Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Case for cooling and PSU

Last response: in Components
Share
October 19, 2012 1:55:10 PM

I am getting a NVIDIA GTX 660ti for my computer so I need a good case for cooling
I am installing a prebuilt watercooler into my computer and I have a core i3 3.07ghz processor with 4gb ram (going to upgrade to 16gb) So how many watts do I need for this

-I dont live in the U.S so if your providing links please check whether it has international shipping :) 

More about : case cooling psu

a b ) Power supply
October 19, 2012 2:07:45 PM

what country are you in. It's easier for us to provide local links than find a retailer with international shipping.
m
0
l
October 19, 2012 2:29:06 PM

abekl said:
what country are you in. It's easier for us to provide local links than find a retailer with international shipping.

I'm from Maldives (i dont think that there will be any cases for sale here since it is a really small country :/ )

I am using via address as a package forwarder so if there is any cheap cases let me know
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 137 ) Power supply
October 19, 2012 3:32:10 PM

xelyon said:
I am getting a NVIDIA GTX 660ti for my computer so I need a good case for cooling
I am installing a prebuilt watercooler into my computer and I have a core i3 3.07ghz processor with 4gb ram (going to upgrade to 16gb) So how many watts do I need for this

-I dont live in the U.S so if your providing links please check whether it has international shipping :) 


The GTX660ti is not a particularly hot or power hungry card.
It needs a 450w psu with two pcie 6 pin connectors.
Buy only a quality brand like Seasonic, Antec, PC P&c, Corsair, XFX.
Here is a tiered by quality list to check:
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

As to your other parts.

A pre built water cooler is an unfortunate choice for several reasons:
1. A i3 cpu does not need nor benefit from high end cooling.
2. all-in-one kits are expensive. A $30 tower type cooler with a 120mm fan will do the job.
3. water cooling will be noisy and less reliable.
4. When installed as per instructions, it will draw in cool air into the radiator to cool the cpu which does not need it.
The hot air is dumped inside the case which heats up the motherboard and graphics card.
My suggestion is to sell it if you have already bought it. The stock intel cooler will do the job but gets noisy under load.

If your use is for gaming, then a 2 x 4gb kit is all you need. No game uses more than 2-3gb by itself.

If you will be using 64 bit enabled apps, then 16gb(2 x 8gb) is good.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards can be very sensitive to this.
That is why ram vendors will not support ram that is not bought in one kit.
Although, I think the problem has lessened with the newer Intel chipsets. Still,
it is safer to get what you need in one kit.

As to the case, if you have at least two 120mm intake fans, or the equivalent in output, then you will have plenty of cooling.
For inexpensive cases that meet that criteria, look at the Antec 100/200/300 series.
m
0
l
October 19, 2012 5:52:28 PM

geofelt said:
The GTX660ti is not a particularly hot or power hungry card.
It needs a 450w psu with two pcie 6 pin connectors.
Buy only a quality brand like Seasonic, Antec, PC P&c, Corsair, XFX.
Here is a tiered by quality list to check:
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

As to your other parts.

A pre built water cooler is an unfortunate choice for several reasons:
1. A i3 cpu does not need nor benefit from high end cooling.
2. all-in-one kits are expensive. A $30 tower type cooler with a 120mm fan will do the job.
3. water cooling will be noisy and less reliable.
4. When installed as per instructions, it will draw in cool air into the radiator to cool the cpu which does not need it.
The hot air is dumped inside the case which heats up the motherboard and graphics card.
My suggestion is to sell it if you have already bought it. The stock intel cooler will do the job but gets noisy under load.

If your use is for gaming, then a 2 x 4gb kit is all you need. No game uses more than 2-3gb by itself.

If you will be using 64 bit enabled apps, then 16gb(2 x 8gb) is good.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards can be very sensitive to this.
That is why ram vendors will not support ram that is not bought in one kit.
Although, I think the problem has lessened with the newer Intel chipsets. Still,
it is safer to get what you need in one kit.

As to the case, if you have at least two 120mm intake fans, or the equivalent in output, then you will have plenty of cooling.
For inexpensive cases that meet that criteria, look at the Antec 100/200/300 series.

are you sure the 660ti wont overheat? I'll be running games at max (Crysis 2/Assassins creed 3/skyrim with enb) so it will generate some stress on the card especially when playing crysis thats the reason why I am thinking of watercooling...btw i have decided to buy a Haf 922 and I'll be using 8gb for gaming then


m
0
l

Best solution

a c 137 ) Power supply
October 19, 2012 6:18:17 PM

xelyon said:
are you sure the 660ti wont overheat? I'll be running games at max (Crysis 2/Assassins creed 3/skyrim with enb) so it will generate some stress on the card especially when playing crysis thats the reason why I am thinking of watercooling...btw i have decided to buy a Haf 922 and I'll be using 8gb for gaming then


First of all, the 28nm cards run cooler(GTX6xx, amd7xxx)

next, graphics cards can run hot, but they are built to tolerate high heat.
If they get too hot, like over 100c, then they will downclock to protect themselves.

Many GTX660ti cards come with fancy doupbe and triple fan coolers at an extra price. They do a good job of cooling in an open testbed, but not necessarily that good in a case. The hot gpu air gets passed through the cpu cooler. I find that a stock cooler with a direct exhaust out the rear is just as good, and often better.
I would be happier with a cooler like this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Check the user feedback on this and similar cards for opinions on cooling effectiveness.
Share
October 19, 2012 7:06:02 PM

geofelt said:
First of all, the 28nm cards run cooler(GTX6xx, amd7xxx)

next, graphics cards can run hot, but they are built to tolerate high heat.
If they get too hot, like over 100c, then they will downclock to protect themselves.

Many GTX660ti cards come with fancy doupbe and triple fan coolers at an extra price. They do a good job of cooling in an open testbed, but not necessarily that good in a case. The hot gpu air gets passed through the cpu cooler. I find that a stock cooler with a direct exhaust out the rear is just as good, and often better.
I would be happier with a cooler like this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Check the user feedback on this and similar cards for opinions on cooling effectiveness.

Ok thanks for the advice man :) 
m
0
l
October 19, 2012 7:06:06 PM

Best answer selected by xelyon.
m
0
l
!