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A really stupid noobish question

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October 18, 2012 7:30:34 PM


Hi. I am going to be building my first computer. Ultimately I would like it to be an Ivy Bridge system, but I don't know if I want to drop that much cash to start with my first build. I was browsing and saw that I could perhaps use an AMD chip and motherboard and do this for a bit cheaper. My question would be that, and I know its stupid, but would I be able to once I had the money, be able to use the rest of my components with Intel and Ivy Bridge without any problems? For instance my hard drive, SSD and that sort of thing. Will I just be able to plug in the new chip and motherboard and away we go, or is it complicated?

I would start with Ivy, but I am afraid if I screw something up and ruin my components, I would have been a lot more expensive. Trust me, I always find interesting and unique ways of screwing things up. I am going to be like the Lucille Ball of computer building.

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October 18, 2012 7:42:06 PM

Everything will be cross-compatable, Hard drives, CD drives, and GPU's will work on any current-standard motherboard (AMD or INTEL) without issue.

As long as you are careful, you shouldn't have to worry about messing anything up. It wouldn't make much sense to buy an AMD set, then switch over to an Intel set. You should pick one or the other and stick with it.
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October 18, 2012 7:42:47 PM

With the possible exception of RAM, all of your parts(except Motherboard and CPU) would be compatible from an AMD build to an INTEL build. That being said, you would probably have to do a clean install of Windows because the drivers installed for an AMD build would cause problems for an INTEL based system.
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October 18, 2012 7:45:04 PM

In my opinion the best thing to do (to make sure you don't spend more money then needed) Is tell us exactly what you want the computer to do. Assuming gaming... If so then exactly what games you want to play. Also give us a price range of what you want to spend now. you would be surprised at what some of the people on here can come up with.
October 18, 2012 7:47:49 PM

azathoth said:
Everything will be cross-compatable, Hard drives, CD drives, and GPU's will work on any current-standard motherboard (AMD or INTEL) without issue.

As long as you are careful, you shouldn't have to worry about messing anything up. It wouldn't make much sense to buy an AMD set, then switch over to an Intel set. You should pick one or the other and stick with it.



In your opinon. Which do you think would be better? I am looking to game with the rig (EVE, WOW, Skyrim, and perhaps a few others) was not looking to really overclock. I was also going to write some screenplays, surf the web and was looking to get into editing video as well as virtual dj-ing music. Is AMD as good for this sort of stuff or should I just say F-it and go Ivy Bridge to start?
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October 18, 2012 7:55:13 PM

Zero8 said:
In your opinon. Which do you think would be better? I am looking to game with the rig (EVE, WOW, Skyrim, and perhaps a few others) was not looking to really overclock. I was also going to write some screenplays, surf the web and was looking to get into editing video as well as virtual dj-ing music. Is AMD as good for this sort of stuff or should I just say F-it and go Ivy Bridge to start?


Amd isn't bad. And it's cheaper. But Intel right now is the better proc. for video editing you would benefit the most from an i7. But it would all really come down to what your overall budget is. the difference between $500 and $1000 to $1500 can drastically change the kind of build you'll be making.

If the funds are available i would go with a ivy bridge i7. Since your not looking to overclock you can save a little bit of money by not getting a K version proc. Give us a rough estimate of what you can spend now. And people will put together builds for you ;) .

*if it were me and I had my choice i'd save up until i could afford intel. But thats just my preference.
October 18, 2012 7:59:10 PM

unoriginal1 said:
In my opinion the best thing to do (to make sure you don't spend more money then needed) Is tell us exactly what you want the computer to do. Assuming gaming... If so then exactly what games you want to play. Also give us a price range of what you want to spend now. you would be surprised at what some of the people on here can come up with.



Hey. Thanks for helping. The games I was looking to play with this would be EVE Online, World of Warcfaft possibly, Skyrim, and I guess would like to have the option to play whatever is out there. One thing I would like to do is play this game I had back in the day that I never got to finish. Its old, Privateer 2 The Darkening.
Also wanted to write screenplays, edit video, and wanted to get into mixing music.

If I can I would like to try and go somewhere between $800-1000. I have to buy a monitor, an OS, and keyboard mice that sort of stuff.

October 18, 2012 8:03:05 PM

unoriginal1 said:
Amd isn't bad. And it's cheaper. But Intel right now is the better proc. for video editing you would benefit the most from an i7. But it would all really come down to what your overall budget is. the difference between $500 and $1000 to $1500 can drastically change the kind of build you'll be making.

