Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Types of PSU for Mini ITX, and what are some brand?

Last response: in Components
Share
September 28, 2012 12:00:53 PM

Hi,

I'm looking for a PSU that will fit in to my next build, which will be a mini itx build in a tiny case. (I had enough of big heavy computer, just want something small that is easy to move around) :) 

I have spent some time searching for a small case, and found this little beauty: Realan E-I3
http://www.itxcase.net/product_E-I3.html

I plan to have AMD's latest Trinity A10 5700 in it, as it has an integrated gpu that is actually capable of playing some games on med-low settings.

Since I don't have any experience building a small pc, I'm a bit confuse about the psu i should used there. A normal psu would definitely not fit.

My questions are:

1. how much power do i need for this build, which has an AMD 65w TDP cpu, one 128G SSD, and maybe 2 sticks of DDR3 ram?

2. what types of psu would fit in to my case? (I notice there is something called pico psu)

3. is the psu that come with the case enough for this build? or should i look for a better quality brand one? (plz suggest some, i dont know any of it, :kaola:  )

Thank you for any help! :) 
a c 128 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 12:16:21 PM

For the build you describe, the included power should work. I would figure you may draw up to 70W under a "normal high load" condition so 120W is plenty. Finding external power supplies is kinda tricky since there is no standarization for the inside part(s). I don't think the case itself is big enough to allow the use of an internal PSU.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 12:27:13 PM

C12Friedman said:
For the build you describe, the included power should work. I would figure you may draw up to 70W under a "normal high load" condition so 120W is plenty. Finding external power supplies is kinda tricky since there is no standarization for the inside part(s). I don't think the case itself is big enough to allow the use of an internal PSU.

Good to know that 120w is enough, dont know why i used the psu calculator that recommend i used 150w! btw, do you know what is that "DC-DC Board (LR1005)"? i google it, and still have no idea what type of psu is it. :) 
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 79 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 12:44:21 PM

While the case comes with a 120 watt power supply, it only has a 60 watt power brick.

You may want to see if a bigger power brick can be obtained

EDIT

It is not a type of PSU(as such like ATX/SFX and whatnot) it is just a bare board DC-DC converter(that meets ATX power requirements most likely) made to fit in the small case.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 12:46:22 PM

The DC-DC board is the internal part of the 2 part PSU. Similar to a notebook you get an external power brick that supplies 12 volts. The DC-DC board takes the 12V and puts out all the other voltages you need in a PC.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 12:50:31 PM

it means it takes DC input and gives DC output ... in other words you have to use a brick between outlet and case // dunno if thats what yo mean
the thing is, the one supplied with case you linked only gives 12V @5A , only 60W
you may want to look for something like picoPSU http://www.mini-box.com/picoPSU-150-XT-150W-Adapter-Pow...
or a different case with better power supply
m
0
l
a c 128 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 12:54:05 PM

50% load is pretty much the "sweet spot" for PSU's so that's about where the calculator put you.
I could figure nothing out by the pictures of the DC board either - Goolging 11E13 PCB only refered me to Cincon (makers of power adapters) but nothing else.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 12:57:33 PM

Check your PMs brick. Send ya one. Right corner up top.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 1:11:10 PM

So... the dc-dc board can take in and give out 120w, but the ac adapter can only produce 60w? how can i get a 120w ac adapter, are there any compatibility issue, like would any ac adapter work?
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 79 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 1:23:19 PM

It should be a good quality adapter(low voltage ripple and regulated).

The reason for this is I am not sure how much the 12 volt line is filtered it may just go right to the board. The other rails will be created and filtered on the DC-DC board.

You can find computer 12 volt power adapters @ 12 volts on the net for laptops and SFF systems.

A user above lists picopsu. you can normally get the power adapters from the stores that sell those power supplies as well.

