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Will this psu work on my pc?

Last response: in Components
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October 7, 2012 10:46:25 PM

Hello I got a corsair gs800 will it be compatible with my hp p6-2143w?

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Corsair+-+Gaming+Series+800...;jsessionid=D8BDFC5DCE6E19D8FA501B021623D806.bbolsp-app02-25?id=1218631401192&skuId=5297716&st=gs800&cp=1&lp=1#tabbed-customerreviews

HP Pavilion p6-2143w
SPECS:

AMD Quad-Core A6-3650 accelerated processor
2.60GHz, 4MB Cache

8GB DDR3 SDRAM system memory

1TB SATA hard drive

AMD Radeon HD 6530D Discrete Graphics
With up to 4084MB total available graphics memory as allocated by Windows 7

XFX - Radeon HD 6570 1GB DDR3 PCI Express Graphics Card

Motherboard
AAHD2-HY (Holly2)
Manufacturer: Pegatron
Form factor: 24.4 cm (9.6 inches) x 24.4 cm (9.6 inches)
Chipset: AMD A55
Memory sockets: 2 x DDR3
Front side bus speeds: 100 MHz UMI (Unified Media Interface)
Processor socket: FM1
Expansion Slots:
1 PCI Express x16 (Gen 2.0)
3 PCI Express x1 (Gen 2.0)
1 PCI Express Mini Card
Internal 300W (100V-240V)
Form factor: Internal ATX

Power supply
Total wattage: 300W
Nominal input voltage range: 200-240V/3A (50-60Hz)
Dimensions: 150mm x 140mm x 86mm (5.9 x 5.5 x 3.4 inches)

Computer Case
Mini-tower
Height: 36.8 cm (14.4 inches)
Width: 16.5 cm (6.4 inches)
Depth: 38.9 cm (15.3 inches)
Weight: 8 Kg (17.6 lbs) - without packaging

More about : psu work

a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2012 12:36:58 AM

Look at the back of the computer, if it looks like the power cord port is in the same place on the PSU as it is on the case then it will almost definitely work.

However, it will be massive overkill and efficiency will be low. A lower wattage PSU would put the usage closer to the 50% mark where the greatest amount of wattage drawn from the wall is delivered to the components.

I would be looking more at a 500w - 600w than an 800w.
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October 8, 2012 12:53:39 AM

Ok i got the psu for really cheap. Im trying to upgrade to a good graphics card. If i use this psu will it cause any harm or slow my computer down at all?
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October 8, 2012 12:57:25 AM

The PSU should be overkill for any single gpu setup but yeah you should be fine. I have never heard of any computer being damage by having too large a power supply. It's a corsair too so you know that it is good quality.
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October 8, 2012 1:20:25 AM

thor220 said:
The PSU should be overkill for any single gpu setup but yeah you should be fine. I have never heard of any computer being damage by having too large a power supply. It's a corsair too so you know that it is good quality.

Sorry for being a newb but by overkill you guy mean my computer wont use all the power that the psu has?
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a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2012 1:40:25 AM

Yes, that is what he means. If you have more than you will ever use it doesn't damage components.

At best it will run inefficiently and suffer in longevity.
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October 8, 2012 2:02:57 AM

ok so i took it out the box and it dont look like it will fit. Is my case to small?
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a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2012 2:12:37 AM

Quite possibly. OEM PC makers often do things to screw with the buyers and to try and make sure they have to come back to the company's own parts store for (high priced) upgrades and replacement hardware.

I wouldn't put it past HP to design their cases not to be able to hold standard sized PSUs, not even one bit.

One of the first things people usually have to do when trying to upgrade from OEM computers is to get new cases. Every single OEM case I have ever seen sucks royally. There isn't one that I have seen that allows for good airflow, good cooling, and that sort of thing.
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October 8, 2012 2:17:48 AM

Raiddinn said:
Quite possibly. OEM PC makers often do things to screw with the buyers and to try and make sure they have to come back to the company's own parts store for (high priced) upgrades and replacement hardware.

I wouldn't put it past HP to design their cases not to be able to hold standard sized PSUs, not even one bit.

One of the first things people usually have to do when trying to upgrade from OEM computers is to get new cases. Every single OEM case I have ever seen sucks royally. There isn't one that I have seen that allows for good airflow, good cooling, and that sort of thing.

Thanks for the Help.Is there any cheap case that would fit my motherboard that you would recommend? Or is there anything that i need to look for when buying a compatible case? Or are most cases universal?
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2012 2:31:01 AM

Pretty much all cases marketed directly to consumers are universal cases.

For that matter, pretty much every computer part marketed directly to consumers uses a universal mount.

Any PSU you buy at Micro Center should fit any case you buy at Micro Center, for instance.

However, as I mentioned before, OEM PC makers often try hard to make sure you cannot use these parts.

They make non-universal cases, non-universal PSUs, non-universal motherboards, and all that stuff.

I can't guarantee your motherboard can use universal mounts.

You would have to know the form factor of your motherboard and that is generally a very difficult thing to figure out, because OEM PC makers generally try as hard as possible to obscure that kind of information from you.

If you can get a part number for your motherboard (somehow) you can probably look up sellers offering replacement motherboards of that type and they would probably have information listed that wouldn't be shown on the company's own webpages, like the form factor.

DELL, for instance, uses BTX motherboards sometimes and you would need a case that was capable of mounting BTX motherboards. Most motherboards aren't BTX, but that's how DELL likes it, because most direct to consumer cases aren't designed for BTX.

All it is is a matter of drilling holes into a pane of metal differently, though, so its usually not a problem for case makers to just drill holes for every possible motherboard form factor if that's what they want to do. Some just don't think enough people will want to use BTX motherboards with their cases, though, and don't waste the time doing it.

Anyway, I have done too much of that kind of research in my career to really want to do it now, so I will leave the research portion up to you or other posters here. I am just giving the tools to get you on the right track at this moment.

I will tell you, though, that the HAF 912 is a really good low end value case. Lots of bang for not very many bucks as far as cases go. If you are going to be in the market for a new case, that wouldn't be a bad place to start looking. It has great cooling features and generally it's just a great case for almost anybody.

Once you find out the type of motherboard you have (ATX/BTX/etc) you might want to go directly to that case and see if it can be mounted in it.
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October 8, 2012 2:55:40 AM

Thank you. I have found out that my MB form factor is uATX. And after some research if Im correct uATX is the same as micro ATX and the HAF 912 says its compatible with micro ATX. I think I found my case thank you.
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October 8, 2012 3:04:27 AM

Best answer selected by THUGLIFE505.
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