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Help! In a Panic : Models are coming...

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Anonymous
July 28, 2005 9:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello!

An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
want to get too far away.

The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
nervous and am unsure of what to do really.

I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...

I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :

zoom
their makeup (which they would do themselves)
changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)

If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
TO DO I would be so relieved.

Please give me suggestions.

Thank you!

More about : panic models coming

Anonymous
July 28, 2005 9:49:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Yikes! Do not envy your position. But you did say "test shootin" so
maybe it's not as bad as it seems. If you have access to a garage, get
some different dark-colored cloth that you can use as a backdrop. Get
something that have a velvety look to them. When you position the
back-drop cloths, make sure that they are large enough to cover the
area of the pic and they have some texture to them (waves, ripples,
etc.). This scene should be a few feet into the garage - enough to get
the reflected light from the day but not direct light. If you have
reflectors, position them to the sides of the backdrop. Have a chair
or stool for your models to sit, lean, put one leg up on, and a fan for
blowing hair around if you have one. Shoot close and tight with a good
close up lens (105mm) and use a low power fill flash. Shoot the models
from a couple of different angles to get a contrast in lighting and to
determine their best side. And lastly, find a friend that will let you
do some test shots on. Happy snapping!

n wrote:
> Hello!
>
> An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> want to get too far away.
>
> The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
>
> I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
>
> I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
>
> zoom
> their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
>
> If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> TO DO I would be so relieved.
>
> Please give me suggestions.
>
> Thank you!
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:11:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thank you everybody so far!

Great ideas. I will definitely try and get a fan, and have started
thinking about chairs / stuff for them to pose against.

Backdrops...indoors it will be tough to do, but i am thinking...

and great advice on that encouragement and so on

actually so many good ideas, having more than one in the room at a time
is prudent.

i will look through the fashion mags and model sites...

in another post somebody mentioned getting some aluminium foil crinkled
up and putting that on a frame and using it to fill light. That sounds
like a good way for me to get some emergency lighting equipment. I am
thinking of going over to the store and getting any kind of lighting
that might illuminate indoors better... i am still quite anxious, will
have to get over that before they arrive or it will be a total disaster
as they will pick up on it for sure.

At least i can put some music on in the background.

i have a bed in the room too.... there is no hiding it!
Related resources
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:13:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Oh, one more thing, is there a sort of jargon or a collection of stock
phrases that you use often when giving direction to the models?
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:25:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 09:13:15 -0700, yeeehi@gmail.com wrote:

>Oh, one more thing, is there a sort of jargon or a collection of stock
>phrases that you use often when giving direction to the models?

"C'mon, Baby, work it!"
"Give it to me!"
"Ooh, that's good!"
"Harder, now. Oh, yeah, great!"
"OK, change positions!"
"You KNOW what I want!"

Or so I've been told.

--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
funktionality.blogspot.com
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:56:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Tell them your camera broke. Then think of something better to do!

Bill Crocker



"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Hello!
>
> An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> want to get too far away.
>
> The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
>
> I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
>
> I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
>
> zoom
> their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
>
> If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> TO DO I would be so relieved.
>
> Please give me suggestions.
>
> Thank you!
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 2:00:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Hello!
>
> An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> want to get too far away.
>
> The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
>
> I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
>
> I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
>
> zoom
> their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
>
> If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> TO DO I would be so relieved.

Go visit a "model" web site, take a look at all the standard shots, and
simply try to duplicate those. Alternatively, pick up a few mags and copy
the poses and shots in them. Otherwise, your screwed.

>
> Please give me suggestions.
>
> Thank you!
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 2:12:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thank you everybody so far!


Great ideas. I will definitely try and get a fan, and have started
thinking about chairs / stuff for them to pose against.


Backdrops...indoors it will be tough to do, but i am thinking...


and great advice on that encouragement and so on


actually so many good ideas, having more than one in the room at a time

is prudent.


i will look through the fashion mags and model sites...


in another post somebody mentioned getting some aluminium foil crinkled

up and putting that on a frame and using it to fill light. That sounds
like a good way for me to get some emergency lighting equipment. I am
thinking of going over to the store and getting any kind of lighting
that might illuminate indoors better... i am still quite anxious, will
have to get over that before they arrive or it will be a total disaster

as they will pick up on it for sure.


At least i can put some music on in the background.


i have a bed in the room too.... there is no hiding it!

