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total novice question

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July 27, 2005 6:08:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello there

Just found this group - hope you can help.

I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
about using it.

I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)

I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
focussed picture??!!

Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.

Looking forward to your advice!

Many thanks
Jim

More about : total novice question

Anonymous
July 27, 2005 6:56:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Before the camera can take a picture, the camera has to calculate a
couple of things, the correct exposure value and set focus on the
selected object in the viewfinder.

On Point and Shoot cameras this takes a certain amount of time, this is
called the Shutter lag time and varies from camera to camera. Could be
anything up to a second or more.

If you have a Sports mode on your camera you should try that as the
nature of sports photography is that the subject is moving very
quickly, hence the camera needs to react quicker then usual when taking
a picture.

If you find that the shutter lag time really does prevent you from
taking the pictures you want, then all I can suggest is looking for a
camera with a lower shutter lag time (a prosumer level Point & Shoot)
or maybe consider a Digital SLR camera which don't suffer from this
problem.
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 7:21:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Forgot to add, when you press the shutter button halfway, that's when
the camera performs the exposure calculation and focusing. It won't
let you take a picture until those calculations are done.

The sports mode is usually indicated by a picture of someone running
and from looking on the Kodak site, I think it'll be located on the
dial positioned on the top right hand side of your camera (as you look
at the back of the camera).

Try the sports mode first though, that should enable you to do what you
want.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 4:25:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Aside from what the other posters have said, I guess it should be noted that
it's almost impossible to get away from this "problem." The two-stage
shutter button is normal on all digital cameras, and you just learn to work
around it. The question is how long does it take your camera to make those
initial adjustments before you can take a photo?

As was said, even DSLR cameras have to focus, but it's usually very fast,
and if you prefocus the shot the shutter lag is nonexistent. The other
problem is how long does it take the camera to warm up before it can take a
photo when you first turn it on. Most DSLR's are ready immediately, while
some point and shoot cameras can take awhile.

While some cameras are definitely faster, I think you will be fine once you
learn to adjust to the two-stage shutter button on all digital cameras. It
bugs everybody at first.


"Jim" <jim@tharpa.com> wrote in message
news:1122455300.987322.173410@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hello there
>
> Just found this group - hope you can help.
>
> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!
>
> Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
> the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.
>
> Looking forward to your advice!
>
> Many thanks
> Jim
>
July 27, 2005 5:02:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The autofocus has to adjust first and the shutter will open only thereafter,
when you press the button all the way down. This can take anything from
0.3secs to one second or even more.
If you preset the button halfways, the camera will focus in advance and when
you find the exact right moment you can fully press the button and the time
from that can be from less than a tenth for the fastest cameras, to a couple
of tenths of a second. Use whatever method is best suited for the moment. I
myself feel that I get better control of whats on that pic if I have the
shortest possible delay between firing and the moment the camera catches the
pic.
It's easy to compare it for yourseft, take a few pics using both methods and
check the results.
/per
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:16:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim" <jim@tharpa.com> wrote in message
news:1122455300.987322.173410@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hello there
>
> Just found this group - hope you can help.
>
> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!
>
> Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
> the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.
>
> Looking forward to your advice!
>
> Many thanks
> Jim
>

You should set the camera to the 'psychic focus' preset mode. This allows
the camera to know automagically exactly what it should focus on even before
you have switched it on. Alternatively use a camera phone. Then you'll
understand why focussing is a good idea.

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 3:04:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> If you find that the shutter lag time really does prevent you from
> taking the pictures you want, then all I can suggest is looking for a
> camera with a lower shutter lag time (a prosumer level Point & Shoot)
> or maybe consider a Digital SLR camera which don't suffer from this
> problem.

I'm afraid that D-SLRs still have to focus as well, which still takes time
:( 
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 3:04:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Cockpit Colin wrote:

>> If you find that the shutter lag time really does prevent you from
>> taking the pictures you want, then all I can suggest is looking for
>> a camera with a lower shutter lag time (a prosumer level Point &
>> Shoot) or maybe consider a Digital SLR camera which don't suffer
>> from this problem.
>
> I'm afraid that D-SLRs still have to focus as well, which still
> takes time
> :( 
You can use manual focus and prefocus on a point that the subject will
have to pass - works for the right subject.
--
Neil
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 11:43:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Cockpit Colin wrote:
>>If you find that the shutter lag time really does prevent you from
>>taking the pictures you want, then all I can suggest is looking for a
>>camera with a lower shutter lag time (a prosumer level Point & Shoot)
>>or maybe consider a Digital SLR camera which don't suffer from this
>>problem.
>
>
> I'm afraid that D-SLRs still have to focus as well, which still takes time
> :( 
>
>
>
True, but the lag time is substantially less then a Point & Shoot camera.

