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Ivy Bridge vs. Sandy Bridge thermals?

Last response: in CPUs
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October 18, 2012 5:46:49 PM

Hello all.

I have been noticing a lot of people on the forum stating that the Ivy Bridge processors have heat issues.

I would figure that with the die shrink from 32nm to 22nm than the thermals would be better with an Ivy Bridge.

The Ivy Bridge i7 3770 does consume less power for the same clock speed as the Sandy Bridge i7 2600 (77 vs. 95 watts).

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October 18, 2012 6:20:40 PM

but it also has less surface area to get rid of the heat.

they are fine just have a really low thermal mass and so rapidly change temp, especially as the heat spreader is poorly connected from a thermal standpoint.
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October 18, 2012 7:43:38 PM

This isn't a heat issue, but a cooling issue. The issue is how well that heat can be dissipated and keep the cpu cool. Smaller die size means less surface area used to draw heat away from the cpu. They are just harder to cool.

Larger heat sinks, with more airflow, and liquid cooling have become more of a necessity with Ivy Bridge cpu's - especially when overclocking.
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October 18, 2012 7:51:36 PM

I have an i7 3770 with Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO cooler and the CPU under normal use stays at ~90F.
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October 18, 2012 8:08:28 PM

ss202sl said:
This isn't a heat issue, but a cooling issue. The issue is how well that heat can be dissipated and keep the cpu cool. Smaller die size means less surface area used to draw heat away from the cpu. They are just harder to cool.

Larger heat sinks, with more airflow, and liquid cooling have become more of a necessity with Ivy Bridge cpu's - especially when overclocking.


the limiting factor is the link between the chip and the heat spreader, any changes made beyond that point in the thermal chain will be of minimal effectiveness. Yes keeping the heat spreader side of the junction helps, but no where near as much as it would if that junction was a better thermal conductor.
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