Are there any stock phrases or jargon that you use to provide direction
to models?
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 2:14:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <ZO2dnWlfLdE4fnXfRVn-iQ@comcast.com>,
"Bill Crocker" <wcrocker007@comcast.net> wrote:

> Tell them your camera broke. Then think of something better to do!
>
> Bill Crocker
>
>
>
> "n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > Hello!
> >
> > An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> > weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> > used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> > using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> > nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> > want to get too far away.
> >
> > The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> > nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
> >
> > I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> > about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> > never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
> >
> > I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> > only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
> >
> > zoom
> > their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> > changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
> >
> > If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> > TO DO I would be so relieved.
> >
> > Please give me suggestions.
> >
> > Thank you!
> >

Sounds like these are not professional models but girls who need a
portfolio to try to become professional models and who are doing this
through an agency who is not a professional agency. If they were a
professional agency they would not have picked someone without a studio
or experience.

Is this a deal where you are trading your work for the girl's shots? Are
you being paid by the agency or by the models?

It is always a wise move when doing this type of work to have lots of
helpers around in case of any future accusations regarding the
photographer's conduct towards the models. Among these helpers would be
the expected hairdressers and makeup artists that would always be at a
model shoot. Some of these helpers should be female.

Do you have prepared model releases for these girls to sign as well as
someone to witness the signatures? Just read up on the Carmen Diaz case
that was just tried in CA.

--
To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 3:04:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I will get some of that white foam core. I have been doing manual white
balance recently:

Using my canon d10 i photograph something white in the location of the
future photos with the expected iso / shutter speed / aperture
then i open the menu and go to custom white balance
then i choose select
i press the middle button on the right to choose the just taken photo
of white
i have the custom white balance flower selected for subsequent shots

But how will something grey in the picture help me?

I am used to taking candid shots and street scenes and am confident in
that setting, and showed an impressive portfolio ( i think it must have
been a good impression) of this work to the agency. One load of models
were leaving and another load arriving and they needed to get some
shots done and apparently some of the models badly needed some test
shots taken. It is a decent agency, and they are giving me a chance.

If they were just walking by or sitting at a table I would have no
problems at all, its what i normally do but they are professionals, and
i think i am afraid of expectations and because this time people will
actually be coming to see me for the purpose of getting some good
photos...

I am just a bit worried that it will degenerate into something like
doing passport photos, face front, left right, ok, bye. But i have had
some great suggestions so far and they will help.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 3:36:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Owamanga, thanks. I always shoot RAW now. It helps me rescue a lot of
pictures that i take in available light and, well, basically just helps
me rescue pictures!

Is it not too hard to use photoshop to put in a snazzy background or do
those sorts of pictures usually look phoney? I have never done it
before.

Walls are white but i will try and find something dark to have as an
alternative background.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 4:09:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Telling them not to come is wise!
I am beginning to think of asking them to just send one or maybe two,
that way if things flop it won't be too bad for everyone. Taking the
shots outside in natural lighting is what i am good at and used to.

I think if i do stuff inside, in a room without proper lighting, well,
it would be tough to get anything close to what they would be hoping
for.

So thanks for this suggestion, as i am a bit clearer now about what i
am not going to try and do... I hope it doesn't rain!

I still have time to e mail, i think i will say just send a couple.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 5:02:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Your clothing is causing some serious moiré issues with the high-resolution
sensor in my professional digital camera. Please remove them."

<yeeehi@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1122567195.793369.257860@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Oh, one more thing, is there a sort of jargon or a collection of stock
> phrases that you use often when giving direction to the models?
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 6:03:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

> Please give me suggestions.
>
> Thank you!
>
------------

Quick, post a B I G notice that all models have to be completely nude while
you apply their make-up.
July 28, 2005 7:28:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Hello!
>
> An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> want to get too far away.
>
> The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
>
> I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
>
> I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
>
> zoom
> their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
>
> If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> TO DO I would be so relieved.
>
> Please give me suggestions.
>
> Thank you!
>

Hi there.

What you really need is some actual assistance on the day.
I'll be right over!!

You will need to know, before they arrive, what sort of work the Models are
expecting. If they are expecting to do Fashion, then there is no point being
set up for Glamour or Nude, and vice versa.

If they are experienced models, (seems unlikely), you, as an amateur, will
only get the poses and expressions they want you to get.

