuracy based on the event, and
    > with my visual indexing system, finding the exact file is extremely
    > rapid.
    >

    But when you're not here anymore, a lot of info about your pictures will die
    with you.
    If you find a box of old photographs with no comments written on the back -
    they are not of much value to you when you don't know anything about who's
    on the pictures, where were they taken and so on.
    I try to treat my picturefiles as I treated my old negatives/paperprints. I
    placed them in an album and wrote comments beside them. Then my children and
    other people can get an idea about whats on the pictures, when they look at
    them 50 years from now...

    regards


    > --
    > Owamanga!
    > http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  21. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 16:10:42 +0200, "Morten L.Pedersen"
    <mlp@melped.dk> wrote:

    >But when you're not here anymore, a lot of info about your pictures will die
    >with you.

    That is true, yes. I'm not at all certain that an EXIF database will
    help. It'll probably disappear long before me. Tagging the files is
    the only hope, and I'm simply too lazy.

    >If you find a box of old photographs with no comments written on the back -
    >they are not of much value to you when you don't know anything about who's
    >on the pictures, where were they taken and so on.

    Usually the set names cover the general 'where' bit, of course the
    EXIF copes with the date. The 'who' is still missing, yes...

    >I try to treat my picturefiles as I treated my old negatives/paperprints. I
    >placed them in an album and wrote comments beside them. Then my children and
    >other people can get an idea about whats on the pictures, when they look at
    >them 50 years from now...

    Okay, maybe I'll add a text file alongside the images describing the
    batch in more detail, and specific people in specific shots.
    (Presuming of course the electronic version of the images survive any
    significant amount of time - something which I can't guarantee.)

    Over the last year I've been slowly scanning all my family slides -
    dating back from the early 50's. I named each slide with the people,
    date, and location. These are destined to become a slideshow on a DVD
    (I've done one already, the extended family loved it), but having
    since received another batch from the same time period, I need to
    re-do it.

    For this I want to put that filename info onto the subtitle track, so
    the viewer can switch it on or off as needed. On the first try, I
    grouped each batch of slide based on the decade it was shot, and added
    music from that era. The software I used lets you pan & zoom, and
    cross-fades which added interest and kept the thing from becoming
    tedious. It was cool, and I'll be making another one from my recent
    D70 photos.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  22. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Owamanga <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    >Over the last year I've been slowly scanning all my family slides -
    >dating back from the early 50's. I named each slide with the people,
    >date, and location. These are destined to become a slideshow on a DVD
    >(I've done one already, the extended family loved it), but having
    >since received another batch from the same time period, I need to
    >re-do it.
    >
    >For this I want to put that filename info onto the subtitle track, so
    >the viewer can switch it on or off as needed. On the first try, I
    >grouped each batch of slide based on the decade it was shot, and added
    >music from that era. The software I used lets you pan & zoom, and
    >cross-fades which added interest and kept the thing from becoming
    >tedious. It was cool, and I'll be making another one from my recent
    >D70 photos.

    I'm doing almost exactly the same here. Some of my photos are
    hand-me-downs, and go back to about 1940. What DVD software are you
    using? I have MemoriesOnTV, but that has no 'subtitle' track. (I can
    add text captions either as part of an image or a separate text-only
    image.) And I too am trying to come up with appropriate soundtracks
    for each decade. Good fun, but time-consuming stuff!

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  23. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 18:45:14 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:

    >Owamanga <owamanga-not-this-bit@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >>Over the last year I've been slowly scanning all my family slides -
    >>dating back from the early 50's. I named each slide with the people,
    >>date, and location. These are destined to become a slideshow on a DVD
    >>(I've done one already, the extended family loved it), but having
    >>since received another batch from the same time period, I need to
    >>re-do it.
    >>
    >>For this I want to put that filename info onto the subtitle track, so
    >>the viewer can switch it on or off as needed. On the first try, I
    >>grouped each batch of slide based on the decade it was shot, and added
    >>music from that era. The software I used lets you pan & zoom, and
    >>cross-fades which added interest and kept the thing from becoming
    >>tedious. It was cool, and I'll be making another one from my recent
    >>D70 photos.
    >
    >I'm doing almost exactly the same here. Some of my photos are
    >hand-me-downs, and go back to about 1940. What DVD software are you
    >using? I have MemoriesOnTV, but that has no 'subtitle' track. (I can
    >add text captions either as part of an image or a separate text-only
    >image.) And I too am trying to come up with appropriate soundtracks
    >for each decade. Good fun, but time-consuming stuff!

