Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Printing 8x10's -- is TIFF better?

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
July 20, 2005 7:46:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I want to obtain prints of about 25 pictures I took recently on a
4-megapixel camera. This is raising lots of questions. I hope to find
some good answers here.

1. A book I have says save the pics as TIFF files at 240 pixel
resolution. Since the originals were saved by my camera as JPEG files,
am I accomplishing anything by converting them to TIFF after running
them through Photoshop Elements to increase the resolution to 240 from
72 and to resize the photos to 8x10?

2. Making the photos 8"x10" at 240 res and then saving them as TIFF
files makes each file about 13 megs. Assuming this is a good thing,
where can I have these printed? I can't find any service bureau that
will accept files this size.

3. If I save the files as JPEG files, should I still use Photoshop to
increase resolution to 240 (or some other number)? What's the very
best way to handle a 4-megapixel JPEG original file to achieve a
maximum quality print?

Thanks very much in advance,

Gigi

More about : printing 8x10 tiff

Anonymous
July 20, 2005 8:27:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Gigi writes ...
>
>1. A book I have says save the pics as TIFF files at 240 pixel
>resolution.

You don't "have" to but that's a good practice for printing, especially
if you have a tiff or RAW option in your camera. If you are not
printing then the resolution is irrelevant, only the pixel count is
meaningful.

>Since the originals were saved by my camera as JPEG files,
>am I accomplishing anything by converting them to TIFF

If you are going to edit and save them you are better off converting to
tiff since editing and re-saving jpegs causes the image quality to
degrade, because jpegs are compressed when you save. But if you are
just printing without much editing and re-saving then there's no point
in saving as tiffs. Just don't re-save the jpegs ... what I mean is
you can open the jpeg, edit it and print it without saving as either
jpeg or tiff, then after printing just exit so that your original jpeg
is still in its original form. If you are going to save and re-edit
and save again you will be better off converting to tiff though instead
of repeatedly saving as jpeg, due to the compression each time you
save.

If you are making edits and resampling and then sending a copy to a lab
that requires jpegs then save at the highest jpeg setting.

>after running them through Photoshop Elements to increase the
>resolution to 240 from 72 and to resize the photos to 8x10?

For this you should turn off resampling and just resize ... in Elements
first I would crop the file to the required 4:5 aspect ratio with the
Rectanular Marquee tool (which I think is the 5th tool from the top in
the Tool box), then select 'fixed aspect ratio' option under 'mode' and
draw the selection box. When you have it right do Image > Crop. Now
to change the resolution go to Image > Resize > Image Size and turn off
'resample image' and set width or height to the right number for 8x10"
prints and see what resolution you get ... if it's anywhere close to
240 or higher I'd accept this and not resample. If it's too low (say
below 180 or 200) then check the 'resample image' box, plug in 240 for
'resolution' and change 'bicubic' to 'bicubic smoother' and do the
resampling. If you do NOT resample (if your resolution is high enough)
then you keep the original pixels.

>2. Making the photos 8"x10" at 240 res and then saving them as TIFF
>files makes each file about 13 megs. Assuming this is a good thing,
>where can I have these printed? I can't find any service bureau that
>will accept files this size.

Most of these guys want jpegs, typically in sRGB space. TIFF is better
for saving images on your disk that will be edited or resized but the
basic Wal-Mart and Costco and on-line print shops want jpegs. You may
want to just save the TIFF files and send them a copy saved as a jpeg.

>If I save the files as JPEG files, should I still use Photoshop to
>increase resolution to 240 (or some other number)?

See what you have as a resolution when you resize with 'resample image'
turned off, as described above. You don't want to resample if you can
avoid it.

>What's the very best way to handle a 4-megapixel JPEG original
>file to achieve a maximum quality print?

If you got the exposure and white balance correct in the original image
and don't need to edit much then just crop and, if the printer asks for
it, resample to the desired resolution. Maybe save a copy as a tiff
file if you need to edit it later. If sending to a print shop you
should save at a high jpeg setting .. when you do the jpeg save in
Elements you'll get a 'jpeg options' dialog box so change the 'quality'
setting to something high like 9 - 11 (you can see the file size of the
final image get updated at the bottom of the dialog box).

Bill
July 20, 2005 10:11:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bill and Jim,

Thanks very much for your thorough and expert advice. It's great that
you gave it so quickly too!

