Cpu running too cold

hii i have intel core 2 quad q9300 and from the past few days my cpu is running too cold,intel desktop utilities is showing my cpu thermal margin around 10 degree celsius and sometimes it drops to 1 degree,please help before i damage my cpu
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  1. Well firstly thats impossible with air cooling unless your room is sub 10C. I would imagine that the utility is not showing the correct temperature. Download HWinfo64 or CoreTemp and it should tell you the correct temp. What does BIOS say?

    I wouldnt worry unless you are worried about the temps getting too hot. one of those programmes should tell you correctly though
  2. First of all, intel desktop utilities is probably just reading a sensor wrong.

    This is incredibly easy to tell - put your hand over the air exit. If it isn't almost as cold as an ice cube, the sensor is broken.

    Secondly, there's no such thing as running "too cold." Computers aren't like cars - they LIKE being cold. If they didn't, then why would overclockers get extreme numbers using liquid nitrogen?
  3. The colder that a processor get the easier it is for the electrons to travel on the chip meaning that the processor can run faster with less heat generated by resistance of the material in the processor.
  4. DarkSable said:
    Secondly, there's no such thing as running "too cold." Computers aren't like cars - they LIKE being cold. If they didn't, then why would overclockers get extreme numbers using liquid nitrogen?

    Cold, yes. But not TOO cold.

    Somewhere between -200C and -230C junction temperature, hole mobility in silicon starts slowing down and causes transistors to start switching more slowly which increases switching losses and prevent the cores from getting much colder than that without compromising operation. Forcing colder temperatures than that this "freezing point" would actually degrade overclocking results.
  5. InvalidError said:
    Cold, yes. But not TOO cold.

    Somewhere between -200C and -230C junction temperature, hole mobility in silicon starts slowing down and causes transistors to start switching more slowly which increases switching losses and prevent the cores from getting much colder than that without compromising operation. Forcing colder temperatures than that this "freezing point" would actually degrade overclocking results.

    lol, you got a point there, but unless going for overclocking past 8 ghz, who would in a right mind use liquid nitrogen/hydrogen/ or any gen, for normal usage? :pt1cable:
  6. 1depp1 said:
    lol, you got a point there, but unless going for overclocking past 8 ghz, who would in a right mind use liquid nitrogen/hydrogen/ or any gen, for normal usage? :pt1cable:

    Quite true.

    Even when overclocking, overclocking records are held by CPUs with 50-75% of their cores disabled. Great single-threaded performance but for multitasking, the 8GHz extreme overclock ends up marginally better than a 4GHz quad-core.
  7. how is it for performance?
  8. FYI: Computer parts can never, ever be cooler than room temperature (ambient), unless you're using liquid nitrogen or something.
  9. do u have the latest bios, drivers etc?
  10. gregaaron89 said:
    FYI: Computer parts can never, ever be cooler than room temperature (ambient), unless you're using liquid nitrogen or something.

    LN2 is a 'little' extreme. In the ole days of 5-30W CPUs, people often use thermo-electric modules for their esoteric cooling/overclocking needs which made it possible to run the CPU ~5C below ambient without too much work. Phase-changed cooling was the next step up and enabled sub-0C temperatures but a lot more setup work around the CPU socket.

    Today though, not many people are interested in that degree of esoteric operational cooling and all the extra work it requires. I suspect this is in large part due to much higher CPU powers combined with much higher stock performance that make the endeavor both far more expensive and unnecessary for most people who might have been interested in it 10 years ago.
  11. here is the hardware monitor snapshot,

    http://i1288.photobucket.com/albums/b494/kunal08soni/Capture_zps1e70d5b3.jpg

    is my cpu running ok?
  12. helo there brother, firstly, i think -26C is wrong.. i think the motherboard temp sensor is wrong.

    secondly, i think 100C max temp is too high for my liking. i think you should invest in a new aftermarket cpu cooler like the cm hyper 212 evo which is really cheap.

    on the other hand, i think your 2+ year old cpu is starting to show it's age... :(
  13. my CPU is completely cold could it mean no power going through to it from my power supply
  14. InvalidError said:
    DarkSable said:
    Secondly, there's no such thing as running "too cold." Computers aren't like cars - they LIKE being cold. If they didn't, then why would overclockers get extreme numbers using liquid nitrogen?

    Cold, yes. But not TOO cold.

    Somewhere between -200C and -230C junction temperature, hole mobility in silicon starts slowing down and causes transistors to start switching more slowly which increases switching losses and prevent the cores from getting much colder than that without compromising operation. Forcing colder temperatures than that this "freezing point" would actually degrade overclocking results.


    We are talking temperatures within the realm of normality. Not absolute zero....
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