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Compatibility check! :)

I was wondering if all of this seems compatible and such.

It's my first -real- build, and the only computer I will have ever owned that games with more than 20 frames on average, which is why it's kinda pricey.


Project EVA
(It's a Newegg wishlist ;) )

Feel free to give me criticism on the build.

As for what I'd be doing with it, I'll be heavily gaming, mostly MMOs like AION, RIFT, maybe some WoW and EQ(Yep!)

I multi-task quite often, so triple-monitors is a must for me, since I used dual-monitors before my latest PC died on me, I've been hooked on multi-monitors. I will FPS just as religiously as MMOs, though that'll be full screen instead of windowed so I wont be multi-tasking there, just running a massive resolution.

Any other questions, I'll be happy to answer.

This is my dream machine, so any improvements are welcome
(Just be real, I'm not buying a 10 grand system to game on. :P)
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about compatibility check
  1. Best answer
    Couple of suggestions

    Swap that PSU out for the Seasonic X-1250 in my sig. That Antec PSU is manufactured by Delta. Delta is about as reputable as Seasonic (which it to say they're both excellent) but the 1250 can often be found for around the same price and offers a little bit more.

    Consider getting a case by a manufacturer other than Thermaltake. The last one I owned was built like a bunker but nothing ever seemed to fit right and the metalwork was a little rough. Keep in mind that you don't even necessarily need to buy a flashy gaming case with a billion fans. Antec makes some amazing workstation midtowers for around the same price. I'm a particular fan of the Antec P183 mid tower and P193 full tower. If you want something that's both stylish and wonderful to work with check out the Corsair cases.

    If you're getting a Z77 motherboard you should pair it with an Ivybridge CPU. Swap that 2700k out for a 3770. It'll run cooler (temperatures will be higher but total heat output is lower due to the small die size). You'll also get the nice RAND extensions and PCIe 3.0.

    Drop the OCZ Agility 3 and replace it with a lower capacity Vertex or a Mushkin Chronos Deluxe. There's no need to drop over 300 dollars (after rebate) on a midrange SSD, the price premium of that space isn't worth it. 120GB is enough for your OS and demand based applications, 240 will be plenty for your games too. Put in a 240/256 GB high-end SSD instead and upgrade the Barracua to a 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black. The failure rates on 300+GB SSDs and 3TB+ HDDs are still high.

    Use the savings on the hard drive space (you can always add more later on when the prices drop further) to invest in a better monitor. Acer is garbage and CCFL TN LCDs are going out of style like its 1999. Get a good Samsung LED instead such as the one below. The monitor market is extremely mature so buying a good one now will last you 5-8 years.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824001553

    Corsair H80 is awesome but H100 is better and you might be able to get it for the same price or less. I got mine for only 90 bucks on sale, take a look around.

    Print that list out and take it to your local computer shop if you have one, they might be willing to beat newegg on some prices.

    Good luck!
  2. That is one hell of a reply! And what SSD would you recommend? The failure rates is a good thing to know, to stay away from the larger drives and such.

    And as for the 3770, it'll run on-par with the 2700k, I assume? I'm still learning these things, been doing some research for about a month or two, just to get myself used to all of the information I can.

    And I'll look around for the H100!

    Thanks for the speedy reply on that one. :)
  3. Best answer selected by ThatNoob90.
  4. Quote:
    Consider getting a case by a manufacturer other than Thermaltake. The last one I owned was built like a bunker but nothing ever seemed to fit right and the metalwork was a little rough. Keep in mind that you don't even necessarily need to buy a flashy gaming case with a billion fans. Antec makes some amazing workstation midtowers for around the same price. I'm a particular fan of the Antec P183 mid tower and P193 full tower. If you want something that's both stylish and wonderful to work with check out the Corsair cases.


    I agree - Thermaltake is a horrible case manufacturer - we've bought a few where I work and they're so cheaply made and fall apart easily.

    Quote:
    If you're getting a Z77 motherboard you should pair it with an Ivybridge CPU. Swap that 2700k out for a 3770. It'll run cooler (temperatures will be higher but total heat output is lower due to the small die size). You'll also get the nice RAND extensions and PCIe 3.0.


