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Best LGA775 processor for video editing

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October 20, 2012 4:16:40 PM

Hello,
I currently have the Intel Q9300 processor in my Asus P5Q Premium motherboard. I do a great deal of video editing (mostly for churches and charitable organizations), and the processing time is prohibitive (15 hours for a 1 hour video!).

My graphics card is the new GeForce GTX 660 Ti, so I have lots of GPU's (which, unfortunately, have no bearing on processing :o (

Thanks
a c 283 à CPUs
October 20, 2012 4:51:11 PM

You're close to the top of the LGA 775 food chain already, with the Q9300.

After the Q9300, the only CPU's that would make much sense to upgrade to would be prohibitively expensive.

You can try to find a Q9650, but that's only 500Mhz faster (although, it does have 6MB more cache). After that, it's the QX CPU's that you have to pay more than they're worth to buy.

It would make more sense to just build a whole new system because the editing performance gained from any CPU upgrade you make will only be minimal, while the money spent will be close to as much as much or more as a brand new current CPU will cost. Just not worth it, really.

You can try overclocking the Q9300, though. The only money spent that way is on an aftermarket heatsink.

Also, which editing program do you use? Most have GPU accelerated encoding, which of course, takes the CPU out of the equation, for the most part.
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a b à CPUs
October 20, 2012 5:59:45 PM

Upgrading on a LGA 775 socket is pretty much pointless.
The best thing you can do right now is buy a good CPU cooler and overclock your CPU.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/695/12/
According to this article you should be able to overclock it to 3.5GHZ which will make it a lot faster.

This cooler is really really good and it's price is very low.
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=64385&vpn=RR-212E-20PK...


OR if you want a VERY significant performance improvement wait until the AMD FX-8320 comes out and buy it.It will double your PC's performance.
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a b à CPUs
October 20, 2012 6:16:03 PM

Kamen_BG said:
Upgrading on a LGA 775 socket is pretty much pointless.
The best thing you can do right now is buy a good CPU cooler and overclock your CPU.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/695/12/
According to this article you should be able to overclock it to 3.5GHZ which will make it a lot faster.

This cooler is really really good and it's price is very low.
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=64385&vpn=RR-212E-20PK...


OR if you want a VERY significant performance improvement wait until the AMD FX-8320 comes out and buy it.It will double your PC's performance.


This is your best bet. I agree with this.
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October 20, 2012 6:41:03 PM

Quote:
Also, which editing program do you use? Most have GPU accelerated encoding, which of course, takes the CPU out of the equation, for the most part.
[/quotemsg]

First of all - thank you for your input and comments. I'll give overclocking a try (something I've never done before so I guess I'd better do some quick research :o )

As for the editing software: I'm currently using Premiere Pro CS5.5 - - and, yes, it does have GPU acceleration, however, according to Adobe (and my observations confirm), this has no bearing on encoding/rendering. It's only good for display and effects purposes only (and, I must say, the GTX 660 Ti does a great job on that).

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October 20, 2012 6:55:52 PM

Kamen_BG said:
Upgrading on a LGA 775 socket is pretty much pointless.
The best thing you can do right now is buy a good CPU cooler and overclock your CPU.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/695/12/
According to this article you should be able to overclock it to 3.5GHZ which will make it a lot faster.

This cooler is really really good and it's price is very low.
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=64385&vpn=RR-212E-20PK...


OR if you want a VERY significant performance improvement wait until the AMD FX-8320 comes out and buy it.It will double your PC's performance.



Thank you for the links - - the article was a very interesting read.

I plan to go the overclocking route for now and see how much improvement I can find.
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a b à CPUs
October 20, 2012 6:59:54 PM

Just make sure you've got a good cooler.You don't want to risk your CPU overheating.
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a c 283 à CPUs
October 20, 2012 7:01:21 PM

Premiere Pro CS5.5 does do GPU accelerated encoding/rendering too, BUT, the 660 Ti isn't on their proprietary "Certified" list. http://www.shawnlam.ca/2011/adobe-cs5-5-max-render-qual...

I know from my own experience that Sony Vegas works and encodes with my 560, though.

