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Cpu with graphics

Hi all,

I have been trying to put together a reliable workstation for video editing. I thought the 3930k and either the x79 or extreme9 would do the trick. However after reading the HORROR threads about the performance. lock-ups and tweaking to get them running. I am not so sure about those anymore. I am a novice builder intermediate editor.

I bought a nvidia quadro 4000 card to use. That is done.

I am looking at this card http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116501
I7-3770k but it has a graphic card in it, I think? Will that conflict or will it 'crossfire'?

Also if you know of a MOBO that has 2 -16 pci slots for a later gtx580 card to add, or a gtx680 still thinking for down the road on that one... Please paste one in if you have a suggestioni. I like Workstations boards as I was sold on the idea that they get a bit more testing before shipped. How true that is?? I would like to have a built in IEEE for stop animation as well.

Software is Adobe CS6 and Adobe Media Composer BTW....

Figured SSD for C&D drive and a 7200 RAID for storage... Your thoughts?
14 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about graphics
  1. No, when you use a discrete (plug-in) graphics card and plug the monitor into that card any onboard video is disabled. Most CPUs nowadays include graphics but it won't conflict with the optional upgrade to a card.
  2. How about a dual 16 pci board? Thanks for the reply on the onboard graphics and plugging in a stand alone or discreet.
  3. Best answer
    Nothing to be worried about IMO. As long as you plug in your DVI cable (or any type of video-output/input cable you have on hand) into your Graphics Card, the onboard GPU won't conflict with anything.

    As for motherboards, here are a few recommendations from what you said in your first post :)

    ASUS P8Z77-V - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131820&name=Intel-Motherboards

    MSI Z77A-G65 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130643&name=Intel-Motherboards

    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128558&name=Intel-Motherboards

    These boards all feature PCI-E 3.0 16x, 8x. 16x for single card configurations, and two 8x slots for 2 card configurations.

    Since the PCI-E slots are all PCI-E 3.0, you essentially get double the bandwidth of what they're rated for. (PCI-E 3.0 8x = PCI-E 2.0 16x) No GPU on the market at the moment can effectively saturate PCI-E 3.0 16x so you're not losing out on any performance.

    If the GPU's you're looking to use only support PCI-E 2.0, however, then you're going to get the rated speeds of 8x and 8x respectively. Not to fear, however, since 16x vs 8x won't give you too many performance limitations.


    **EDIT**

    On a side note, what kind of horror stories have you heard about X79? It's a great platform if you're going to be working with video editing the majority of the time. The 2 extra cores and 4 threads you get from the 3930k will help A LOT with your productivity :)
  4. mocchan said:
    Nothing to be worried about IMO. As long as you plug in your DVI cable (or any type of video-output/input cable you have on hand) into your Graphics Card, the onboard GPU won't conflict with anything.

    As for motherboards, here are a few recommendations from what you said in your first post :)

    ASUS P8Z77-V - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131820&name=Intel-Motherboards

    MSI Z77A-G65 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130643&name=Intel-Motherboards

    Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128558&name=Intel-Motherboards

    These boards all feature PCI-E 3.0 16x, 8x. 16x for single card configurations, and two 8x slots for 2 card configurations.

    Since the PCI-E slots are all PCI-E 3.0, you essentially get double the bandwidth of what they're rated for. (PCI-E 3.0 8x = PCI-E 2.0 16x) No GPU on the market at the moment can effectively saturate PCI-E 3.0 16x so you're not losing out on any performance.

    If the GPU's you're looking to use only support PCI-E 2.0, however, then you're going to get the rated speeds of 8x and 8x respectively. Not to fear, however, since 16x vs 8x won't give you too many performance limitations.


    **EDIT**

    On a side note, what kind of horror stories have you heard about X79? It's a great platform if you're going to be working with video editing the majority of the time. The 2 extra cores and 4 threads you get from the 3930k will help A LOT with your productivity :)


    I have been researching the x79 as I too thought for about 400 bucks more 'over-all' that I would be running a solid computer that will keep up with all the new upgrades etc..Along with having two extra cores.
    The horror stories I am reading about are under motherboard section here as well as if you google x79 mobo's. It seems that by taking that board to the limit (which is what one should do if spending that kind of doe) It seems that the board needs tweaking and a lot of nurturing to get it to run. Some complain that after a couple of days that config crashes. Some blame win7 for the problem. Others blame the install, some blame the memery used. Lack of yet another BIOS update etc. I do not want to have a PHD in Computers to use one. I want to build one as the last one I bought was from Dell and they burned me with a chincy getby model that cannot even be upgraded if I wanted to. So I will build it. Yet, I want to build something that is reliable and not so hot-rodded I need a PHD to keep it running.
    I was going to go with the 3930k and Asus x79 W.S because the W.S are supposed to be tested more before shipping. I also (after reading about the sensitive issues with the x79) Shift over the the Asrock extreme9 which needs to be tuned like a Ferrari from what I read to keep working....

