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Need help!! $700ish build recommendations

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Last response: in Systems
June 2, 2012 9:21:17 PM

I'm new to building, so what I want may be comical for what I'm looking to spend.

Approximate Purchase Date: In the next couple of weeks.

Budget Range: I'd like to keep it around $700 up to $800 if necessary.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Mostly looking to play Diablo 3. Other than that just web browsing.

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: No preference, and I do have a close microcenter.

Country: U.S.

Parts Preferences: No real preference, but I would like an SSD if it could fit in my budget.

Overclocking: No

Monitor Resolution: I was planning on using an HDTV.. pro's/con/s for that??

Additional Comments: The quieter the better, but that's not a game changer.

More about : 700ish build recommendations

June 2, 2012 9:30:47 PM

The only thing I can see is that if you want to max out performance in the price range there may not be that much room for an SSD. Our build preferences are pretty similar so if you can find my thread that may give you somewhere to start. Take advantage of the microcenter at the very least. Saves a good deal of cash with some parts.
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June 2, 2012 9:33:43 PM

HDTVs have large pixels and inferior refresh rates (TV Hz is not equal to monitor Hz). That can make text harder to read, but it shouldn't be a problem for pictures (it can hurt gaming quality a little). You might not notice it, but then again, you might. Your budget might be a little low to fit in a decent SSD. Id Diablo 3 is what you want to play, then I'd recommend a Radeon 7770 for your graphics card and an Intel i3-2100 as your CPU (H67, Z68, H77, and Z77 are usually the preferable motherboard chipsets and the Z chipset boards are usually preferably among them even if you're not overclocking because they tend to be of higher qualtiy, although this is not always the case).
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June 2, 2012 10:28:30 PM

Is your HDTV 720p or 1080p? What size is it? Depending, you might want a monitor. Anyway, here is a non-monitor build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($142.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($51.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($67.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 1GB Video Card ($209.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: OCZ 600W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $745.77
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-06-02 18:21 EDT-0400)

And here is a monitor build:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($129.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($51.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 1GB Video Card ($166.97 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case ($42.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: OCZ 600W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($53.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.97 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Acer S220HQLAbd 21.5" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $790.72
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-06-02 18:28 EDT-0400)
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June 2, 2012 10:37:21 PM

1GB of video card VRAM for a 1080p build? That could hurt future proofing a lot. A 2GB card is a better option (1.5GB would be enough, but the only 1.5GB card in this budget range almost worth having is the GTX 480, but it uses too much power for me to recommend it). Besides, the Radeon 7850 is a much better option than the GTX 560 TI. The 7850 uses much less power, has 2GB of VRAM, is faster, and its higher price is negated by the free game (or two) that it comes with. Even if the free game wasn't enough to keep the cost down, switching from the i5 to an i3 would not hurt gaming performance because the i3 is more than fast enough for the 7850 and the somewhat slower GTX 560 TI.

Also, its usually best to use a Corsair, Antec, or Seasonic PSU and the most highly factory overclocked Radeon 7770s are on-par with the GTX 560 in performance while using half the power and being about the same price (often cheaper) while like the 7850, coming with a free game that makes them cheaper than the GTX 560 TI and even cheaper than the GTX 550 TI.

About the PSU, it is good enough quality that for it's price, it is a great value and I can recommend it if the extra $20 or so it saves is important (for this budget, I'd say that it is), I'm jsut trying to keep things in perspective about it. The video cards, however, I do not recommend. As of right now, I would not buy a mid-range Nvidia card until Nvidia has mid-range Kepler cards out. The competing AMD cards use so much less power that they can save a good amount of money in the electric bill.
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June 2, 2012 10:45:10 PM

blazorthon said:
1GB of video card VRAM for a 1080p build? That could hurt future proofing a lot. A 2GB card is a better option. Besides, the Radeon 7850 is a much better option than the GTX 560 TI. The 7850 uses much less power, has 2GB of VRAM, is faster, and its higher price is negated by the free game (or two) that it comes with. Even if the free game wasn't enough to keep the cost down, switching from the i5 to an i3 would not hurt gaming performance because the i3 is more than fast enough for the 7850 and the somewhat slower GTX 560 TI.

