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Gaming Rig Help

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June 21, 2012 6:38:10 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: (Over the summer sometime)

Budget Range: (500-600) Before Rebates

System Usage from Most to Least Important: (Gaming, Software (UDK, After Effects, Sony Vegas), 1080p movies, etc)

Parts Not Required: (keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS, Graphics card, disk drive (I plan on getting a good gpu later in the year, I have a managable one at the moment: ati radeon 3470. not a gaming card but usable)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: (ncix.ca and canadacomputers.com)

Country: (Canada)

Parts Preferences: Not cheaply made parts like diablotek I guess. I like the ASUS M5A99X EVO motherboard I've selected too.

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Yes

Monitor Resolution: (1920x1080)

Additional Comments: Overclocking is a gray area, don't know much about that. Crossfire is neccecary so in the future I can buy an identical card to the one I pick later on once games get more demanding. Also I do not know whether cases come with cpu fans, or if the cpu comes with a heat sink/fan or whatever, someone want to explain that to me :/ 
This is my first time making a build although I have taken apart computers entirely, know where all the parts go, know how to care for the cpu, etc. I've kinda cannabalized a couple of computers for the one I'm using right now, and its kinda crap.

Power Supply (iCAN PS-200 600W ATX Power Supply with 14cm fan)
= $38 (Canada Computers)

Motherboard (Asus M5A99X EVO Socket AM3+)
= $125 (Canada Computers)
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=335&item_id=046454

CPU (AMD Bulldozer X6 FX-6100 (95W) Six Core Socket AM3+, 3.3GHz)
= $145 (Canada Computers)
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=64&item_id=042550

RAM (Corsair Memory 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1333MHz)
= $45 (Canada Computers)
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=609&item_id=040992

Case (MSI Interceptor Series Raptor ATX Mid Tower Case USB3.0)
= $57 (Canada Computers)
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=6_112&item_id=047157
^Probably wont get this due to availablility but something similar would be nice.

HDD (SATA3 6.0Gb/s 500GB 16MB Cache Seagate)
= $80 (Canada Computers)
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=15_1086_210_212&item_id=041042
All of the above is before rebates

Subtotal = $490
Total (+tax) = $553.7

One thing to note, I am not keeping that crappy power supply, I'm shooting for more of a 700W+ PSU.
Also I'm preeetttyyy sure all these parts are compatible. All ATX things
Another thing to note about the motherboard, the CPU is compatible but it requires a BIOS upgrade. How would I do that...


Anyways thanks, and be critical, educate me and w/e. :)  If you say no to a specific part, please explain why, I like learning about this stuff.

More about : gaming rig

June 21, 2012 6:52:02 PM

You didn't mention the graphics card, but I highly doubt you even need 600w let alone 700w.

ican power supply is complete garbage.

That cpu is a very poor choice for gaming, one of the worse, it performs on par with the FX4100.
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June 21, 2012 7:03:22 PM

geekapproved said:
You didn't mention the graphics card, but I highly doubt you even need 600w let alone 700w.

ican power supply is complete garbage.

That cpu is a very poor choice for gaming, one of the worse, it performs on par with the FX4100.

600W is enough for a high-ish end graphics card along with everything else? Oh wow I overestimated that. And yeah I was not planning on that power supply anyways.

Would you recommend the AMD Phenom II X4 955 (Quad 3.2ghz) in its place? If not what would you recommend? My knowledge in this area of what makes a cpu good for gaming in nonexsistant.
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June 21, 2012 8:00:34 PM

Oh and does anyone think this is all compatible?
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June 21, 2012 9:48:54 PM

I can't recommend the Corsair PSU's enough. And 500W should be enough, but I'd get 600W if you can. It sucks to be stuck having to spend money on something as mundane as a PSU to upgrade your components.

I also recommend going for an i5-2500K build. I just built a friend a computer for about $640 with an i5-2500k *with* a GPU. He already had a couple of things, though, like a case and optical drive.

$600 for what you need for an i5-2500K build is definitely not unreasonable.

If you're dead set on the parts you've got, though, then yes, they are compatible with each other. Not as fast as it could be for the price, but compatible.
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June 21, 2012 9:56:28 PM

bavarians6 said:
I can't recommend the Corsair PSU's enough. And 500W should be enough, but I'd get 600W if you can. It sucks to be stuck having to spend money on something as mundane as a PSU to upgrade your components.

I also recommend going for an i5-2500K build. I just built a friend a computer for about $640 with an i5-2500k *with* a GPU. He already had a couple of things, though, like a case and optical drive.

$600 for what you need for an i5-2500K build is definitely not unreasonable.