If they are beginners, (very likely), they will need lots of encourgement,
reassurance, and advice on posing. If you are not able to provide that, the
Agency will never again let you near their Models.

Find a couple of photos with simple poses and lighting, and work out how
they were set up. Then just try to repeat the same set up with the models.

Roy G
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 8:01:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 11:04:14 -0700, n wrote:

> But how will something grey in the picture help me?

Gray is white, but not as bright!

Actually, white cards are generally used for setting white
balance, but I think that C Wright had something else in mind.
First, 18% gray cards are often used for setting exposure levels.
The description of Kodak's R-27 Gray Card (in one of B&H's nearly
700 page photo sourcebooks) says that it is also useful for
adjusting lighting ratios and to check lighting distribution
(presumable much easier with a good meter, not your camera).
Despite the precise "18%", there's a good bit of latitude, and
photographers use all kinds of handy substitutes with success, one
common one being taking an exposure reading using the back of your
hand. Obviously this won't work for everyone. :) 

Since gray is color neutral, C Wright may have meant that in
addition to using the gray card to determine proper exposures,
pictures of the gray cards could later be used to help set your
white balance during processing on your computer. This would
require that you shoot RAW files, not JPEG or TIFF. If you don't
shoot RAW and will be taking shots using different lighting
configurations, and your camera has multiple custom setups, you
could save time by presetting the different white balances in your
camera's custom settings before the models arrive. Then you
wouldn't have to waste time resetting white balances for each model.
But if you are able to do this, test it first using friends as model
substitutes so you won't be all thumbs when the real ones show up.


> If they were just walking by or sitting at a table I would have no
> problems at all, its what i normally do but they are professionals, and
> i think i am afraid of expectations and because this time people will
> actually be coming to see me for the purpose of getting some good
> photos...

If you explain that (and your inexperience) to the models they may
go out of their way to help make your job easier. The might even
give you some useful tips unless they are total novices too. :) 
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 8:38:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 16:01:37 -0400, ASAAR <caught@22.com> wrote:

>On 28 Jul 2005 11:04:14 -0700, n wrote:
>
>> But how will something grey in the picture help me?
>
> Gray is white, but not as bright!
>
> Actually, white cards are generally used for setting white
>balance, but I think that C Wright had something else in mind.
>First, 18% gray cards are often used for setting exposure levels.
>The description of Kodak's R-27 Gray Card (in one of B&H's nearly
>700 page photo sourcebooks) says that it is also useful for
>adjusting lighting ratios and to check lighting distribution
>(presumable much easier with a good meter, not your camera).
>Despite the precise "18%", there's a good bit of latitude, and
>photographers use all kinds of handy substitutes with success, one
>common one being taking an exposure reading using the back of your
>hand. Obviously this won't work for everyone. :) 

The palm of the hand not the back. You must not have done this very
much.


*****************************************************

"It is a good thing to read books, and need not be a
bad thing to write them, but in any case, it is a
pious thing to collect them."

Fredrick Locker-Lampson
(1821-1895)
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 9:48:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 7/28/05 11:11 AM, in article
1122567064.929893.31320@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "yeeehi@gmail.com"
<yeeehi@gmail.com> wrote:

> Thank you everybody so far!
>
snip
> in another post somebody mentioned getting some aluminium foil crinkled
> up and putting that on a frame and using it to fill light. That sounds
> like a good way for me to get some emergency lighting equipment. I am
> thinking of going over to the store and getting any kind of lighting
> that might illuminate indoors better
> i have a bed in the room too.... there is no hiding it!
>
Don't just go to the store and get any kind of lighting! Go to a
photography shop and get lights made for photography. You will have a
terrible time trying to white balance just any kind of lighting. As far as
fill light, if you don't have enough lighting, a large piece of white foam
core board works well. Just have someone hold it at the proper angle to
reflect light onto the shadowed side of the model (this works well outdoors
as well). Also, for each lighting setup have one of the models hold a light
grey card for a test shot; this can be used for white balance during the
processing stage.
How did you get yourself into this?
Chuck
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 10:19:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 11:04:14 -0700, "n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I will get some of that white foam core. I have been doing manual white
>balance recently:

Shoot this RAW, then you can forget about the white balance for now.

Keep it simple.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 10:22:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 16:38:45 -0500, John A. Stovall wrote:

> The palm of the hand not the back. You must not have done this very
> much.