    If I am dead wrong please advise...I am not sure I even need that computer, although all I do is video edit.
  5. Also after reveiwing it looks like this one is a bit more performance designed then the other two...Due to PCI expansions. Do you know if my IEEE firewire card I have in my dell needs one of those precious 16 pci slots. I was thinking with the doe I am saving on getting one of these boards and a four core cpu I could pop for a gtx 680 to run in tandem with my quadro 4000. Giving me 4gb of video and quad core of cpu all complimented with 32 gb of ram.....Watchya think on that config? I am still trying to understand the option of a 2600k cpu and a 3770k....

    I am going to run CS6 Master suite. Do a lot of Html5 graphics and work with 264 video encoded with MTS, until I can pop for a black magic cam (The Shiz for the indy movie maker)
    I also am a student so I can get Avid Media Composer for a song as well. Which I will get if Adobe leaves me with a short palette.

    I am really grateful for any wisdom shared with me. Thank you in advance!

    *Edit- Forgot to add the Mobo ASUS P8Z77-V - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] therboards
  6. First off, a GTX680 will not be able to run in tandum, or SLI, with a QUADRO4000 GPU. The total amount of VRAM does not double if you configure video cards in SLI.

    For example, if you SLI two GTX680's with 2GB memory each, you have 4GB memory in total, however, you only have 2GB of VRAM to work with for each card. Hopefully you can understand what I mean by this :lol: It can get quite confusing at first.

    Second, as long as you don't plan on overclocking, I highly doubt you would run into any issues with X79. The few issues that I know of with X79 is generally how jam packed the motherboard is (HEAPS of electrical traces around the CPU area). This ultimately leads to some motherboards with issues if you fill up all 8 DIMM slots and try to overclock your CPU. If you're going to fill up the 8 slots and leave your CPU at stock settings, or, just plan to give your CPU a mild, mild, OC, then I can't see you would have any issues.

    Now, if you're looking to use GPU's for acceleration, I would highly recommend taking a look at AMD's Radeon HD7xxx series of cards. Nvidia's current line of GPU's perform worse in OpenCL applications than their previous Fermi-based cards.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-650-ti-benchmark-gk106,3318-14.html

    However, since you did mention purchasing an Nvidia Quadro 4000 GPU, I think you will be fine in the GPU acceleration department. However, it should be noted you will not be able to run the GTX680 in SLI with the Q4000 (as previously stated) and the 680 will lack greatly in performance for any OpenCL applications (as previously stated).

    Now for your Firewire cards, you will have to look at the card yourself. I wouldn't be surprised if they were only PCI-E 1x, however, it's best to take a look at them yourself. If they require a PCI-E 16x slot, I would most likely look at some higher-end motherboards just so you have extra PCI-E lanes.

    For RAM and CPU, 32GB is certainly a great option for you if you end up going with Z77. It would leave you with ample memory to do all the video encoding work your heart desires. And with RAM dropping in price, I wouldn't be surprised to see 8GB DIMMs being affordable soon.

    The Intel Core i7 2600k and i7 3770k are nearly identical. There are a few differences, however, as you may have already noticed.

    1) 2600k is based on the Sandy Bridge architecture on a 32nm process. It also features the Intel HD3000 graphics.

    2) 3770k is based on the Ivy Bridge architecture on a 22nm process (Ivy Bridge = shrunk down Sandy Bridge). It's also around 5-7% faster clock-for-clock. It features the Intel HD4000 graphics (more on this later).

    The Intel HD4000 graphics will allow you to take advantage of LucidVirtuMVP. This feature will allow you to convert video files (with supported applications) much quicker than if you were to convert with your CPU alone. This may be very useful for you considering you will be doing a lot of video work (I think).

    All-in-all, both CPU's are great, however, keep in mind that Ivy Bridge is newer technology so if I were to build a rig today, I would personally purchase the i7 3770k.

    Phew, I just wrote a huge wall of text... :lol: If you are confused on anything or would like to know more information, please let me know and I'll be glad to be of assistance.
  7. mocchan said:
    First off, a GTX680 will not be able to run in tandum, or SLI, with a QUADRO4000 GPU. The total amount of VRAM does not double if you configure video cards in SLI.

    For example, if you SLI two GTX680's with 2GB memory each, you have 4GB memory in total, however, you only have 2GB of VRAM to work with for each card. Hopefully you can understand what I mean by this :lol: It can get quite confusing at first.