I suppose overclocking or a new build are your only two viable options if you want to stay with Premiere.

Honestly, overclocking won't really help much (it's basically doing what you would be doing if you got a faster Core 2 Quad, though, and that's really not worth it either).

My honest recommendation is to look into getting an AMD FX-8150, or 8350, when it's released next week. That will be much more beneficial than anything you can do with your current build.

Of course, that requires a new motherboard and RAM, as well, but if time really is that much of a concern, it'll pay for itself in no time.
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October 27, 2012 12:11:06 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Premiere Pro CS5.5 does do GPU accelerated encoding/rendering too, BUT, the 660 Ti isn't on their proprietary "Certified" list. http://www.shawnlam.ca/2011/adobe-cs5-5-max-render-qual...


But it can be "opened" (see http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/PremiereCS5.... ) I followed the directions in this article and my new GTX 660 Ti is now fully functional as a GPU accelerator in Premiere.


DJDeCiBeL said:
My honest recommendation is to look into getting an AMD FX-8150, or 8350, when it's released next week. That will be much more beneficial than anything you can do with your current build.

Of course, that requires a new motherboard and RAM, as well, but if time really is that much of a concern, it'll pay for itself in no time.


Cost is a major factor, which means I guess I'll either have to live with it - - or see what overclocking will do.

Thanks for your thoughts. Much appreciated.
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a c 138 à CPUs
October 27, 2012 12:38:56 AM

the gpu is fast and the cpu not fast .. it's will same with the gts450/ gt250 :D 
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a c 99 à CPUs
October 27, 2012 1:39:19 AM

FatherH said:
Hello,
I currently have the Intel Q9300 processor in my Asus P5Q Premium motherboard. I do a great deal of video editing (mostly for churches and charitable organizations), and the processing time is prohibitive (15 hours for a 1 hour video!).

My graphics card is the new GeForce GTX 660 Ti, so I have lots of GPU's (which, unfortunately, have no bearing on processing :o (

Thanks


There isn't much room to go up in CPUs with your Q9300 as it is a mere 700 MHz from being the very fastest chip ever to exist for that socket. Depending on whether your video encoding is in a modern highly multi-threaded-encode codec like H.264 or an older single-threaded codec like MPEG-2, what hardware you will want to use will vary. I have a hunch that with such a long encode time that you are probably trying to do multi-pass encodes on HD video on modern codecs; old stuff like MPEG-2 shouldn't take nearly as long to encode.

If you are using a modern codec, you want more cores first and foremost. AMD sells a boatload more cores for the dollar than Intel does- look at the FX-8350 vs. i5-3570K/i7-3770K results in video editing. The $200ish FX-8350 is pretty close to the i7-3770K but costs a lot less. If you really want to encode video fast, look at dual Opteron setups. I would recommend a dual Socket C32 system such as two Opteron 4280 on an ATX motherboard such as an ASUS KCMA-D8 if you want a setup that's a bunch faster than a regular desktop but is not that expensive and is easy to put together. The price for the setup is about what you'd spend on an i7-3820 setup and will fit in a regular ATX case but the two 8-core Opterons will be quite a bit faster than the 4-core i7-3820. You can also use regular desktop 1.50 volt RAM and desktop heatsinks as well so it is a simple build. Windows 7 Ultimate or Professional will run perfectly fine on the dual CPU system as well. If you want even more speed but don't mind a more expensive build, get yourself a nice dual G34 board like a Supermicro H8DG6 and two 16-core Opteron 6200s. That will require a full-tower ATX case that fits extended ATX boards, 8 sticks of RAM, and some moderately pricey heatsinks (Noctuas), but will be MUCH faster than any regular single-socket desktop.

