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Why win 98se not seeing new HD??

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July 4, 2001 7:42:11 PM

I just installed a new IBM 40 gig drive. Jumpers came pre-set to master. Installed it at the middle (master) connection of the 80 pin cable. Set jumper on old drive to slave. Connected the old drive at the end of the cable. BIOS sees the new 41 gig drive as the primary drive, so I am guessing that the connection is good (red wire closest to power and jumpers). I can boot from the floppy or the secondary hard drive, but the system sees no new 41 gig drive. Operating system detects a bunch of numbers with an ERxxxxxxxxxxxxx as it is detecting hard drives. I think that may be some error message. Slave drive working fine - but Win98 thinks it is C: and there is no other hard drive.

Any ideas as to what I am doing wrong. This is my first new hard drive install on my own here.

Thanks in advance!

More about : win 98se

July 4, 2001 9:54:06 PM

Master to the end of the cable!
Slave in the middle!
Blue connector (if there is one) must be plugged into mobo.


<b>
"Now drop your weapons or I'll kill him with this deadly jelly baby." :wink:
</b>
July 4, 2001 10:57:48 PM

Tried that. Also tried just using the end of the cable and the middle of the cable with no slave drive and also swapping for another identical drive. My old "slave" drive works on either of the two connectors.

Device manager sees both drives as Generic IDE Type 47, but of course, only the slave has a letter from the operating system. So I think the hardware is attached OK. Is there something I need to do with WIN 98SE to get it to recognize a 40 gig drive??
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July 4, 2001 11:21:05 PM

Double check all connections and jumpers.
What is happening in the auto-detect in BIOS?

<b>
"Now drop your weapons or I'll kill him with this deadly jelly baby." :wink:
</b>
July 4, 2001 11:36:10 PM

Checked connections.

BIOS auto detect looks great!
Shows everything as it should be (I think). Shows 41,xxxMB, 16 heads, etc. etc.
July 5, 2001 12:04:45 AM

It sounds like you haven't partitioned and formated the new drive. Boot from the windows startup disk and when you get to the A: prompt, type FDISK. You should then see the new drive listed along with the old drive. You should be able to distinguish one from the other by the capacity indicated.

If you have never run FDISK before, this is an outline of what you need to do: I am assuming that the new drive will be recognized as D:. Select the correct drive; create a primary DOS partition. When you are asked for the size you may use the total capacity of the drive. Follow the prompts. After the partition is created make it the active partition and quit FDISK. Reboot the computer with the startup disk. When you get the A: prompt you want to format the new drive. Again, assuming it is D: then type FORMAT D: and follow the prompts. Make sure that you don't format your OLD DRIVE.
When the format is complete, remove the startup floppy and reboot...Windows should now see the new drive.

Let us know if this solves the problem.

I wonder...what is the speed of gravity?
July 5, 2001 12:41:27 AM

This is further commentary on the new HDD.

If you are planning to install windows on the new HDD, I suggest that you create a primary partition of 4GB for Windows and program files, and an extended partition with the remainder of the drive. You can then create one or more logical drives in the extended partion for data files. This will make it easier if you have to reformat and reinstall windows, because you won't have to worry about your data files. It also saves time when you defrag the drive containing Windows. You usually don't have to defrag drives containing just data files very often.

I wonder...what is the speed of gravity?
July 5, 2001 3:04:09 PM

Thanks SPDY! FDISK did the trick. There were a few additional problems, but I finally got it up. The IBM tested very fast; Sandra Disk Score of 27090. Also greatly improved my Winbench 2001 score.

****Does anyone know a good resource for instructions on FDISK, FORMAT, Loading Windows and drivers?****
July 5, 2001 3:18:56 PM

You can use the Microsoft site or do an internet search on a keyword like 'fdisk' or 'format'. Works for me.

I wonder...what is the speed of gravity?
July 7, 2001 5:00:57 AM

Originally posted by HarleyMYK:<b>...
****Does anyone know a good resource for instructions on FDISK, FORMAT, Loading Windows and drivers?****</b>

You can obtain the answers for your questions also:
When in DOS type and hit <ENTER>:
FDISK /?
FORMAT /?

Read *.txt (README) files on Windows installation CD.
Better to read from Windows session, but it's possible from DOS olso. Just type and <enter>:
DIR E:\*.TXT /S
where E (might differ) is the letter for your CD-ROM
then for any file (with it's path if the file isn't in your recent default {root} directory) from the list, for example type and hit <enter>:
TYPE E:\README.TXT |MORE
July 7, 2001 5:44:09 AM

It doesn't matter where you put the drives, whether in the middle or end, because the jumpers tells the BIOS which is slave and master.

<font color=blue>Your mouse moved. WINDOWS NT must restart for changes to take affect. Restart Now?[OK]</font color=blue>
July 7, 2001 5:46:43 AM

<A HREF="http://www.pcmech.com/byopc/step/25/" target="_new">here</A> is a good guide to formatting and partitioning hard drives.

<font color=blue>Your mouse moved. WINDOWS NT must restart for changes to take affect. Restart Now?[OK]</font color=blue>
July 7, 2001 9:12:34 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Stick_e_Mouse: <b>
here is a good guide to formatting and partitioning hard drives.

Your mouse moved. WINDOWS NT must restart for changes to take affect. Restart Now?[OK] </b>

Holly cow! You’re kidding, Stick_e_Mouse, of course?
Sorry, Stick_e_Mouse, have you read this material you recommend? Have you tried what you recommend others?
That site, it starts directly from mistakes. For example, FDISK [/STATUS]/X is the right format, not what they show. What’s the heck FDISK /Drive? Never works this way.
I could agree with FORMAT /S, creating of Autoexec.bat with CD drivers, but from the end of the last century people use simpler solutions. Start-Up disks for Win95/98 with CD recognition, or just boot from CD. No more time consuming routine and redundancy. Clean install is always the best.
Sorry, there's more confusing at that site. Their initial recommendations are the same for Win95 and Win98. Why do they need Autoexec.bat for Win98 installation? If they want to follow a classic procedure, they must provide FDISK /MBR before FORMAT also as required then. And so on.
Excuse me, may be I'm wrong, but for me that site looks out-of-dated and not good for use.
I think, trying to deliver help faster, we refer to a site with obvious recommendations, but we trust their authors too much. We even don't think about a possibility of not only mistakes (nobody's perfect), but also controversial conceptual approach in such simple material.


<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by NickM on 07/07/01 11:25 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
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