    Yeah but if gaming is the primary focus (and judging by use of the 690 I'm assuming it is), the 3770 isn't needed. I'm personally a fan of X79 but a lot of the regulars around here will tell you that it's major overkill for a gaming system, but on a $3K+ build, why not?

    Quote:
    Corsair H80 is awesome but H100 is better and you might be able to get it for the same price or less. I got mine for only 90 bucks on sale, take a look around.


    I'm personally not a fan of closed liquid loops. I'd rather go with a D14 or any other strong air fan - you get the same results and it's far safer.

    Try this:

    Case: NZXT Switch 810 - $169.99
    PSU: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MKII 950 - $149.99
    Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth X79 - $319.99
    CPU: 3.2GHz Intel Core i7-3930K - $589.99
    Cooler: Noctua D14 Socket LGA 2011 Edition - $99.99
    RAM: 16GB G.Skill Ares 1600MHz 1.5V - $99.99
    SSD: 256GB Crucial M4 - $199.99
    HD: 2TB Seagate Barracuda Green - $119.99
    Optical: LG Blu Ray Burner - $79.99
    OS: Windows 7 Pro - $139.99
    Video Card: EVGA Geforce GTX 690 - $999.99

    Total: $2,959.89

    I don't include peripherals or monitors on builds as that's all personal preference but that's everything you need and there's no useless accessories or anything else. That card reader on the original build is junk - if you insist on getting a card reader - on a $3K system this is the best on the market: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820176021
  5. Pinhedd said:
    .......Acer is garbage and CCFL TN LCDs are going out of style like its 1999. Get a good Samsung LED instead such as the one below. The monitor market is extremely mature so buying a good one now will last you 5-8 years.

    Would be more accurate to say you do not like CFL(The light source) screens, but this AND your recommendation are BOTH TN. Also, I high recommend checking out screens in the store. Many 2ms monitors have some very bad overdrive artifacts(clearly more visible under certain conditions).

    Not that i will disagree with Acer not being all that great, I have seem bad monitors(Hell 2 Samsung screens from the same series the 22 inch was far better then the 24 in terns of image quality) from almost all the mainstream makers(bad color/banding/poor viewing angles/back light bleeding/overdrive artifacts that are worse then the ghosting it self they try to prevent).

    Just my 2 cents on the CFL vs LED thing(I would say its more down to screen quality then the backlight it self). Now global dimming led, that is anther story(but not for those who want THIN).
  6. The Intel 500 series SSDs are by far the most reliable, meaning that they have the lowest failure rate. They're also the most expensive. The new Intel 500 series uses the same controller as pretty much every other enthusiast SSD on the market, the Sandforce 2281. The difference in performance comes down to what type of flash the drive uses. In real world terms you probably won't notice the difference because any SSD will be a huge boost over any platter drive. I'm a huge fan of the Mushkin Chronos Deluxe series, the prices have crashed recently and the performance is outstanding. Unfortunately the 240GB Chronos Deluxe had an abnormally high failure rate (check the reviews on Newegg) which seems to have been resolved. I've been using a 120GB Chronos for ages but when I ordered a 240 it was faulty on arrival. Mushkin RMAed it right away though and the replacement is running just fine.

    Ivy Bridge is the "Tock" in Intel's Tick-Tock model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Tick-Tock) which means that it's designed to be an all around improvement on Sandybridge. Thus, equivalent models will perform better than their sandybridge counterparts. The biggest constraint appears to be that they're not as easy to overclock; this is typically the case when Intel employs a new manufacturing process.
  7. g-unit1111 said:
    Quote:
    Consider getting a case by a manufacturer other than Thermaltake. The last one I owned was built like a bunker but nothing ever seemed to fit right and the metalwork was a little rough. Keep in mind that you don't even necessarily need to buy a flashy gaming case with a billion fans. Antec makes some amazing workstation midtowers for around the same price. I'm a particular fan of the Antec P183 mid tower and P193 full tower. If you want something that's both stylish and wonderful to work with check out the Corsair cases.


    I agree - Thermaltake is a horrible case manufacturer - we've bought a few where I work and they're so cheaply made and fall apart easily.