    Canopus Imaginate

    http://www.canopus.us/US/products/Imaginate2/pm_imaginate2.asp

    Quality was superb - zooms pans etc are jitter-free, but it's hardly a
    single-click operation, and I had to use other authoring software to
    get the AVI's it made onto a DVD. I could add the soundtrack, but
    needed to do the fade in other software. I recall it had a some stupid
    limitation of around 100 pictures in any one sequence too.

    So, basically it made me a DV compliant video sequence containing the
    slide show. This meant I could (but didn't) bring it into premiere for
    bits of home video to be included in the mix. I also got to build my
    own DVD menu and stuff. Lots of control, but far too much work really.

    Subtitles I need to investigate further, I have no experience of them
    at all.

    MemoriesOnTV looks quite good, I may DL the trial version they have,
    it's a quarter the price of Imaginate too.

    Given it's the limitation of no subtitle support, maybe simply
    creating 2 nearly identical titles on the DVD - One clean one with no
    text, and the other with text describing each image (MOTV supports
    that). Two versions of one half-hour slide show should fit nicely onto
    the disk.

    I'm gonna have the same problem when I get round to editing my DV home
    videos and putting them onto DVD - I want to retain the date/time
    info, and a subtitle track is the perfect place for it, so I've really
    got to figure out how these are authored, and what software is needed.

    Either that, (still on home video here) or between scenes add little
    title pages that describe the location, date etc. I guess the time
    isn't *that* relevant.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  24. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 18:45:14 +0100, Terry Pinnell
    <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:

    >And I too am trying to come up with appropriate soundtracks
    >for each decade. Good fun, but time-consuming stuff!

    (I didn't read your post fully the first time...)

    alt.binaries.sounds.1940s.mp3
    alt.binaries.sounds.1950s.mp3
    alt.binaries.sounds.1960s.mp3
    alt.binaries.sounds.1970s.mp3
    alt.binaries.sounds.1980s.mp3

    ...I can see a pattern here..

    Usenet is a very handy resource for this type of project. I'm blessed
    with easynews as my provider who have a web-based global search just
    to make things really simple.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  25. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell wrote:

    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG

    That looks like [July 17, 2005] [09] [4:26PM] [Exceat.JPG] to me.
    Since most cameras can take many pictures in less than one minute,
    would the 09 be a misplaced 'seconds' counter, where the time was
    4:26:09PM? You'd need a seconds counter if you took several
    pictures rapidly in Exceat. Here's hoping you don't get (and use) a
    camera that can take long rapid bursts of pictures where you might
    end up with more than 60 shots taken within a minute. Maybe your
    current camera can't do that, but you might want to plan in advance
    for the camera you might be using 3 years from now. In that case a
    unique sequential key would help. They're generally used in
    relational and other database tables and might be a worthwhile
    addition to your naming scheme, even if you don't plan on using a
    database to keep track of your photos in the near future.
  26. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry, I forgot to add that I also place the date folders into a year
    folder. This reduces the number of folders I am presented with. I usually do
    this every couple of months. i don't shoot often enough to worry about
    monthly folders.