Gigi
Related resources
July 21, 2005 3:27:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Gigi" <tthyme42@cox.net> wrote in message
news:1121899587.739990.308390@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I want to obtain prints of about 25 pictures I took recently on a
> 4-megapixel camera. This is raising lots of questions. I hope to find
> some good answers here.
So, your camera makes images that are about 1600 by 2400 pixels..
>
> 1. A book I have says save the pics as TIFF files at 240 pixel
> resolution. Since the originals were saved by my camera as JPEG files,
> am I accomplishing anything by converting them to TIFF after running
> them through Photoshop Elements to increase the resolution to 240 from
> 72 and to resize the photos to 8x10?
Between 200 and 300 works best. That 1600 x 2400 images is almost big
enough to make a good 8x10 as it is.
Now, you need to understand that reading a jpeg file into any imaging
program results in decompression. What you have in memory is then a bitmap
image.
>
> 2. Making the photos 8"x10" at 240 res and then saving them as TIFF
> files makes each file about 13 megs. Assuming this is a good thing,
> where can I have these printed? I can't find any service bureau that
> will accept files this size.
Fine, you have two options
1 ) Buy yourself a printer and do your own printing
2 ) Send them a jpeg.
>
> 3. If I save the files as JPEG files, should I still use Photoshop to
> increase resolution to 240 (or some other number)? What's the very
> best way to handle a 4-megapixel JPEG original file to achieve a
> maximum quality print?
It is easy. Enter the desired image size and the desired pixels per inch.
Then enable bicubic interpolation. PS does the rest.
You will have to crop the image to get it to the aspect ratio of an 8x10.
You can then save the image in whatever format you need. Just don't edit
jpeg files very many times..
Jim
>
> Thanks very much in advance,
>
> Gigi
>
July 21, 2005 5:27:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gigi wrote:


>
> 2. Making the photos 8"x10" at 240 res and then saving them as TIFF
> files makes each file about 13 megs. Assuming this is a good thing,
> where can I have these printed?

No reason to save as tiff for final outside printing. You'll never see the
difference between a high quality jpeg and tiff in their final print. This
is the reason no one accepts files this large, they aren't required. Just
make SURE your image is the same color space as the printer requires/asks
for, most want sRGB. I normally will try a smaller print first requesting
"No corrections!" and see if their output matches what I sent them when
using a new service. If that looks good, than a larger one should look good
as well.

--

Stacey
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 1:09:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gigi wrote:

> I want to obtain prints of about 25 pictures I took recently on a
> 4-megapixel camera. This is raising lots of questions. I hope to find
> some good answers here.
>
> 1. A book I have says save the pics as TIFF files at 240 pixel
> resolution. Since the originals were saved by my camera as JPEG files,
> am I accomplishing anything by converting them to TIFF after running
> them through Photoshop Elements to increase the resolution to 240 from
> 72 and to resize the photos to 8x10?

This achieves absolutely nothing useful and may even damage quality
slightly depending on whether and how Elements resamples the image or if
it just tweaks the ppi field. It makes the files huge too. Leave the
resampling to the printer driver although you may want to choose the
cropping to match the output medium - there are lossless tools to do
this directly on JPEG files.
>
> 2. Making the photos 8"x10" at 240 res and then saving them as TIFF
> files makes each file about 13 megs. Assuming this is a good thing,
> where can I have these printed? I can't find any service bureau that
> will accept files this size.

It is only a good thing if you have shares in disk drive manufacturers.
It makes sense to hold work in progress in a lossless format, but it
gains you nothing at all converting a JPEG to a TIFF with a particular
random number in the pixels per inch slot when almost all printers these
days are automatically scaling images for output. (Zero ppi isn't such a
good idea as some packages crash division by zero)
>
> 3. If I save the files as JPEG files, should I still use Photoshop to
> increase resolution to 240 (or some other number)? What's the very
> best way to handle a 4-megapixel JPEG original file to achieve a
> maximum quality print?

That ppi number will be ignored by almost all final printer software.
Most rescale the image on the fly to match the output medium typically
with a scaling rule that gives a 1% or larger overhang on the paper.
That is empirically what I see using a Fuji Frontier on default settings.

You could always do the experiment. Make one vastly oversize bloated
TIFF file with the supposed "magic" resampled 240ppi setting and an
original JPEG and send them both off for bureau printing.

Regards,
Martin Brown
July 21, 2005 10:16:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thank you all for your replies, advice and information. I'm learning
quickly (though never quickly enough, I suppose!)

Gigi
!