If the funds are available i would go with a ivy bridge i7. Since your not looking to overclock you can save a little bit of money by not getting a K version proc. Give us a rough estimate of what you can spend now. And people will put together builds for you ;) .

*if it were me and I had my choice i'd save up until i could afford intel. But thats just my preference.



I know nothing about overclocking. Does it make that much of a difference in terms of what your are doing when playing video games, and is it easy or difficult to do with someone who has limited experience such as myself? Thanks and I look forward to what you are going to come up with
October 18, 2012 8:11:36 PM

Oh and one other thing. Is it possible to operate a machine like this using Linux? Would that be wise for someone to do who does not have a lot of experience? I have never used it , but read an article about it and it seems like a good OS. One that has a lot less crap than Windows.
October 18, 2012 8:32:30 PM

The only good reason to NOT use Linux is if you need some specific Windows applications. Linux has comparable (often better) apps available. Some Windows apps and games can be used on Linux by installing the Windows non-emulator called WINE.
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October 18, 2012 8:34:47 PM

Linux does not have as wide a support for games as Windows.

To be honest, Windows Vista/7 is probably the most bloated OS around (Though, I've only used 7. I hate it, but I use it for DirectX11), whereas XP, although dated, is many times better. Sure, it initially doesn't look as snazzy and doesn't support DirectX10/11, but heck, I can play all my old games just fine on it, and all the new games also play fine.

If you want less crap, and don't care too much about windows 7 (Note, there is a patch for WoW on windows 7 that gives a major FPS boost by using DirectX11 instead of 9), I'd strongly recommend XP.

Also, seeing as how the opinions given above are sound, the AMD Phenom II x4 965 BE (Retails for £70-80 in the UK) is only 25% slower (On average) than the i5 2500K (Retails for £165). The i3 2100 trades blows with it in games, but shows it's weakness of being a dual core in multithreaded applications, and that is where the 965 shines.

I game on Skyrim just fine with my 965. I'd like to have a better GPU (Got a 6670 ddr3, does 1152X868 (Or whatever that resolution between 1280X1024 and 1024X768 is) just fine @ a steady 40FPS all the time, with 4xAF and 0xAA.), but the CPU is great.

a b à CPUs
October 18, 2012 8:56:52 PM

Zero8 said:
I know nothing about overclocking. Does it make that much of a difference in terms of what your are doing when playing video games, and is it easy or difficult to do with someone who has limited experience such as myself? Thanks and I look forward to what you are going to come up with


OC'ng now a days is pretty simple. There is a lot of information available and it's much much easier then it used to be. I'm confident that if it's something you would like to do you would be able to learn. You won't run into issues playing the games you listed on stock speeds but where overclocking does come in handy is 2-3 years down the road when they have 2-3 better faster processors out and newer games requiring faster better equipment. Then overclocking plays huge in being able to boost your performance and be on par with the current technology.

A LOT of people overclock these days simply because they are enthusiasts and like to see what they can build / do. Not because they actually need it.

So i'd say.. If your even slightly interested. Go for it. Get a K proc. You don't have to overclock right away. When your ready i would start researching and make another post on here.

Did you post a budget? Unless i missed it i still haven't seen one ;) . Hard to come up with any kind of build with out an estimated price to spend.
October 18, 2012 9:12:08 PM

unoriginal1 said:
OC'ng now a days is pretty simple. There is a lot of information available and it's much much easier then it used to be. I'm confident that if it's something you would like to do you would be able to learn. You won't run into issues playing the games you listed on stock speeds but where overclocking does come in handy is 2-3 years down the road when they have 2-3 better faster processors out and newer games requiring faster better equipment. Then overclocking plays huge in being able to boost your performance and be on par with the current technology.

A LOT of people overclock these days simply because they are enthusiasts and like to see what they can build / do. Not because they actually need it.

So i'd say.. If your even slightly interested. Go for it. Get a K proc. You don't have to overclock right away. When your ready i would start researching and make another post on here.

Did you post a budget? Unless i missed it i still haven't seen one ;) . Hard to come up with any kind of build with out an estimated price to spend.


If I can I would like to try and go somewhere between $800-1000. I have to buy a monitor, an OS, and keyboard mice that sort of stuff.


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October 18, 2012 9:17:06 PM

Zero8 said:
If I can I would like to try and go somewhere between $800-1000. I have to buy a monitor, an OS, and keyboard mice that sort of stuff.


K start a new thread system/new builds title it something like new gaming build advice needed. And fill out this information. You can copy / paste the info and then fill in the blanks. For do you want to overclock just answer with "in the future" that way when they suggest builds they will include everything you need for it.


link for info:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/353572-31-build-upgra...
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