Agreed, I would say use Ironslice's build, it is good except for the fact you can get the ASRock Extreme4 bundled with the i5-2500k at Micro Center, which reduces the cost of the Motherboard to $89.99. This would leave $50 for upgrading to the SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7850.

The mobo @ MC (Ignore the 3570k; the deal applies to the 2500k as well.):
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

Radeon HD 7850:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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June 2, 2012 10:59:44 PM

Merueth said:
Agreed, I would say use Ironslice's build, it is good except for the fact you can get the ASRock Extreme4 bundled with the i5-2500k at Micro Center, which reduces the cost of the Motherboard to $89.99. This would leave $50 for upgrading to the SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7850.

The mobo @ MC (Ignore the 3570k; the deal applies to the 2500k as well.):
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

Radeon HD 7850:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Sounds good to me. :) 
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June 3, 2012 2:35:58 AM

Wouldn't the raedon 6870 be fine? It's a lot cheaper too.
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June 3, 2012 3:05:33 AM

Just because something is fine, there is no reason to get better? The 7850 fits in the budget, isn't ridiculously overpowered for this build, and would still use less power than the 6870 while having twice as much memory (more future-proofing) and far greater overclocking capability (even more future-proofing). Even if Diablo 3 is the only game that OP plays, there will likely be picture quality improving mods and if OP wants to play them, then OP will need adequate graphics performance for the mods.
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June 5, 2012 12:19:03 AM

Thanks for the help everyone! I think I'm going to go with the build from Ironslice except with the 7850.. That cpu/mobo combo is to good a deal to pass up.

Couple questions though, has anybody used the G. Skill sniper low voltage RAM with the Z77 Extreme4? I saw some compatibility issues with certain mobos when reading up on that series. If it is compatible it sounds perfect for what I'm looking for. Also, does anybody have experience with ouletpc.com? Newegg is out of the Sapphire 7850 and they were the only place with the same price.

Oh, and I will be using am Insignia 32" 1080p LED LCD, I think 60hz. No good?
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June 5, 2012 3:24:18 AM

Keep in mind that TVs tend to have larger pixels than monitors, so text and such will likely have poorer contrast than even a cheap monitor, especially on a large display such as yours that only has a resolution of 1080p. How good it is will depend on your personal preference. It should work fine, but whether or not you like how it looks as a monitor is something that you'll have to try out yourself.

Low voltage RAM should work on the Extreme4, but I have not tried it myself. I am not familiar with outletpc.com, but I think that I've heard of them. They're probably fine, but I'm not sure.
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June 6, 2012 3:13:49 PM

Dumb question: why low-voltage RAM? Especially with no overclocking?
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June 6, 2012 11:58:20 PM

I was wondering the same thing. I'm guessing that ironslice chose it because it its on the mobo's approved ram list while the regular sniper series is not.

I bought the 2500k/z77 extreme 4 today.. Only $260. I love microcenter.

The rest of the build will be the same except I'm going with a haf 912 case, and sapphire 7850.
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June 8, 2012 6:39:50 AM

Sure... But that PSU looks to be way overpriced.
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June 8, 2012 4:10:22 PM

That price ($109) comes with the OCS ZT 550W and a 60G SSD.

and $30 worth of mail in rebates.

I think $80 is worth an 80 plus bronze psu and 60G SSD.
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June 9, 2012 9:02:00 AM

True... That is good if the SSD is considered, my bad.

EDIT: Oh, that PSU is modular, so even better. However, might want to do a little research on that PSU first. Some OCZ PSUs are great, but some are junk. OCZ doesn't make their own PSUs; OCZ PSUs are re-brands, so quality varies widely and depends on the actual manufacturer of the PSU. For example, I think that some were made by RAIDMAX (among other poor manufacturers, some of which were even worse) and those ones are garbage that can be just as likely to burn out, take all of the other components with it, and if they really don't like you, even blow up on occasion, as they are likely to work for more than a few months to two years. In stark contrast to that, some OCZ PSUs can be incredibly durable and all around great.
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