That's right, I haven't. I can see that it might be easier using
the palm, but would there be any significant difference? Not with
my hands, I don't think. But I'd guess the palm would be a safer
bet for most people because palms don't get tanned to varying
degrees the way backs of some hands might. Probably the same type
of difference for those with different skin coloration too, where
palms would work better, if not perfectly.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 10:38:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1122552583.983144.288700@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Hello!
>
> An agency is sending round some real, live professional models this
> weekend and i am to do test-shooting for them. Its all new for me. I am
> used to taking candid shots out-doors, not a studio setting. I will be
> using my apartment for some shots and will do the remainder outdoors
> nearby, because about 8 will be arriving over the weekend and i don't
> want to get too far away.
>
> The place is looking / smelling spick and span already. But i am
> nervous and am unsure of what to do really.
>
> I have taken some shots of people around here before so have some ideas
> about nice backgrounds, but not too many. There is a pool but i have
> never shot anybody there or indeed anywhere near a pool...
>
> I have no ideas about poses / contortions to put them in. I think the
> only variety i can get from one shot to another would be by :
>
> zoom
> their makeup (which they would do themselves)
> changing their hair (but some are guys so cant do much there)
>
> If anybody can just give me some ideas about WHAT THE *** I AM SUPPOSED
> TO DO I would be so relieved.
>
> Please give me suggestions.

Tell them that you can't do it and learn some more about it so you don't
get in over your head.

Better to have no work out there then to have bad work out there,

--

http://home.nc.rr.com/christianbonanno/
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 11:25:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 11:36:52 -0700, "n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Owamanga, thanks. I always shoot RAW now. It helps me rescue a lot of
>pictures that i take in available light and, well, basically just helps
>me rescue pictures!

It's statements like that which give RAW a bad name, but.. whatever.
It just happens that white balance isn't one of the things you need to
get right at the shoot. Exposure, composition, lighting, mood, focus
etc have still got to be right at the time of the shoot.

One thing I have noticed watching some model shoots (I don't do them
myself) is the model moves from pose to pose quite slowly, so shutter
speeds can be quite slow, which allows you to include ambient
lighting. A tripod would be sensible, but don't limit your entire
shoot to being tripod-based.

Lighting is *essential*. It can be candles, it can be christmas tree
lights wrapped around her, it can be a couple of 150w tungsten bulbs,
or a flash bounced from the ceiling, natural light from a window or a
careful mixture of many types. If she's very still (laying down for
example) you can even do long tripod exposures and light her with a
flashlight. Try lots of different things, lots of different ways.

>Is it not too hard to use photoshop to put in a snazzy background or do
>those sorts of pictures usually look phoney? I have never done it
>before.

It can be done quite well with today's tools. You'll want to do a dry
run first before the models get there to figure through any issues,
but basically you need to evenly light the background, preferably with
a unique color (such as bright green or blue) that isn't going to be
found on the subject.

Then in photoshop you can select the background based on it's color
and remove it.

It can (well, it will) look phoney, yes. I wouldn't set out to do this
unless I had a strong reason to do so. There are plugins that do a
better job of the selection than photoshop can on it's own.

>Walls are white but i will try and find something dark to have as an
>alternative background.

White is good in this respect: The walls are whatever color you light
them.

Office supply stores occasionally sell large pieces of black foam core
board too, but the simplest background is a huge piece of fabric
chucked over a large frame, or hung from the ceiling somehow. Do you
*have* to shoot indoors?

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 12:34:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

It is very exciting reading your posts!

I have decided to go for it and let them send as many models as they
want to throw at me :) 

A lot of my nerves are coming from the big difference between taking a
casual, no lose snapshot or a passerby and taking a shot of a
professional who is arriving for the specific purpose... Now if
anything goes wrong then it is totally my responsibility. eg i just
completely drained my d10 battery and then recharged it completely. 6
hours later i used it 5 minutes and it was flat.Thank goodness that
didn't happen tomorrow! Hasn't occured before. I left the battery in
the camera and it wasn't doing anything afaik.

I have a single 1 gig flash memory for the camera. That gives 176 RAW
shots. It takes an hour to completely recharge the battery and longer
to transfer a gig into my computer, so i am tempted to shoot large
fine, especially if i have 2 models around at the same time.

Those lighting suggestions, and the mood, focus and so on, thank you...

