Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

System or driver - boot issues

Last response: in Systems
Share
June 10, 2012 11:37:47 PM

I have 2x 64GB SSDs (Crucial M4 SATA III) and a 500GB WD hard drive. Installing Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) 64bit from a USB stick on all hard drives fail on the bootloader step. I have tried installing with my SATA configured for RAID 0 (with just the two SSDs) via a hardware controller on board the mobo, and in AHCI mode. Regardless of how I do it, I seem to have problems with the bootloader. I also cannot seem to install Windows 7 on my system, it rarely sees my mass storage devices -- I've tried doing this from a DVD and from USB. When it does see them, it can install, but after ~1 hour of running, BSoDs, so ultimately I cannot get anything stable going. I have replaced nearly every component of my system save the processor, memory, and the hard drives, and continue to experience this problem.

I should note that another confusing point is when it doesn't see hard drives to install Windows on, I can "load drivers" (which always fails to see any relevant drivers), but that lets me browse my system and I can actually see my DVD drive, any USB sticks, and my 500gb hard drive. Yet it won't let me install on it. Weirdest thing ever to me...

It is worth noting that I used to have a stable Win7 Pro 64bit installation on my SSDs in RAID 0 for quite some time, and then spontaneously started having the BSoD problem every hour. I turned to Ubuntu to try and determine if it was just a Windows driver issue or a hardware issue. Then I realized I didn't know nearly enough about Ubuntu to figure this out anyway.

I was a n00b and didn't know how to use the BSoD information when the problem first crept up, and when I have a Win7 installation "running", it's been while I've messed around on Audit mode. These BSoDs only flash across the screen, and the system immediately reboots.

Ultimately, I want Windows back and running on my system. I guess what I've narrowed down to myself is that I've either got a bad processor (although I can run Ubuntu off a USB stick with no issues whatsoever, which discredits this idea), I've got bad SSDs (which seems unlikely that both would crap out at the same time, plus I have problems with the 500gb drive too sometimes), ALL my drives went bad (which seems extremely unlikely), or Win7 *and* Ubuntu are having very odd problems.

I've been trying to work this out for over 4 weeks now, and all the situations and information I've collected is starting to blur in my head. So if I left out pertinent information, my mistake, and just ask!
a b B Homebuilt system
June 10, 2012 11:51:34 PM

Hi, if the "via a hardware controller on board the mobo," is one of the intel raid chipsets then this is a combination of hw and sw raid and you may not have the right support in the USB drive you are using as a boot loader.

suggest (assuming you will do a destructive test, and that your goal is a win7 build)

(1) make sure sata ports are set to raid ("raid ready" or whatever)
(2) remove all drives except 1 SSD
(3) make sure SSDs have most recent firmware. (SSDs are buggy as all heck) Make sure the SSDs pass whatever stand-alone boot-able test the manufacturer supplies. Do this one at a time for each SSD.
(4) With only one SSD in the system, install win7 to the one SSD. No other drives in system. bring system up. verify system is good. verify you are using intel RST driver. If not download and install the driver.
(5) install second SSD.
(6) use intel RST driver to create raid0 array
(7) verify system is good
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
June 11, 2012 12:12:06 AM

Use only one stick of RAM. or better yet run Memtest overnight.
m
0
l
Related resources
June 11, 2012 4:37:38 AM

anonymous1 said:
Use only one stick of RAM. or better yet run Memtest overnight.


I've run various memtests and they've checked out just fine -- although none took overnight to complete.
m
0
l
June 11, 2012 4:43:50 AM

tsnor said:
Hi, if the "via a hardware controller on board the mobo," is one of the intel raid chipsets then this is a combination of hw and sw raid and you may not have the right support in the USB drive you are using as a boot loader.

suggest (assuming you will do a destructive test, and that your goal is a win7 build)

(1) make sure sata ports are set to raid ("raid ready" or whatever)
(2) remove all drives except 1 SSD
(3) make sure SSDs have most recent firmware. (SSDs are buggy as all heck) Make sure the SSDs pass whatever stand-alone boot-able test the manufacturer supplies. Do this one at a time for each SSD.
(4) With only one SSD in the system, install win7 to the one SSD. No other drives in system. bring system up. verify system is good. verify you are using intel RST driver. If not download and install the driver.
(5) install second SSD.
(6) use intel RST driver to create raid0 array
(7) verify system is good


Being an AMD system, I do not have an intel raid chipset. The RAID is supported by the mobo southbridge which is an AMD SB950 controller.

Could you elaborate on your step 3 please? Not sure how to go about that.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
June 12, 2012 3:56:06 AM

"Could you elaborate on your step 3 please? Not sure how to go about that. "
"(3) make sure SSDs have most recent firmware. (SSDs are buggy as all heck) Make sure the SSDs pass whatever stand-alone boot-able test the manufacturer supplies. Do this one at a time for each SSD. "

To Update firmware on an SSD go to the drive manufacturer support page for your product and see what firmware exists. Follow the download and install process. I think this is your page, but you shoudl confirm: http://www.crucial.com/support/firmware.aspx

Crucial has a tool somewhere to check out the ssd, but i didn't see it in a quick check on google. Maybe use hdtune or similar instead to pull the smart data. (google smart data, it's disk predictive fail stuff and pretty standard).
m
0
l
!