    --
    remove n u m b e r s to reply
    Terry Pinnell wrote in message ...
    >"Ralph" <Ralph.Smith2@team4.telstra6.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I guess it depends upon how many photos you take. I take drga racing and
    >>family photos, not commercial.
    >>I store my photos in folders with the date they were taken.
    >>I then browse the new directories with IrfanView thumbnails to determine
    >>what was taken on each date. I then make a brief note of what is each
    >>directory in a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet has a different page for each
    >>year and the entries are in date order.
    >
    >Many thanks for the many further replies. Several new ideas I hadn't
    >previously considered seriously, especially:
    >- dated *folders* rather than (or in addition to) dated filenames
    >- the complementary use of a spreadsheet to aid retrieval (at the cost
    >of additional input effort)
    >
    >--
    >Terry, West Sussex, UK
    >
  27. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell wrote:
    > I'd appreciate learning what format others have chosen for renaming
    > photos please. Despite much experiment, I've still not settled on
    > anything consistent!
    >
    > In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making
    > the
    > major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    > For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a
    > place
    > called Exceat could be renamed from
    > DSC0005.jpg to
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    > or
    > Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > But, assuming I do settle on making Date/Time Taken the major sort,
    > there are so many formats possible for that. I've tried:
    > 2005-07-17-09-16-26
    > 2005-07-17 09.16.26
    > 05-07-17 09.16.26 (that space can cause problems)
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16.26
    > 2005Jul17-16:26 (looks better but often the ':' screws up)
    >
    > and more. What do others use please?

    Way back in history (couple years ago) I used jhead to translate EXIF
    time (to the second) and date into file names, using a batch file.
    Filenames looked this way:
    2003_06_01_140224
    Very little likelihood of duplicate file names.
    I stored them in folders named for the camera and date they were made:
    nA20030601 nA being a nikon CP995.

    Somehow over the years I lost track of the benefits of renaming the
    files _per_ EXIF, and today the originals maintain camera-assigned
    names:
    _MG_2231.CR2
    They are stored in folders named for the camera and the date they were
    copied from the CF card to to a drive, and the drive designation; I
    add the number of the last frame in the folder:
    20d_20050221_d_2231

    After copying the files from the card to the working drive, I copy the
    entire folder to an external drive (and rename the folder according to
    its new location:
    20d_20050221_k_2231), where it languishes until the drive is full,
    when I replace it and pack it off to a safe place.

    When pictures are modified (that is, a new file is made based on the
    content of the original), I replace the camera-assigned prefix with a
    descriptive abbreviation:
    worldEnds_2231.PSD
    subsequent versions are designated by appropriate crypts:
    worldEnds_2231c.PSD ("c" for "crop"; "m" for "modified"; "p" for
    "print optimized"; "t" for "thumbnail"; "w" for "web"; _etc_).

    Files that have been awarded real names are stored in folders named
    after projects:
    worldEnds200506
    Projects are stored in folders named for their era (year and month)
    200506
    All these are copied to the external drive folder called "projects"
    from time to time.

    Someday soon I will probably lose track of the general date-area
    certain pictures were made, and my searches will become more
    difficult; so far it has been pretty easy finding a particular
    picture. I use "Agent Ransack" to search for filenames that have been
    key-word implanted. It works quick and well.
    http://www.mythicsoft.com/agentransack/default.aspx

    Since the camera-assigned mumber is always associated with every
    version of the picture, finding the original and all declensions is
    relatively quick.

    I didn't plan this scheme: it just grew, but is pretty consistently
    applied since about December last year. I'd like to be more organized,
    but you know how it is with artists...

    --
    Frank ess

    "Verbing wierds language."
    -Calvin
  28. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell wrote:

    > Many thanks for the many further replies. Several new ideas I hadn't
    > previously considered seriously, especially:
    > - dated *folders* rather than (or in addition to) dated filenames
    > - the complementary use of a spreadsheet to aid retrieval (at the cost
    > of additional input effort)

    I don't know what kind of background you have, but the issue falls
    under the general rubric of "database design", for which there are many
    texts. Perhaps too many ;-/ If you have or plan on gathering a large
    collection of images, I advise you to ditch the 'spreadsheet' and use a
    formal RDBMS

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDBMS

    I've been slowly developing a simple scheme around the normal
    filesystem for image and image meta-data storage and MySQL and some
    shell scripts to index the lot automatically.
  29. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Terry Pinnell <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    >For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from
    >a place called Exceat could be renamed from
    >DSC0005.jpg to
    >2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG

    Just noticed my careless slip above. Rather academic at this late
    stage of the thread, but for the record (and anyone seeing this thread
    in future) it should of course read:
    "For example, my photo taken at about 9:16am yesterday..."