I am going to find some more backgrounds for shooting and do some test
shots, and get some candles!
July 29, 2005 1:36:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

If your camera has no sync for connecting external flash - i would suggest
working outdoors as much as possible,
as natural light is always better than the severe light spewed from internal
flashes from compact cameras.
As for poses and ideas - have a squint at my site - i've done more than my
fair share of models, experienced and otherwise


Rich

www.digitalmood.co.uk



"n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122577781.481005.143280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Telling them not to come is wise!
> I am beginning to think of asking them to just send one or maybe two,
> that way if things flop it won't be too bad for everyone. Taking the
> shots outside in natural lighting is what i am good at and used to.
>
> I think if i do stuff inside, in a room without proper lighting, well,
> it would be tough to get anything close to what they would be hoping
> for.
>
> So thanks for this suggestion, as i am a bit clearer now about what i
> am not going to try and do... I hope it doesn't rain!
>
> I still have time to e mail, i think i will say just send a couple.
>
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 3:51:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 20:34:07 -0700, n wrote:

> A lot of my nerves are coming from the big difference between taking a
> casual, no lose snapshot or a passerby and taking a shot of a
> professional who is arriving for the specific purpose... Now if
> anything goes wrong then it is totally my responsibility. eg i just
> completely drained my d10 battery and then recharged it completely. 6
> hours later i used it 5 minutes and it was flat.Thank goodness that
> didn't happen tomorrow! Hasn't occured before. I left the battery in
> the camera and it wasn't doing anything afaik.
>
> I have a single 1 gig flash memory for the camera. That gives 176 RAW
> shots. It takes an hour to completely recharge the battery and longer
> to transfer a gig into my computer, so i am tempted to shoot large
> fine, especially if i have 2 models around at the same time.
>
> Those lighting suggestions, and the mood, focus and so on, thank you...
>
> I am going to find some more backgrounds for shooting and do some test
> shots, and get some candles!

Do yourself a favor and get a second battery before you get the
candles. I could probably give you several good reasons why, but
you should be able to figure out most of them if you stop and think
about it.
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 4:16:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 28 Jul 2005 20:34:07 -0700, n wrote:

> A lot of my nerves are coming from the big difference between taking a
> casual, no lose snapshot or a passerby and taking a shot of a
> professional who is arriving for the specific purpose... Now if
> anything goes wrong then it is totally my responsibility. eg i just
> completely drained my d10 battery and then recharged it completely. 6
> hours later i used it 5 minutes and it was flat.Thank goodness that
> didn't happen tomorrow! Hasn't occured before. I left the battery in
> the camera and it wasn't doing anything afaik.
>
> I have a single 1 gig flash memory for the camera. That gives 176 RAW
> shots. It takes an hour to completely recharge the battery and longer
> to transfer a gig into my computer, so i am tempted to shoot large
> fine, especially if i have 2 models around at the same time.
>
> Those lighting suggestions, and the mood, focus and so on, thank you...
>
> I am going to find some more backgrounds for shooting and do some test
> shots, and get some candles!

And I should have added - get more memory if not having enough is
going to make you switch from RAW to JPG. I shoot for my own
personal pleasure, so whether I shot RAW or not doesn't matter.
Your situation is different and you're not yet thinking like a pro.
You don't have a reputation yet. Try to avoid habits that lead to
people saying things about you such as "I had to waste an hour while
that guy recharged his (get this) only battery!" or "We could have
used several of his shots but he could only provide jpegs and they
were a bit too soft."