If you're dead set on the parts you've got, though, then yes, they are compatible with each other. Not as fast as it could be for the price, but compatible.

Thanks, sound good :) 
I'll look into this build tonight then and see what I come up with.
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June 21, 2012 10:03:28 PM

Let me amend my previous post: It's not hard to do if you can get your components from Newegg. I understand if you're limited to Canada Computers, though.

I went and threw the components you had into a cart there (minus the motherboard, CPU, and PSU) and exchanged them for a Gigabyte LGA1155 B75 motherboard, the i5-2300 CPU, and the Corsair TX650W PSU, and I'm at $543.94 before tax ($614.65 after tax). That is a much stronger build for $50 more. I linked the components below.


http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=2...

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=3...

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...
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June 21, 2012 10:53:25 PM

I am considering doing this build, since my build is my design and probably wouldnt preform as good as an already tested build.

But one or two questions (or comments) first if any of you don't mind.

1) Why is this quad core 2.80ghz 6mb cache cpu better than this six core 3.30ghz 8mb cache cpu, or at least gaming-wise. Am I looking at the wrong 3 stats?

2) For the sake of long term upgradability, I would prefer to have two PCIE 16X's, instead of one PCIE 16X and one PCIE 16X (4X), because the 4X is half the speed of the 16X, if I am correct. If I had two 16X's I could crossfire two gpu's in the future, as I plan to do.
Anyways I wasn't aware PCIE ports was a limitation on a CPU or if it even is, but the specs on the i5-2300 say "# of PCI Express Ports - 1"
So I'm unsure if I want to upgrade the motherboard to get two 16X and have to upgrade the CPU as well to compensate, or what.
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June 21, 2012 11:00:05 PM

bavarians6 said:
I can't recommend the Corsair PSU's enough.

Corsair is a fantastic PSU brand, definitely, but their CX-V2 series is actually not as good as the CX-V1 series. They're no longer based on Seasonic S12 PSUs because they didn't want to move up to the more expensive S12IIs; the new CXs are based on an inferior DSA platform that offers less power than is actually advertised; what I mean is that the DSA platform offers up to a maximum of 500W, meaning the CX600 is not a real 600W power supply.

That said, let me see what I can put together for the OP:

CPU - Intel Core i5-2310 - $195
Mobo - ASUS P8Z68-V LX - $125
RAM - Mushkin Enhanced Silverline DDR3-1333 (2x4GB) - $49
HDD - Seagate Barracude 500GB 7200RPM - $80
PSU - PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk.III 600W - $88
Case - Antec One Mid-Tower - $60
Total - $597
Total w/ Rebates - $547

You could save a bit of money off this by finding a B75 motherboard (which lets you overclock your CPU and GPU, but not RAM), or getting a cheaper case (though the Antec One is very nice for that price). However, the only B75 board on NCIX which I could see as being any good would be the ASUS P8B75-V, which is only $13 off the P8Z68-V, and does not have a rebate. You could go with a mATX B75 board, and try to find a solid mATX case, like an InWin Dragon Slayer or an NZXT Vulcan.

Or, you could go the Pentium G route, which would be about on par with a Phenom II X4 955 (url=http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-fx-pentium-a...]according to Tom's[/url]), or get a Phenom II (960T or better) and an affordable 900-series board.

I think the mATX way might be pretty cool, an it'd likely also leave room for some extra case fans and a nice HSF.

Edit - To answer your questions, 1) the i5 performs better than the FX simply because it's got a significantly more efficient architecture; it's able to do more calculations per clock (known as IPC, or instructions per clock) than the FX's Bulldozer architecture. Not to mention, the i5 is a "true" quad-core in that it's got 4 physical, separate processing cores. The FX is a little strange - it's got 3 Bulldozer "modules," each of which contains two(ish) cores that share a significant amount of resources, causing each core to perform more slowly and reduces each of their individual IPCs.

2) As far as SLI/Crossfire is concerned, I'm not too knowledgeable on that, but if I recall correctly I don't think you'll be able to run each card in x16 mode regardless - it would be x8/x8, due to the CPU providing 16 lanes of PCIe 2.0 connectivity. Upgrading your processor won't help with this either, because most CPUs will only offer those same 16 lanes (albeit they're PCIe 3.0 with Ivy Bridge). But please don't take this as a proper answer, because I'm really just talking out of my ass on this one.
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June 21, 2012 11:06:57 PM

@ mousseng That's why I recommended the TX750W, which I think is still a Seasonic-based unit, but I don't recall. I don't recommend the CX series at all generally because most if not all are not Seasonic based.