Now you also have to ensure the power plug is the same size and polarity(you can add your own plug or fix polarity your self if you are ok working with that kind of thing).
Share
September 28, 2012 1:47:26 PM

Best answer selected by brick007123.
m
0
l
September 28, 2012 1:49:55 PM

nukemaster said:
It should be a good quality adapter(low voltage ripple and regulated).

The reason for this is I am not sure how much the 12 volt line is filtered it may just go right to the board. The other rails will be created and filtered on the DC-DC board.

You can find computer 12 volt power adapters @ 12 volts on the net for laptops and SFF systems.

A user above lists picopsu. you can normally get the power adapters from the stores that sell those power supplies as well.

Now you also have to ensure the power plug is the same size and polarity(you can add your own plug or fix polarity your self if you are ok working with that kind of thing).

Thx! i just found a 12v/7a adapter from the same factory. And i have learned a lot! :) 
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 1:55:41 PM

nukemaster said:
Now you also have to ensure the power plug is the same size and polarity.

That should not be a problem. Most 30+ watts AC-DC adapters have a ground pin which is tied to neutral output to ground equipment and this is always the outer connection on barrel-type connectors to minimize the risk of shorts to other equipment and surfaces.

That aside, all the barrel type connectors on DC adapters I remember seeing over the past 20+ years had inner positive polarity.
m
0
l
a c 79 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 1:58:59 PM

That puts you up to 84 watts.

I do not have the latest power measurements for that cpu, but ITX boards are very good on power and SSDs are just insanely good on power.

To add to it, A H55N USB3 + 5770 draws about 140 in games and 180 with games + prime(Idle was about 40 watts), since you have no video card to worry about and a more power friendly cpu, I see good things for your future.

If you can squeeze a bit more power it never hurts.
m
0
l
a c 79 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 2:01:03 PM

InvalidError said:
That aside, all the barrel type connectors on DC adapters I remember seeing over the past 20+ years had inner positive polarity.

You bring up an EXTREMELY good point. Something i never even thought of, but for sure i will be wiring my connectors negative outside pos inside. Thanks.

Out of quite a few, I only have 1 that is labeled as + outside, but its old an low powered.
m
0
l
a c 121 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 2:51:29 PM

First of all, I share your POV about huge bulky systems. They have their place, especially to hold lots of hard drives, but for most uses a mini-ITX is actually sufficient. Chasing UltraSuperMaxOhWOW! settings on every game, requiring multiple, expensive graphics cards, is a never-ending pursuit, requiring yearly (or more frequent) expensive upgrades. Accepting "Good" settings (high to ultra) will allow a single decent GPU to last for years. Accordingly, my own primary PC is a mini-ITX.
Especially if you want to play games, you are severely limiting the expected useful life of a system with a mere 120W power ceiling. I would like to suggest a couple of alternatives.
You may consider even a case like mine (PC-Q08R) to be bigger than you want. One choice then is a slim case, like http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... which will limit you to low-profile but still competent graphics cards up to the HD7750.
There are GOOD power supplies (e.g. Seasonic) available in the TFX form factor it uses, in sizes up to 350W. One example is http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
There is also the "shoebox" style case, such as this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (you would discard its included PSU-shaped object). This case will take a full-height graphics card, but limited to a single slot width. You may be limited to a HD7750 in a case like that too, such as http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (which I have myself in a test rig). There are some other cards with only one slot-face, but their coolers may be too big to let them fit.
Good PSUs are available for that type of case also, such as http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
a c 79 ) Power supply
September 28, 2012 3:02:18 PM

If we are on the topic of SFF.

I am kind of partial to the SG05 since i have had it for a while and it works very well for me, but is not the quietest unless you are careful with parts and swap the power supply fan(its thin so watch it, or be ready to let the fan hand out of the power supply.).

http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=210

Built it for a media center(i5 750 + 5770[the 7750 would be as good now days]) and in the end did lots of gaming on it since it was more then I expected :) 

jtt283, PM me some pics of your SFF builds I am interested now.
m
0
l
!