Why does it take over an hour to transfer 1GB into your computer?
I *hope* you're not doing it with your camera using a USB cable. If
you had a second 1GB card (you *need* one), the first one could be
transferring its files using a cheap card reader while you continue
taking pictures using the second card (which I *know* you will have
bought. <g>) Models may not appreciate unnecessary delays and you
probably don't want to give them material for amusing tales to tell
about the photographer from hell. :) 
July 29, 2005 4:16:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On 28 Jul 2005 20:34:07 -0700, n wrote:
>
>
>>A lot of my nerves are coming from the big difference between taking a
>>casual, no lose snapshot or a passerby and taking a shot of a
>>professional who is arriving for the specific purpose... Now if
>>anything goes wrong then it is totally my responsibility. eg i just
>>completely drained my d10 battery and then recharged it completely. 6
>>hours later i used it 5 minutes and it was flat.Thank goodness that
>>didn't happen tomorrow! Hasn't occured before. I left the battery in
>>the camera and it wasn't doing anything afaik.
>>
>>I have a single 1 gig flash memory for the camera. That gives 176 RAW
>>shots. It takes an hour to completely recharge the battery and longer
>>to transfer a gig into my computer, so i am tempted to shoot large
>>fine, especially if i have 2 models around at the same time.
>>
>>Those lighting suggestions, and the mood, focus and so on, thank you...
>>
>>I am going to find some more backgrounds for shooting and do some test
>>shots, and get some candles!
>
>
> And I should have added - get more memory if not having enough is
> going to make you switch from RAW to JPG. I shoot for my own
> personal pleasure, so whether I shot RAW or not doesn't matter.
> Your situation is different and you're not yet thinking like a pro.
> You don't have a reputation yet. Try to avoid habits that lead to
> people saying things about you such as "I had to waste an hour while
> that guy recharged his (get this) only battery!" or "We could have
> used several of his shots but he could only provide jpegs and they
> were a bit too soft."
>
> Why does it take over an hour to transfer 1GB into your computer?
> I *hope* you're not doing it with your camera using a USB cable. If
> you had a second 1GB card (you *need* one), the first one could be
> transferring its files using a cheap card reader while you continue
> taking pictures using the second card (which I *know* you will have
> bought. <g>) Models may not appreciate unnecessary delays and you
> probably don't want to give them material for amusing tales to tell
> about the photographer from hell. :) 
>


I think he said this was a freebie for him, but considering the
$100/hour modeling fee, one should buy a pocket full of batteries and
memory cards.

--
jer
email reply - I am not a 'ten'
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 5:40:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 00:10:48 -0500, Jer wrote:

> I think he said this was a freebie for him, but considering the
> $100/hour modeling fee, one should buy a pocket full of batteries and
> memory cards.

I didn't forget that. But it's still worth making sure that any
impressions left are all good, whether the job is gratis or for pay.
Too many ways to take the "$100/hour modeling fee" so I won't try.
:) 
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 6:14:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 7/28/05 1:04 PM, in article
1122573854.344436.93190@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com, "n"
<total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

snip
>
> But how will something grey in the picture help me?
>
Snip

To clarify - An 18% grey card is commonly used for exposure measurement and
it would not be a bad idea to use one of those for your session (just for
exposure). However, the grey that I was talking about is a very light grey
card, some manufacturers make a flexible plastic one. I know that it sounds
a bit counter intuitive to use light grey for 'white' balance but many
photographers recommend it, and it works well! If you shoot raw all you
have to do is click on the light grey and your image will correctly white
balance. Then use that white balance for all other images shot under the
same lighting setup. Obviously you can tweak it some to achieve a pleasing
skin tone.
Chuck
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 9:16:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Panic Over!

The agencies man, the out of country at the time supervisor of the
person i spoke to, sent me an email: we don't need your help scouting,
we will use our professionals, we don't need your help doing test
shoots, we will use our professionals.

So, that is a relief. And a bit of a disapointment, but better me
disappointed than face an upset model, right?!

Just getting prepared in this thread alone i learned a lot so it has
been a good experience for me even though i never got to take any
photos. However, i did meet a nice receptionist and hope to do so again
next week perhaps.

very funny comments about :get this, he only has one battery! haha! I
can just imagine. So really everyone has been done a service and no
cost all round.

So, you guys, you must have a backup for everything? 2 digi cams, 2
lenses (haha!) (I have got 2!), 2 batteries (rotflmao), 2 lights...,

So, how do the guys that are Pros actually become pro?

Anyway, thank goodness i am not going to be facing an angry supermodel
tomorrow, furious because my mouse stopped working on my computer and
then my battery mysteriously went flat! hoho!

Thanks for the help everyone :) 
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 9:40:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Is it not too hard to use photoshop to put in a snazzy background or do
>those sorts of pictures usually look phoney? I have never done it
>before.


It can be done quite well with today's tools. You'll want to do a dry
run first before the models get there to figure through any issues,
but basically you need to evenly light the background, preferably with
a unique color (such as bright green or blue) that isn't going to be
found on the subject.

Then in photoshop you can select the background based on it's color
and remove it.