You can also get really crazy and put together a QUAD socket 64-core Opteron setup for about three grand and be considerably faster than any desktop will be for several years. Parts are decently available and not horribly priced but it's not quite as fall-off-a-log easy to build as a standard desktop setup. If you want more information I can help you as I actually am sitting on a not-yet-fully-fleshed-out quad socket Opteron setup :D 
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a b à CPUs
October 27, 2012 1:44:37 AM

9300 at 3.3-3.5 ghz is no joke it is still a really great proc but..... ddr2 ram is the shortfall not really because it is slow but because it is in short supply and costly
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October 27, 2012 3:20:11 AM

MU_Engineer said:
There isn't much room to go up in CPUs with your Q9300 as it is a mere 700 MHz from being the very fastest chip ever to exist for that socket. Depending on whether your video encoding is in a modern highly multi-threaded-encode codec like H.264 or an older single-threaded codec like MPEG-2, what hardware you will want to use will vary. I have a hunch that with such a long encode time that you are probably trying to do multi-pass encodes on HD video on modern codecs; old stuff like MPEG-2 shouldn't take nearly as long to encode.


Thank you for your very in-depth and informative reply - - in fact you've given me a lot of food for thought which will require some considerable research (and a search for the $$ :o )

That being said, as I proceed through this process, I may take you up on your offer for additional information and help.

By the way, you're correct in that I'm encoding with modern codec (H264), but only using a single pass. My original video is m2ts at 1080p with 5:1 audio, and the finished video has considerable "corrections" which I realize extend the encoding time considerably.

As for my Q9300 - - I have it stocked with 8mb of ram, but have never overclocked it (in fact, I've never overclocked any processor!!).

Thanks again.
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May 11, 2013 3:51:07 PM

MU_Engineer said:
FatherH said:
Hello,
I currently have the Intel Q9300 processor in my Asus P5Q Premium motherboard. I do a great deal of video editing (mostly for churches and charitable organizations), and the processing time is prohibitive (15 hours for a 1 hour video!).

My graphics card is the new GeForce GTX 660 Ti, so I have lots of GPU's (which, unfortunately, have no bearing on processing :o (

Thanks


There isn't much room to go up in CPUs with your Q9300 as it is a mere 700 MHz from being the very fastest chip ever to exist for that socket. Depending on whether your video encoding is in a modern highly multi-threaded-encode codec like H.264 or an older single-threaded codec like MPEG-2, what hardware you will want to use will vary. I have a hunch that with such a long encode time that you are probably trying to do multi-pass encodes on HD video on modern codecs; old stuff like MPEG-2 shouldn't take nearly as long to encode.

If you are using a modern codec, you want more cores first and foremost. AMD sells a boatload more cores for the dollar than Intel does- look at the FX-8350 vs. i5-3570K/i7-3770K results in video editing. The $200ish FX-8350 is pretty close to the i7-3770K but costs a lot less. If you really want to encode video fast, look at dual Opteron setups. I would recommend a dual Socket C32 system such as two Opteron 4280 on an ATX motherboard such as an ASUS KCMA-D8 if you want a setup that's a bunch faster than a regular desktop but is not that expensive and is easy to put together. The price for the setup is about what you'd spend on an i7-3820 setup and will fit in a regular ATX case but the two 8-core Opterons will be quite a bit faster than the 4-core i7-3820. You can also use regular desktop 1.50 volt RAM and desktop heatsinks as well so it is a simple build. Windows 7 Ultimate or Professional will run perfectly fine on the dual CPU system as well. If you want even more speed but don't mind a more expensive build, get yourself a nice dual G34 board like a Supermicro H8DG6 and two 16-core Opteron 6200s. That will require a full-tower ATX case that fits extended ATX boards, 8 sticks of RAM, and some moderately pricey heatsinks (Noctuas), but will be MUCH faster than any regular single-socket desktop.

You can also get really crazy and put together a QUAD socket 64-core Opteron setup for about three grand and be considerably faster than any desktop will be for several years. Parts are decently available and not horribly priced but it's not quite as fall-off-a-log easy to build as a standard desktop setup. If you want more information I can help you as I actually am sitting on a not-yet-fully-fleshed-out quad socket Opteron setup :D 



It's been almost 7 months since your kind offer to give me some additional information - - and if the offer is still there, I'd appreciate receiving some right now :) 

I think the time has come to bite the bullet and upgrade my Motherboard, Processor and Memory. These will need to fit into my Mid Tower case (Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX), and work with my Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti graphics card and accommodate 6 hard drives and three DVD-R/RW drives, as well as a couple of USB 3.0 devices and some USB 2.0 devices.