    Second, as long as you don't plan on overclocking, I highly doubt you would run into any issues with X79. The few issues that I know of with X79 is generally how jam packed the motherboard is (HEAPS of electrical traces around the CPU area). This ultimately leads to some motherboards with issues if you fill up all 8 DIMM slots and try to overclock your CPU. If you're going to fill up the 8 slots and leave your CPU at stock settings, or, just plan to give your CPU a mild, mild, OC, then I can't see you would have any issues.

    Now, if you're looking to use GPU's for acceleration, I would highly recommend taking a look at AMD's Radeon HD7xxx series of cards. Nvidia's current line of GPU's perform worse in OpenCL applications than their previous Fermi-based cards.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-650-ti-benchmark-gk106,3318-14.html

    However, since you did mention purchasing an Nvidia Quadro 4000 GPU, I think you will be fine in the GPU acceleration department. However, it should be noted you will not be able to run the GTX680 in SLI with the Q4000 (as previously stated) and the 680 will lack greatly in performance for any OpenCL applications (as previously stated).

    Now for your Firewire cards, you will have to look at the card yourself. I wouldn't be surprised if they were only PCI-E 1x, however, it's best to take a look at them yourself. If they require a PCI-E 16x slot, I would most likely look at some higher-end motherboards just so you have extra PCI-E lanes.

    For RAM and CPU, 32GB is certainly a great option for you if you end up going with Z77. It would leave you with ample memory to do all the video encoding work your heart desires. And with RAM dropping in price, I wouldn't be surprised to see 8GB DIMMs being affordable soon.

    The Intel Core i7 2600k and i7 3770k are nearly identical. There are a few differences, however, as you may have already noticed.

    1) 2600k is based on the Sandy Bridge architecture on a 32nm process. It also features the Intel HD3000 graphics.

    2) 3770k is based on the Ivy Bridge architecture on a 22nm process (Ivy Bridge = shrunk down Sandy Bridge). It's also around 5-7% faster clock-for-clock. It features the Intel HD4000 graphics (more on this later).

    The Intel HD4000 graphics will allow you to take advantage of LucidVirtuMVP. This feature will allow you to convert video files (with supported applications) much quicker than if you were to convert with your CPU alone. This may be very useful for you considering you will be doing a lot of video work (I think).

    All-in-all, both CPU's are great, however, keep in mind that Ivy Bridge is newer technology so if I were to build a rig today, I would personally purchase the i7 3770k.

    Phew, I just wrote a huge wall of text... :lol: If you are confused on anything or would like to know more information, please let me know and I'll be glad to be of assistance.


    Thank you for that detailed message. Your message may seem long to you, I ate it up. I have been reading pages and pages of information on all the above. I think as you stated that I won't need anything more then the quad 4000 card and that 3770 to do most of my work. I think for the extra 500 bucks (todays price) If I wait and find that a 3770 and a 2gb vram card is not getting me there I can 'Pop' for an x79 board, hex core and use a tesla card in tandem.
    Although I was under the impression having two cards split the threading? I am sure you know more then I on that. I was only thinking about a second card to goof off on my downtime to play some shooter video games... LOL
    I went with quadro because Avid and Adobe preach that is an accepted card for support. Avid over Adobe. Hence the Nvidia card as Adobe is a bit more lenient with that.

    I think I understand that a card will only render on one card, however I think if I want to preview my work before, or while waiting to render I will then be using the other 2gb of ram to do so?? Please correct if I am mistaken. Thanks again for the offer on help. I may P.M you later
    peace
    Netcommercial
  8. LOL yes, I had figured you would do some gaming on your down time with your rig. With all this shiny hardware, who could resist? ;)

    Anyway, about the VRAM available to each card. What I meant in my previous post by "You have 2GB of VRAM to work with on each card" is this - For an SLI configuration, each GPU is basically a 'mirror image' per se of each card in SLI. Whatever is being rendered on GPU 1 is also being rendered on GPU 2; thus leaving you with only 2GB of frame buffer in total.

    This does not mean GPU 1 will be rendering items and using up the VRAM while GPU 2 will have all 2GB available. GPU 1 & 2 will both consume the same amount of VRAM at all times (for supported applications). Hopefully this cleared up a little of the misunderstanding.

    You're very welcome and I will be waiting for your PM :)

    -Mocchan
  9. mocchan said:
    LOL yes, I had figured you would do some gaming on your down time with your rig. With all this shiny hardware, who could resist? ;)

    Anyway, about the VRAM available to each card. What I meant in my previous post by "You have 2GB of VRAM to work with on each card" is this - For an SLI configuration, each GPU is basically a 'mirror image' per se of each card in SLI. Whatever is being rendered on GPU 1 is also being rendered on GPU 2; thus leaving you with only 2GB of frame buffer in total.

    This does not mean GPU 1 will be rendering items and using up the VRAM while GPU 2 will have all 2GB available. GPU 1 & 2 will both consume the same amount of VRAM at all times (for supported applications). Hopefully this cleared up a little of the misunderstanding.