    Quote:
    If you're getting a Z77 motherboard you should pair it with an Ivybridge CPU. Swap that 2700k out for a 3770. It'll run cooler (temperatures will be higher but total heat output is lower due to the small die size). You'll also get the nice RAND extensions and PCIe 3.0.


    Yeah but if gaming is the primary focus (and judging by use of the 690 I'm assuming it is), the 3770 isn't needed. I'm personally a fan of X79 but a lot of the regulars around here will tell you that it's major overkill for a gaming system, but on a $3K+ build, why not?

    Quote:
    Corsair H80 is awesome but H100 is better and you might be able to get it for the same price or less. I got mine for only 90 bucks on sale, take a look around.


    I'm personally not a fan of closed liquid loops. I'd rather go with a D14 or any other strong air fan - you get the same results and it's far safer.

    Try this:

    Case: NZXT Switch 810 - $169.99
    PSU: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MKII 950 - $149.99
    Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth X79 - $319.99
    CPU: 3.2GHz Intel Core i7-3930K - $589.99
    Cooler: Noctua D14 Socket LGA 2011 Edition - $99.99
    RAM: 16GB G.Skill Ares 1600MHz 1.5V - $99.99
    SSD: 256GB Crucial M4 - $199.99
    HD: 2TB Seagate Barracuda Green - $119.99
    Optical: LG Blu Ray Burner - $79.99
    OS: Windows 7 Pro - $139.99
    Video Card: EVGA Geforce GTX 690 - $999.99

    Total: $2,959.89

    I don't include peripherals or monitors on builds as that's all personal preference but that's everything you need and there's no useless accessories or anything else. That card reader on the original build is junk - if you insist on getting a card reader - on a $3K system this is the best on the market: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820176021

    Because wasting $ for no benefits is stupid.
  8. Pinhedd said:
    The Intel 500 series SSDs are by far the most reliable, meaning that they have the lowest failure rate. They're also the most expensive. The new Intel 500 series uses the same controller as pretty much every other enthusiast SSD on the market, the Sandforce 2281. The difference in performance comes down to what type of flash the drive uses. In real world terms you probably won't notice the difference because any SSD will be a huge boost over any platter drive. I'm a huge fan of the Mushkin Chronos Deluxe series, the prices have crashed recently and the performance is outstanding. Unfortunately the 240GB Chronos Deluxe had an abnormally high failure rate (check the reviews on Newegg) which seems to have been resolved. I've been using a 120GB Chronos for ages but when I ordered a 240 it was faulty on arrival. Mushkin RMAed it right away though and the replacement is running just fine.

    Ivy Bridge is the "Tock" in Intel's Tick-Tock model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Tick-Tock) which means that it's designed to be an all around improvement on Sandybridge. Thus, equivalent models will perform better than their sandybridge counterparts. The biggest constraint appears to be that they're not as easy to overclock; this is typically the case when Intel employs a new manufacturing process.


    Intel SSDs are *FAR* from reliable and that's mainly due to the junk Sandforce controller they use. I have one and I'm constantly having issues with it, I'm going to be replacing it with a Vertex 4 sometime in the next few months. They're decent SSDs, but there's no way in hell I would rely on them for anything mission cirtical, that's where a drive like an M4 or a Samsung 830 would come in handy.

    Anonymous said:
    Because wasting $ for no benefits is stupid.


    I do agree that the 690 is stupid but I still like X79 on high end builds, that's not going to change.
  9. Just because you like it doesn't mean it's worth it.
  10. Question, is the Noctua NH-D14 ONLY an LGA2011 socket cooler, or will it work with an 1155 socket CPU?
  11. It will work on LGA 1155.
  12. Thank you, azeem. What are your views regarding the H100/H80 vs the NH-D14?
  13. The H100 does perform better, but by 1C or so. The NH-D14 is just fine, but for around the same price as an H100, if you REALLY want WC, get the RASA RS360 kit.
  14. So an NH-D14 is perfectly fine for a first build? No worries about lack of cooling if I get to the point where I -want- to overclock, I'll have the headroom, ya?
  15. Well, the NH-D14 is mainly for temps IMO cuz after 4.5 GHz SB, you see diminishing benefits as you crank the clock.
  16. What are your thoughts on graphics? Do you really think a 690 with a triple monitor resolution in some games will be TOO overkill?
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