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  30. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    ASAAR <caught@22.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 08:13:16 +0100, Terry Pinnell wrote:
    >
    >> In particular, with future sorting in mind, I vary between making the
    >> major field the Date/Time Taken, or some keyword about the subject.
    >> For example, my photo taken at 4:26pm yesterday on a walk from a place
    >> called Exceat could be renamed from
    >> DSC0005.jpg to
    >> 2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >> or
    >> Exceat-2005-07-17-09-16-26-Exceat.JPG
    >
    > That looks like [July 17, 2005] [09] [4:26PM] [Exceat.JPG] to me.
    >Since most cameras can take many pictures in less than one minute,
    >would the 09 be a misplaced 'seconds' counter, where the time was
    >4:26:09PM? You'd need a seconds counter if you took several
    >pictures rapidly in Exceat. Here's hoping you don't get (and use) a
    >camera that can take long rapid bursts of pictures where you might
    >end up with more than 60 shots taken within a minute. Maybe your
    >current camera can't do that, but you might want to plan in advance
    >for the camera you might be using 3 years from now. In that case a
    >unique sequential key would help. They're generally used in
    >relational and other database tables and might be a worthwhile
    >addition to your naming scheme, even if you don't plan on using a
    >database to keep track of your photos in the near future.

    Sorry, that was my slip! It should of course read:
    "For example, my photo taken at about 9:16am yesterday..."

    Only spotted it now, on reading your post - thanks <g>.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
  31. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Ralph wrote:

    > The advantage of a spreadsheet over a database is that it is more likely to
    > be readable in the future. A plain text file would be even more future proof
    > IMO.

    Why stop there? Why not etch it in cuneiform onto clay tablets and
    bake them in a kiln for 3 days? If it wasn't for the USA, people would
    still be digging this sort of thing out of the ground in Iraq 5
    thousand years later.

    Of course, if a "plain text file" is in fact "future proof", then you
    can always ask your RDBMS to just export your table(s) as such.
  32. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 09:41:21 +0100, Terry Pinnell wrote:

    >> That looks like [July 17, 2005] [09] [4:26PM] [Exceat.JPG] to me.
    >
    > Sorry, that was my slip! It should of course read:
    > "For example, my photo taken at about 9:16am yesterday..."

    No problem, there was plenty of context in your message so what
    you were asking about in the OP was clear. I just wondered if there
    was any special significance to the "09" and if so what it might be,
    all the while mentally hearing Lennon's(?) voice proclaiming "Number
    9. Number 9. Number 9 . . .".
  33. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 21 Jul 2005 12:03:15 -0700, eawckyegcy@yahoo.com wrote:

    >Ralph wrote:
    >
    >> The advantage of a spreadsheet over a database is that it is more likely to
    >> be readable in the future. A plain text file would be even more future proof
    >> IMO.
    >
    >Why stop there? Why not etch it in cuneiform onto clay tablets and
    >bake them in a kiln for 3 days? If it wasn't for the USA, people would
    >still be digging this sort of thing out of the ground in Iraq 5
    >thousand years later.
    >
    >Of course, if a "plain text file" is in fact "future proof", then you
    >can always ask your RDBMS to just export your table(s) as such.

    Sure, ASCII is about as future proof as EBCDIC was.

    <g>

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
  34. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    The advantage of a spreadsheet over a database is that it is more likely to
    be readable in the future. A plain text file would be even more future proof
    IMO.

    --
    remove n u m b e r s to reply
    eawckyegcy@yahoo.com wrote in message
    <1121882858.789973.244170@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
    >Terry Pinnell wrote:
    >
    >> Many thanks for the many further replies. Several new ideas I hadn't
    >> previously considered seriously, especially:
    >> - dated *folders* rather than (or in addition to) dated filenames
    >> - the complementary use of a spreadsheet to aid retrieval (at the cost
    >> of additional input effort)
    >
    >I don't know what kind of background you have, but the issue falls
    >under the general rubric of "database design", for which there are many
    >texts. Perhaps too many ;-/ If you have or plan on gathering a large
    >collection of images, I advise you to ditch the 'spreadsheet' and use a
    >formal RDBMS
    >
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDBMS
    >
    >I've been slowly developing a simple scheme around the normal
    >filesystem for image and image meta-data storage and MySQL and some
    >shell scripts to index the lot automatically.
    >
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