My research to date has me leaning towards one of the Intel Core i7-3770 processors, however, they are very pricey. I did a comparison between this "family" and the AMD-FX 8300/8320/8350 and, although the AMD processors are considerably lower in price, they're also much lower in performance in most, if not all areas tested (see www.cpu-world.com/ ). I wonder if you've got an opinion on how much these differences will actually be seen/noticed when put to the test in a video editing environment??

Once I've got the decision about the processor made, I'll then turn to which motherboard and what memory should be used. Any input you can provide will be most appreciated.

Thanks


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a c 99 à CPUs
May 11, 2013 6:15:47 PM

FatherH said:


It's been almost 7 months since your kind offer to give me some additional information - - and if the offer is still there, I'd appreciate receiving some right now :) 

I think the time has come to bite the bullet and upgrade my Motherboard, Processor and Memory. These will need to fit into my Mid Tower case (Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX), and work with my Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti graphics card and accommodate 6 hard drives and three DVD-R/RW drives, as well as a couple of USB 3.0 devices and some USB 2.0 devices.

My research to date has me leaning towards one of the Intel Core i7-3770 processors, however, they are very pricey. I did a comparison between this "family" and the AMD-FX 8300/8320/8350 and, although the AMD processors are considerably lower in price, they're also much lower in performance in most, if not all areas tested (see www.cpu-world.com/ ). I wonder if you've got an opinion on how much these differences will actually be seen/noticed when put to the test in a video editing environment??

Once I've got the decision about the processor made, I'll then turn to which motherboard and what memory should be used. Any input you can provide will be most appreciated.

Thanks



The "commodity socket" (LGA1155) i7s such as the i7-3770K have never been particularly good values. All they have over the next chip down in the SKU list (the top Core i5, such as the i5-3570K) is 25% more L3 cache, 100 MHz, HyperThreading, and about a $100 bump in the price tag. The real "must have" in any of these chips is overclockability which any K series chip has. The non-K series chips (e.g. i5-3570 with no "K" suffix) are not overclockable and of little interest to enthusiasts. The i5-3570K is much less expensive than the i7-3770K, still overclockable, and you don't gain that much in real-world usage from the extra cache or HyperThreading- at least not enough to justify the big bump in price tag.

The next step up from the i5-3570K for an Intel guy would be the i7-3930K. It uses the "enthusiast" socket LGA2011 instead of LGA1155 and has six cores compared to a maximum of four for any of the LGA1155 chips. The i7-3930K is overclockable as well and is considerably faster than the i5-3570K in multithreaded tasks like video encoding. It is about twice as expensive than the i5-3570K though, and LGA2011 motherboards are likewise much pricier than LGA1155 units. If it were my money, I'd pretty well only consider the i5-3570K for an Intel CPU.

AMD's CPUs are very, very good for their price range and even above for heavily threaded stuff like video encoding. The FX-8350 is pretty much identical to the i5-3570K/i7-3770K in multithreaded video encoding with codecs like H.264. It does not do as well on poorly-threaded things like MPEG-2 encoding or games compared to Intel CPUs, but they do cost a lot less. I personally run AMD CPUs since my heavy-hitting tasks are all heavily multithreaded and I get a lot more bang for the buck from AMD's parts (especially since I up the ante and use server parts- E5/E7 Xeons are EXTREMELY expensive, not all that many Opterons are very pricey.)

My experience with the hugely-threaded server setups is more that you can encode multiple videos at once rather than encode one really, really fast. H.264 really only scales well up to about 8-10 cores. It will use more than 8-10 cores but performance doesn't really increase past that point. Having a 64-core monster would just allow you to encode 6-8 videos simultaneously at full speed rather than encoding one video blindingly fast.

So in short, I'd go with an AMD FX-83xx unit if you are limited in cash and an Intel i5-3570K if you have a little more to spend.
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a b à CPUs
May 12, 2013 1:13:16 PM

Overclock the 9300 and buy some ssd's
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