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Pagefile Issues

Last response: in Windows 7
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January 26, 2012 2:32:43 AM

Hey there,

I've been having issues lately with my pagefile on my W7 desktop.

I originally disabled the pagefile since it was taking up too much space on my SSD and I didn't really need it (have 16GB RAM, 64GB SSD). However, within the last week it created a "temporary pagefile" that I can't get rid of and it keeps bugging me. I managed to get it to move to the secondary hard drive, but it still ate up all my free space with a 7.3GB file that I can't delete from my SSD (that was the space I had left over to prevent drive issues, like you're supposed to).

Any ideas on how to fix this?

More about : pagefile issues

a c 209 $ Windows 7
January 26, 2012 3:11:24 AM

The file isn't called "hiberfil.sys" is it? That can't be moved to another drive and the only way to eliminate it is to disable hibernation.
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January 26, 2012 3:58:51 AM

No, I have hibernation disabled already. It's the pagefile.sys file on my C: drive.

Here's the data from WinDirStat, and the current setting of my virtual memory. As you can see, the pagefile is disabled on the C drive but still exists.





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a b $ Windows 7
January 26, 2012 7:34:52 AM

How to Clear the Windows Paging File at Shutdown

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314834

Enable page for 4GB, it is going to help to the system. Don't just disable it. It will run smoother.
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January 26, 2012 12:11:54 PM

I've tried that numerous times, but gave it a shot again anyway since I had gotten the error message to leave me alone when I moved the pagefile to the E: drive.

...and of course:
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January 26, 2012 12:13:10 PM

Just as a note it's registering a total page file size of 32GB (I think the one on the E: drive still exists even though I told it to go away this time).

Going to try turning it on on both drives and turning it off again - might just be an error since it has about half a page file on the C drive.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
January 26, 2012 3:15:11 PM

According to this post:

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/window...

...one person solved his problem by consolidating two partitions into one on his OS drive so that there was more free space in his OS partition. If you're running on the edge in terms of free space in that partition it might be something you need to look into...

Edit - here's another guy who had the same problem and fixed it the same way:

http://planet10tech.com/2011/11/fixing-windows-created-...
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January 26, 2012 3:50:00 PM

I found out that since this paging file issue sprung up, I can't restart my computer (just infinitely hangs at the "Shutting Down" page with the spinny wheel. :/ 

However, I did manage to get it to create a full 16GB file on both the C and E drives, and just now got it to back down the one on the C drive to 4GB. The E drive one still exists but it should go away next time I shut it down.
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January 27, 2012 3:20:36 AM

Hi,

Please note, it is not recommended to eliminate the use of the paging file entirely but you can most definitely reduce the size. For more information on this you may want to defer to the following Microsoft resource “Change the size of virtual memory” (paging file).

Should you require additional space after the paging file / virtual memory reduction, I would also recommend the Microsoft Knowledge Base article “Disabling the use of hibernation” as an additional method of increasing available disk space.

The following is to be considered additional information which could be useful for those who also utilize an SSD and space is a very relevant concern.

Although the below is not advised nor is it recommended, there are a few additional steps one can perform in an effort to reduce the disk footprint of Windows 7.

As you will see in the second reference link, Debbie, a Microsoft Answers Support Engineer, does state, “Changing permissions on or compressing the WinSxS folder can cause problems when installing an OS hotfix and installation/un-installation of any Win32 assemblies.” Please keep that in mind when making any unsupported alterations to your Windows 7 system configuration.

Reducing the Disk Footprint for Windows 7

• "Windows 7 - How do I cleanup winsxs folder to free up space on SSD drives?"

• "I want to delete the hiberfil.sys to save some disk space."

In general, Solid State Drives perform very well within a Windows 7 environment. There is also a great MSDN blog post discussing the Support and Q&A for Solid-State Drives that may prove beneficial.

In addition, Microsoft has a Microsoft PowerPoint deck detailing the Windows 7 Enhancements for Solid-State Drives that you may also find interesting.

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
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January 27, 2012 3:03:42 PM

Quote:
Please note, it is not recommended to eliminate the use of the paging file entirely but you can most definitely reduce the size. For more information on this you may want to defer to the following Microsoft resource “Change the size of virtual memory” (paging file).

Should you require additional space after the paging file / virtual memory reduction, I would also recommend the Microsoft Knowledge Base article “Disabling the use of hibernation” as an additional method of increasing available disk space.


I've been running without a pagefile or a hiberfile for some time (basically the past year and a half) without any issues. It's only just recently that the pagefile started causing problems, and I believe it is the reason that it is preventing me from shutting down my computer normally (I have to use my power button).

I'm going to run a registry clear to see if it helps anything (also haven't run one in a while).

Quote:
The following is to be considered additional information which could be useful for those who also utilize an SSD and space is a very relevant concern.

