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Question on scanning B&W

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Anonymous
July 18, 2005 4:39:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I recently purchased CanoScan LiDE 35 - a great simple flatbed scanner
- in order to scan prints that I shoot on both B&W and color film.

CanoScan Toolbox, the software included with the scanner, can perform a
multi-scan and crop 2 or 3 4"x6" photos and save them as individual
files.

This is a nice, which speeds up the process a lot, but for some reason
it is available only for color scanning (not for grayscale).

Since most of my prints are B&W, what I thought of doing is scan them
as color prints (so that they be cropped automatically) and then remove
color information (i.e. convert to grayscale).

My question, as I'm a real novice on scanning, is whether by following
process there is any quality loss or not. Is what I do ok, or should I
better scan my B&W prints only on grayscale mode?

Any help will be deeply appreciated.

More about : question scanning

July 18, 2005 6:38:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"stefanos" <stefanos.stavridis@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1121672367.136667.110390@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>I recently purchased CanoScan LiDE 35 - a great simple flatbed scanner
> - in order to scan prints that I shoot on both B&W and color film.
>
> CanoScan Toolbox, the software included with the scanner, can perform a
> multi-scan and crop 2 or 3 4"x6" photos and save them as individual
> files.
>
> This is a nice, which speeds up the process a lot, but for some reason
> it is available only for color scanning (not for grayscale).
>
> Since most of my prints are B&W, what I thought of doing is scan them
> as color prints (so that they be cropped automatically) and then remove
> color information (i.e. convert to grayscale).
>
> My question, as I'm a real novice on scanning, is whether by following
> process there is any quality loss or not. Is what I do ok, or should I
> better scan my B&W prints only on grayscale mode?
>
> Any help will be deeply appreciated.

Hit the SAVE button on Toobox , select the multi or crop option and the
check the box "Use scanner driver to make advanced settings". Hit the scan
button on the form and you will then be allowed to select greyscale. I
don't know how well it works but the option is there.
Anonymous
July 18, 2005 8:44:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

stefanos wrote:
> I recently purchased CanoScan LiDE 35 - a great simple flatbed scanner
> - in order to scan prints that I shoot on both B&W and color film.
>
> CanoScan Toolbox, the software included with the scanner, can perform a
> multi-scan and crop 2 or 3 4"x6" photos and save them as individual
> files.
>
> This is a nice, which speeds up the process a lot, but for some reason
> it is available only for color scanning (not for grayscale).
>
> Since most of my prints are B&W, what I thought of doing is scan them
> as color prints (so that they be cropped automatically) and then remove
> color information (i.e. convert to grayscale).
>
> My question, as I'm a real novice on scanning, is whether by following
> process there is any quality loss or not. Is what I do ok, or should I
> better scan my B&W prints only on grayscale mode?
>
> Any help will be deeply appreciated.
>
i have a simular scanner. i scan in color and convert to B&W if i need
it in absolute B&W or grey scale. it will shrink the image size quite a
bit once it's in grey/B&W. i usually don't scan anything under 300 DPI.
if it's a really important image i'll scan in 600 DPI, and shrink it in
a photo editer program if i really have to get the file size down. (you
get to a point when the files so big, just opening it crashes your
system. i've found mine starts crashing at around 50-60 megs on a photo.
(hey i'm graphiclly challenged ok!)


try scanning in a photo several different ways. as grey scale, B&W,
color, and then look at it in your photo editer and see which type
apeals to you the most. i liked the color output on the B&W photos and
then converting to grey scale in another program personally. you may
however like the greyscaling the scanner does in program. who knows,
it's your choice. (which you probably already knew.)


cheers
kat
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Anonymous
July 19, 2005 3:42:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks to all (kat, JB, Daniel, Dave) for your valuable help! Your
insight has been very useful to me. Thanks! :) 
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 4:31:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 18 Jul 2005 00:39:27 -0700, "stefanos"
<stefanos.stavridis@gmail.com> wrote:

....snip...

>My question, as I'm a real novice on scanning, is whether by following
>process there is any quality loss or not. Is what I do ok, or should I
>better scan my B&W prints only on grayscale mode?
>
>Any help will be deeply appreciated.

A good starting point is:

<http://www.scantips.com/&gt;

Have a good time

--
Daniel L.
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 6:01:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"stefanos" <stefanos.stavridis@gmail.com> writes:

>Since most of my prints are B&W, what I thought of doing is scan them
>as color prints (so that they be cropped automatically) and then remove
>color information (i.e. convert to grayscale).

>My question, as I'm a real novice on scanning, is whether by following
>process there is any quality loss or not. Is what I do ok, or should I
>better scan my B&W prints only on grayscale mode?

First, you should know that the LiDE scanners in greyscale mode are
actually doing a green-only scan. The sensor is monochrome, and colour
scanning is done by changing the light source between red, green, and
blue in rapid succession. If you have the scanner lid open during a B&W
scan, you'll see there is only green light.

This is mostly important if you're scanning a colour original and
expecting the result of a B&W scan to be equivalent to a colour scan
converted to greyscale - you won't get the same effect at all. But
since you're starting with monochrome source material, it's OK.

On the other hand, the only real penalty for scanning in RGB is that
the scanner is slower since it has to switch light sources and pass
back 3X as much data. But if using RGB saves you time overall because
of the automatic cropping, it's worth doing. You might even get a
little bit of noise reduction from averaging RGB data rather than doing
a green-only scan.

Dave
!