I've managed to successfully capture a number of action shots with my
Canon 350D that my other camera, a Sony DSC-P72 would have missed by the
time it's worked out focus, exposure values etc.

I'm not saying a DSLR is the answer, just that in my experience moving
to a DSLR substantially improved my chances of getting the shot. Other
people will have different experiences depending on their model of
camera. Some have better response times, some are worse, that's all.
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 4:06:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim wrote:

> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!

Hi Jim,

I think part of the problem is that you're used to some of the lower-end
film cameras, where indeed you could just click the shutter and get a
picture. The reason for this is that the lower end cameras have fixed
exposure levels, fixed apertures, and fixed lenses with their focus
point set to infinity, thereby always giving you a photo is is
more-or-less focused, and has a good chance of being "good enough" as
far as exposure goes. In reality, most photos taken by such cameras are
almost always just a tad bit fuzzy, but for the typical 3x5 or 4x6
print, the image is reduced enough in size that the average person
doesn't notice it.

While lenses set to infinity can also be found on the cheaper digital
cameras and camera phones, this usually won't fly on a digital camera
with a decent resolution (say 3megapixels and higher). You'll definitly
notice that any pics will be out of focus. As a result, most film
cameras that actually are worth something, as well as most
similarly-worthy digital cameras will require you to take a second or
two to computer focus and exposure settings.

Ther ARE some digital cameras that can be configured to constantly stay
in focus by continually adjusting and analyzing what they're seeing.
The Nikon Coolpix 7900 has such a setting, and I suppose if you really
want to be able to shoot instantly all fo the time, you might want to
see if your Kodak has a similar mode. The downside to this setting is
that it doesn't work so well in low light, and consumes a LOT of battery
power, and you'll find that your camera won't last nearly as long
between charges or battery changes. I imagine there might also be some
wear issues of having the focus mechanism constatly moving to keep the
image sharp.


--
E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
July 31, 2005 8:08:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim wrote:
> Hello there
>
> Just found this group - hope you can help.
>
> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!

You can. But there are some times the trick will help.
>
> Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
> the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.
>
> Looking forward to your advice!
>
> Many thanks
> Jim
>
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 10:26:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim" <jim@tharpa.com> writes:
> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!
>
> Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
> the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.

Try setting the camera in "Landscape" mode (the mountains on the main
mode dial). This will turn off the autofocus, stop down for a large
depth of field, and set focus to infinity.

You might think that this will give you out-of-focus images if you try
tp focus something nearer than infinity - but unless you intend to
print large sizes - it will probably not be noticable at "ordinary"
shooting distances (10 ft and more).

Cheap P&S cameras without autofocus work this way. Using the
"Landscape" mode turns your Kodak into a such a cheap P&S.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 10:29:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim" <jim@tharpa.com> writes:
> I have just bought a Kodak C340 digital camera and have a question
> about using it.
>
> I just want to be able to point and shoot, but the manual tells me to
> press the shutter button halfway and wait for the framing marks to turn
> green for it to focus, then fully depress the button to take the
> picture. (NB - I am not in any of the pre-set picture-taking modes e.g
> scene, portrait etc., just the standard Auto mode)
>
> I want to just be able to point the camera and fully press the button
> straightaway, without having to wait (and possibly miss capturing "the
> moment"!). The camera seems to allow me to do this, even though it is
> not mentioned in the manual that you can do so, but will the picture
> then be out of focus? Surely I can just point and shoot and get a
> focussed picture??!!
>
> Please can anyone help me? I guess the same question applies also to
> the pre-set picture-taking modes but I haven't tried those yet.

Try setting the camera in "Landscape" mode (mountains icon on the main
mode dial). This will turn off the autofocus, stop down for a large
depth of field, and set focus to infinity.

You might think that this will give you out-of-focus images if you try
to photograph something nearer than infinity - but it will probably
not be noticable at "ordinary" shooting distances (10 ft and more),
unless you intend to print at large sizes.

Cheap P&S cameras without autofocus work this way. Using the
"Landscape" mode turns your Kodak into a such a cheap P&S.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
!