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ENGINEERING SIMULATION RIG

Last response: in Systems
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June 9, 2012 8:52:58 AM

HI GUYS,

to all tommies , a very sincere gratitude for ur suggestions, advise, debate through the years which has helped bring out the best of modern day computing.Sorry for sounding rhetoric...but the fact is that tomshardware forums has helped and helped big...

Now my problem: i want to buid a workstation for myself: the objectives are as follows;

PC will be for engineering simulation, number crunching, data analysis, optimization routines and neural network modelling, data graphing ( DPlot, grapher etc.)
STRICTLY NO gaming
STRICTLY NO overclocking
NO rendering
NO Solidworks , Catia , Or Pro-E Work.

Need a Rock Stable , responsive multitasking platform for heavy multithreaded data crunching .

Budget: approx.: 2500-3000 $ equivalent (in India prices are higher than US prices)

I have had the pleasure of very good suggestions from my brothers at Erodov, Techenclave which has helped to finalize a part of the rig, but there are some issues I need to clarify:

Components already decided:

• Intel I7-3930k
• 32GB (4x 8GB) DDR3 1600 G.SKILL Ripjaws Series
• Seagate Barracuda 7200.14 2TB SATA 6GB/s
• Crucial 256GB m4 2.5 inch SATA 6GBs SSD
• Corsair Carbide 500 R
• Seasonic 660W (SS-660KM)

Needed suggestions on:

Processor Cooling System: no overclocking

Motherboard: stability is the criterion with good voltage management

GPU: Please Advise (Professional Firepro/Quadro Cards Not Required):

Monitor: 23-27 inch options; (I have Asus PA238Q on my mind but 27 inchers are beckoning!!!!)

Thank you all for Ur suggestions in advance.
June 9, 2012 9:09:18 AM

That's a solid build. Nice :) 
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June 9, 2012 9:33:21 AM

HEY THANX;any sugg on the undecided parts> pls help
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June 9, 2012 9:53:24 AM

Out of curiosity would a Xeon not be better for number crunching?
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June 9, 2012 9:56:46 AM

The stock cooler is fine if you arent going to overclock, if you are look at the Coolermaster EVO for about $30. The motherboard isnt really going to change much cept for pricing. Get a z77 chipset, with whatever your needs are already on it. Get an nvidia 670, its a good price and great performance. I use a Hanns-G 28 inch 1920x1200 monitor and I love it. If you cna find one in your country id jump on it. Picked mine up for$239 a few years ago on sale, not sure what they would be in your country.
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June 9, 2012 9:58:37 AM

PRICE/PERFORMANCE RATIO+ not 24*7 rig so going by cpu benches 3930k..xeons are the desirable choice as u rightly point out ..but money needed for other parts.
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June 9, 2012 10:06:04 AM

Looks like you've been keeping an eye on what people here have been recommending to others!

I just got an i7-3930K for myself, so I can let you know what I've found. I picked up a relatively inexpensive CPU cooler that has so far impressed me: the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO for LGA 2011. While I haven't been stressing my system, yet, this cooler hasn't let my CPU temp get over 31C (keep in mind, this is mostly idling, windows update, and the windows experience test). I imagine that it should be able to handle anything that you could throw at it if you're not going to be doing any overclocking.

I chose the Asus P9X79 Deluxe for my build, as I wanted the Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and other flashy features that it provides. It has impressive power control features, and I haven't even gotten through all the tweaking that can be done with this board to get the best performance, efficiency, and quiet out of it. While the Deluxe edition board isn't likely what you are looking for, Asus makes a version of this board specifically for workstations, the Asus P9X79 WS. You might want to check it out on Newegg:

Asus utilizes dual hardware-accelerated Intel NICs, which saves CPU for the number crunching if it will be passing that information along on the LAN. Asus also takes additional care to make sure the board has complete compatibility with RAID and LAN cards.

I'm not sure you'll really care that much about this board, as it does put a lot of emphasis on overclocking features that you don't want, but I've been impressed with the board's equal consideration given to power conservation. Since the Asus P9X79 Deluxe is the only board I have any experience with, it is the only thing I can recommend... I'm sure someone else can give you a better suggestion if you don't need all the features that these boards provide.

As for graphics, do you plan on utilizing Nvidia or AMD GPUs to handle highly-parallel processing? Nvidia's GPUs have fewer 'cores' that are capable of handling more complex operations, while AMDs GPUs have up to 2048 cores that handle simpler operations. While Nvidias GPUs might be better for doing video transcoding (you might want to visit Nvidia's site dedicated to their CUDA programming API), AMDs GPUs are better at handling tasks such as Bitcoin mining and cryptographic processing.

Personally, I have always leaned towards Nvidia's GPUs because I always had better luck with their Windows and Linux drivers. If you plan on using any GPU in Linux for any kind of 2D or 3D acceleration, then I'd go with something by Nvidia.

I don't really have any suggestions for monitors, though I tend to look for Samsung LCDs because I've always liked their color reproduction. That's just a personal preference, though.

Good luck with your build! I'm sure others will chime in with better suggestions. I do know that you will love this CPU when you get your hands on it!

-- Matt
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June 9, 2012 10:08:49 AM

z77??? 3930k in IMHO is lga2011 .... thanx for the cooler and hans g advise looking it up
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June 9, 2012 10:13:51 AM

hi matt....thanx a ton for your time out to reply...been one of the most candid viewpoints...say if i go with asus x79 pro/sabertooth will it be an overkill as compared to intel d9x79to? after all intel boards are known to have good power consumption-efficiency results...thanx again
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June 9, 2012 10:16:56 AM

hi matt , its me again......" Nvidia's GPUs have fewer 'cores' that are capable of handling more complex operations, while AMDs GPUs have up to 2048 cores that handle simpler operations. While Nvidias GPUs might be better for doing video transcoding (you might want to visit Nvidia's site dedicated to their CUDA programming API), AMDs GPUs are better at handling tasks such as Bitcoin mining and cryptographic processing." ---THANKS A LOT ...nobody...i mean nobody nowhere has summarized it so precisely...it answers my indecision...will go with amd radeon as no 2d or 3d rendering is required for me...so which one would do the job a 6850 or 7850? pls advise
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June 9, 2012 10:33:27 AM

Depends on what you need, a 7850 is roughly equal to a 6970 but around twice the price.
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June 9, 2012 5:36:56 PM

needynoob said:
THANKS A LOT ...nobody...i mean nobody nowhere has summarized it so precisely...it answers my indecision...will go with amd radeon as no 2d or 3d rendering is required for me...so which one would do the job a 6850 or 7850? pls advise


I've always used Nvidia GPUs, so I haven't kept up with the performance of AMD's Radeon line. I have only noticed that the people dedicated to mining Bitcoins seem to have done the most benchmarking of GPUs for cryptographic algorithms of any group of people online. You might have a look at their forums, but I'm sure someone here can give you an idea of what is worth the cost. Since I have always been more interested in gaming and hardware acceleration of graphics and video software, I have always chosen Nvidia (I bought an EVGA GTX 470 SuperClocked when the 400-series first came out, and I haven't needed to follow GPU specs or benchmarking since then).

-- Matt
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