It can (well, it will) look phoney, yes. I wouldn't set out to do this
unless I had a strong reason to do so. There are plugins that do a
better job of the selection than photoshop can on it's own.


Which are the best plugins for this do you think?
(Actually, which are the best plugins period would also be interesting
for me!)
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 2:07:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

George, this was all real and i write in good faith.
July 29, 2005 3:08:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 29 Jul 2005 05:16:34 -0700, n wrote:

> Panic Over!
>
> The agencies man, the out of country at the time supervisor of the
> person i spoke to, sent me an email: we don't need your help scouting,
> we will use our professionals, we don't need your help doing test
> shoots, we will use our professionals.

Maybe he saw this thread?
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 5:12:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 29 Jul 2005 05:16:34 -0700, "n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

>So, you guys, you must have a backup for everything? 2 digi cams, 2
>lenses (haha!) (I have got 2!), 2 batteries (rotflmao), 2 lights...,

Batteries are cheap, so you do want to have spares. CF cards aren't
that expensive, so you do want to have extras.

Two lenses: If it's a DSLR, you have more than one anyway to expand
your capabilities. As for insurance, if one fails you'll have to
change your shooting style - but can switch and carry on shooting.

A whole spare DLSR? - For what you are doing, the payoff isn't going
to be there.

Extra speedlights - if you can afford them, why not. Multiple flash
setups are useful, and extra units provide a backup too.

>So, how do the guys that are Pros actually become pro?

Someone pays them enough to live on.

>Anyway, thank goodness i am not going to be facing an angry supermodel
>tomorrow, furious because my mouse stopped working on my computer and
>then my battery mysteriously went flat! hoho!

It wouldn't have been a *super*model, that much I can guarantee.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 6:26:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 29 Jul 2005 05:40:34 -0700, "n" <total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Which are the best plugins for this do you think?
>(Actually, which are the best plugins period would also be interesting
>for me!)

For this job, your answers here:
http://www.digital-photography.org/prepress_graphicsoft...

I doubt anyone can tell you the more general 'best plugins' because
it's a matter of personal taste. The one I always use with photographs
is a sharpening plugin - I bought two different ones, and use them
both for different jobs.

Photoshop is a huge tool for many different tasks, only one of which
is photography. Some people paint with it, some people make web
graphics with it, some people make titles, 3d textures, some just do
compositing.

Just to give you an idea of the plugin genres that you may find useful
for the digital darkroom:

Sharpening / unsharp mask.
(Many)

Noise reduction.
(Many)

De-blotching (one of the best is...)
http://www.asf.com/products/plugins/airpro/pluginAIRPRO...

Rescaling / Enlarging
http://www.ononesoftware.com/detail.php?prodLine_id=2

Filteration, filter effects & color correction.
(millions)

Also check the dreamsuite auto FX stuff, very nice:
http://www.autofx.com/

...and Flaming Pear...
http://www.flamingpear.com/

There are thousands more out there that do some other wacky and stupid
stuff, start hunting here:

http://thepluginsite.com/

http://www.powerretouche.com/

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 6:31:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I don't believe it is April 1st, is it?!?
Your handle is quite fitting.
You got all the 'experts' going. LOL!


On 7/29/05 7:16 AM, in article
1122639394.444836.257840@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "n"
<total_utter_carp@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Panic Over!
>
> The agencies man, the out of country at the time supervisor of the
> person i spoke to, sent me an email: we don't need your help scouting,
> we will use our professionals, we don't need your help doing test
> shoots, we will use our professionals.
>
> So, that is a relief. And a bit of a disapointment, but better me
> disappointed than face an upset model, right?!
>
> Just getting prepared in this thread alone i learned a lot so it has
> been a good experience for me even though i never got to take any
> photos. However, i did meet a nice receptionist and hope to do so again
> next week perhaps.
>
> very funny comments about :get this, he only has one battery! haha! I
> can just imagine. So really everyone has been done a service and no
> cost all round.
>
> So, you guys, you must have a backup for everything? 2 digi cams, 2
> lenses (haha!) (I have got 2!), 2 batteries (rotflmao), 2 lights...,
>
> So, how do the guys that are Pros actually become pro?
>
> Anyway, thank goodness i am not going to be facing an angry supermodel
> tomorrow, furious because my mouse stopped working on my computer and
> then my battery mysteriously went flat! hoho!
>
> Thanks for the help everyone :) 
>


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