    You're very welcome and I will be waiting for your PM :)

    -Mocchan



    So why do people run a tandem card? Why not just buy a bigger ram card? IE: Instead of 'popping' for two cards at 700 a piece let's say... Why not buy a 1200 dollar card with 4gb? Is the dual card faster at processing? One would think 2gb is 2gb no matter if it is split? And so on...

    And yes you better believe I am looking forward to getting back on the Battlefield with a decent computer. After reading about Mobo's and ram, etc. Now I know how I can be sniped from across the map. Personally in my opinion, I am not sure I would want all that advantage. It's like cheating and being excited when you win..No?
    Ahh, anyways. I am about ready to buy that config above that you mentioned with the z77 board and the 3770k CPU. I think that will hum along fine for editing and goofin-off' with games on the side. Or down time.
    I appreciate your input and am grateful for forums like these. Thank you. If you have any suggestions for a Mobo and Cpu after further thought please just PM me or comment over here so others on the quest for a rig can access it.
    Peace,
    Netcommercial
  10. VRAM on a GPU has a different purpose than RAM for your system. For your system, RAM serves as a giant cache for your HDD. However, for your GPU, it stores more information for your GPU to render.

    The reason why most people opt to get (for the sake of this example, I'll use a GTX680) a 2GB GTX680 is because the amount of VRAM on that particular card is more than enough for any games up to 2560x1600 resolution. 4GB of VRAM will benefit performance, however, considering the cost of the 4GB version of the card is $100 more than a 2GB card for only a 5-8% performance increase, it's not very cost effective.

    And yes, you are correct. Two 2GB cards working in SLI/CrossfireX would be faster than ONE 4GB card. They will provide much more horsepower for the cost instead of purchasing one 4GB card.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6096/evga-geforce-gtx-680-classified-review/6

    The card listed as "EVGA GTX680C is the 4GB version of the card. The other GTX680/670 listed in this list is 2GB. As you can clearly see, the performance difference between 4GB and 2GB isn't as big as one would think. The bigger VRAM would help if you were to make a MASSIVE Nvidia Surround configuration (Three 2560x1600 Monitors for example) however, for your run-of-the-mill 2560x1600/1920x1080 gaming, it's not a very big benefit for the amount of money you're spending.

    Of course, this will be a very different story if you're going to be working on Compute/acceleration applications, however, you have stated you already have a Quadro card so this is not a very big concern to me at the moment.
  11. As far as I know, no programs that have GPU acceleration can take advantage of SLI.
  12. mocchan said:
    VRAM on a GPU has a different purpose than RAM for your system. For your system, RAM serves as a giant cache for your HDD. However, for your GPU, it stores more information for your GPU to render.

    The reason why most people opt to get (for the sake of this example, I'll use a GTX680) a 2GB GTX680 is because the amount of VRAM on that particular card is more than enough for any games up to 2560x1600 resolution. 4GB of VRAM will benefit performance, however, considering the cost of the 4GB version of the card is $100 more than a 2GB card for only a 5-8% performance increase, it's not very cost effective.

    And yes, you are correct. Two 2GB cards working in SLI/CrossfireX would be faster than ONE 4GB card. They will provide much more horsepower for the cost instead of purchasing one 4GB card.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6096/evga-geforce-gtx-680-classified-review/6

    The card listed as "EVGA GTX680C is the 4GB version of the card. The other GTX680/670 listed in this list is 2GB. As you can clearly see, the performance difference between 4GB and 2GB isn't as big as one would think. The bigger VRAM would help if you were to make a MASSIVE Nvidia Surround configuration (Three 2560x1600 Monitors for example) however, for your run-of-the-mill 2560x1600/1920x1080 gaming, it's not a very big benefit for the amount of money you're spending.

    Of course, this will be a very different story if you're going to be working on Compute/acceleration applications, however, you have stated you already have a Quadro card so this is not a very big concern to me at the moment.


    Thanks for that. I appreciate it. I have learned a lot of things on this forum and also do read a lot of Anandtech forum, although I am not a member over there. So according to your information. I do not think Crossfire will even be used for my application, or most folks applications, for that matter. From what I am understanding here, it is really for multi monitors at a high res. Or accessing the Crossfire, using a Tesla card to speed up the rendering or processing of data. Thanks. Direct me if I am mistaken.
    Regards,
    Netcommercial
  13. My apologies, I may have confused you with the terms CrossfireX and SLI with my previous post. CrossfireX is a technology strictly for AMD GPU's while SLI is strictly for Nvidia GPU's. They are both the same thing in which they take multiple cards to work together for beefier performance, however.

    But getting back on topic, yes, you are correct.
  14. Best answer selected by netcommercial.
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