Although the below is not advised nor is it recommended, there are a few additional steps one can perform in an effort to reduce the disk footprint of Windows 7.


I don't need to do any of these since I've been managing the drive size up to this point. I'd rather not mess with the Windows files since something will probably go wrong and I'd rather not have to reinstall Windows and my programs.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 27, 2012 6:13:22 PM

I still don't know why people want the pagefile off; you eat up MORE memory that way, since any commit has to be backed by RAM [rather by using RAM ONLY when data is actually written to]...

Secondly, Virtual Memory != Pagefile. You can never shut down or change the size of Virtual Memroy. Period. You can get rid of the page file and elminate paging, but even with the pagefile disabled, all allocations are still handled via the Virtual Memory subsystem [just matched to physical RAM addresses at a 1:1 rate].
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January 27, 2012 6:47:18 PM

gamerk316 said:
I still don't know why people want the pagefile off; you eat up MORE memory that way, since any commit has to be backed by RAM [rather by using RAM ONLY when data is actually written to]...


I have 16GB RAM and tend not to use it all. It's more beneficial for me to have greater SSD space rather than a paging file if the RAM just handles it all.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 27, 2012 6:51:00 PM

boiler1990 said:
I have 16GB RAM and tend not to use it all. It's more beneficial for me to have greater SSD space rather than a paging file if the RAM just handles it all.

Even if u turn it off, windows will make a page if needed.
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January 27, 2012 7:26:04 PM

Hi,

In my search for a resolution to your issue, I found these two articles on TechNet which address the error message you have been receiving:

You receive an error message after you put the page file on another drive other than the drive C in a guest operating system
Error Message: Your System Has No Paging File, or the Paging File Is Too Small

Neither of these scenarios explicitly duplicate yours, however they both illustrate that the error you are experiencing occurs when the location of the page file is inaccessible. In the articles above this is caused when a drive is either not connected at boot or permission issues exist in relation to an NTFS file system.

To resolve the error you are experiencing, I recommend you attempt to restore your system to its original, recommended configuration for the page file, where there is a system managed file located on drive C. Upon confirming that the paging file functions properly and system functionality such as the ability to restart is restored, you could then proceed with the configuration you ultimately desire.

There is an excellent blog on TechNet which discusses the Page File, its merits, and its configuration located here. This blog might help you to discover at what point your page file configuration is improperly configured and how to restore it to proper functionality.

Again, as noted in the Windows Support article on modifying your virtual memory Microsoft strongly recommends that you do not disable or delete your paging file. Among other reasons if you disable the paging file and Windows encounters a system error, it may be unable to recover details regarding that error. I understand you have been operating successfully without the paging file for quite some time however I must note that it is not advised to do so.

If you have already resolved your paging file issue, you may disregard the above recommendation. However, the following is to address the issue of Windows 7 hanging on restart / shutdown. You may find the TechNet forum thread “Windows 7 hangs on shutting down screen” helpful. If the restart / shutdown issue persists after following the steps outlined the forum thread by Linda Yan of Microsoft, you may still choose to try the above paging file recommendation as a troubleshooting step as both the paging file and failure to restart issues appeared to have originated simultaneously based on your posts.

Jessica
Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
January 27, 2012 7:53:41 PM

gamerk316 said:
I still don't know why people want the pagefile off; you eat up MORE memory that way, since any commit has to be backed by RAM [rather by using RAM ONLY when data is actually written to]...
The page file exists to supply backing store when the amount of RAM requested by programs isn't physically available. It was pretty much mandatory for many years because people almost always needed more memory to run programs than was available in a typical computer system. And as it turned out, some older poorly-written programs would refuse to work if there was no pagefile.

Today memory is so cheap that 10's of GBs are affordable. When you have more physical RAM in your system than all your programs running at the same time under the most demanding conditions will ever ask for, there literally isn't any need for a pagefile, so there's no reason to have one. I've been running without a pagefile for 2-1/2 years now with no ill effects whatsoever.

nikorr said:
Even if u turn it off, windows will make a page if needed.


Actually, that's not true. When got my current system I wanted to see what would happen if I filled up my memory when the system didn't have a pagefile to work with. So I wrote a program that would continue requesting memory pages until free RAM was exhausted. What Windows does is to throw up a dialogue box saying that it's out of memory - this identifies the program that's consuming the most RAM and gives you the option of cancelling it. Other programs continue to run unless they also request more memory, at which point they freeze. The system does NOT create a pagefile under these circumstances.

If you choose to cancel the offending program then its memory is freed and other programs that have been waiting on RAM resume operation. The system picks up and carries on as normal with no ill effects (other than the culprit having been cancelled).
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February 5, 2012 11:21:57 PM

Best answer selected by boiler1990.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 6, 2012 2:33:24 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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