And to the OP, I was just throwing stuff together real quick when I had a second. I agree with going with a motherboard with better crossfire support. Be warned though that the best you'll ever do as fast as x8/x16, etc. goes on an 1155-based board is x8/x8. This has effectively 0% impact on your gaming, though. The build @mousseng posted is a good one. The Z68 is technically an old motherboard, but it really is every bit as good as the new ones.

In general: don't skimp on the CPU, GPU, or PSU. For motherboards, get something that has the features you want (I recommend the B75 or Z77 boards for overclocking).
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June 21, 2012 11:22:17 PM

bavarians6 said:
@ mousseng That's why I recommended the TX750W, which I think is still a Seasonic-based unit, but I don't recall. I don't recommend the CX series at all generally because most if not all are not Seasonic based.

Yeah, I actually just checked, and I'm a bit confused by Corsair. Their new CX-V2 is based off of CWT's DSA... and their old TX-V1s are based off CWT's DSA. But yes, the new TXs are Seasonic units, which are fantastic. The PC Power and Cooling I listed is also a Seasonic unit (I'm not 100% sure which, though; I don't think it's an S12II despite being a silent PSU, because it's only got one 12V rail), and it's also purdy.

Quote:
And to the OP, I was just throwing stuff together real quick when I had a second. I agree with going with a motherboard with better crossfire support. Be warned though that the best you'll ever do as fast as x8/x16, etc. goes on an 1155-based board is x8/x8. This has effectively 0% impact on your gaming, though. The build @mousseng posted is a good one. The Z68 is technically an old motherboard, but it really is every bit as good as the new ones.

In general: don't skimp on the CPU, GPU, or PSU. For motherboards, get something that has the features you want (I recommend the B75 or Z77 boards for overclocking).

Good to know I got the bit about SLI/Xfire kind of right. As far as mobos go, B75, Z75, an Z77 are fantastic for OCing (not that you can do a whole lot with the CPU and RAM selected), but really the differences between them are small:

B75 can OC CPU + GPU. (CPU OCing is only possible through BCLK overclocking)
Z75 can OC CPU + GPU + RAM. Has Intel Rapid Storage Technology.
Z77 can OC CPU + GPU + RAM. Has Intel Rapid Storage Technology and Intel Smart Response Technology.

Apart from that, it's all port differences. Z68 is the predecessor to Z77, and lacks native USB3.0 support and PCIe 3.0.
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June 21, 2012 11:24:59 PM

This

I'll use this as the basis of my build if I'm to make any changes due to availability, and such.

It looks really safe, good consistant reviews on all the parts, love the case, and everything.

Going back to my unanswered question from before though:
Why is this quad core 2.80ghz 6mb cache cpu better (or more expensive) than this six core 3.30ghz 8mb cache cpu, or at least gaming-wise. Am I looking at the wrong 3 stats?

And lastly, I was saying I wanted two PCI Express 16X for future crossfiring, how neccecary or reasonable do you think that is? I would think spending the 100 bucks in the future to get the gpu I already have instead of 300 bucks to get an up to date gpu would be better. But you were saying the crossfiring a mobo was limited to would have zero effect on gaming?

And lastly, how upgradable is this build, and how good is the cpu for gaming, etc
Thanks.
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June 21, 2012 11:32:08 PM

Quote:
And lastly, I was saying I wanted two PCI Express 16X for future crossfiring, how neccecary or reasonable do you think that is? I would think spending the 100 bucks in the future to get the gpu I already have instead of 300 bucks to get an up to date gpu would be better. But you were saying the crossfiring a mobo was limited to would have zero effect on gaming?

It seems it's neither necessary nor reasonable - if you get a Z77 or Z75 motherboard that's got 2 PCIe 3.0 x8 slots, that is actually the equivalent of 2 PCIe 2.0 x16 slots (which your 3470, and most entry/mid-level video cards can't fully saturate). This means it will have no impact on gaming performance.
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June 21, 2012 11:38:43 PM

I don't plan on crossfiring 2 3470's, that card is just a placeholder while I let my summer job pay for a higher end gpu. Was that the reason you didn't recommend Xfiring? If not can you dumb down what you said before so I can better understand and explain it to my friend who is also building a computer? :/ 

Also I don't know if your build was assuming that I would be using the 3470, but say a graphics card that I get later on requires 500W, is the 600W PSU still enough? The CPU alone says it consumes 95W. Just something that needs clearing up for me.

Also again, for future reference, are there any compatability issues to consider when selecting a graphics card, will AMD ones work better than nVidea for this build, etc

Thanks
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June 22, 2012 1:08:38 AM

For the crossfire question: I don't see where @mousseng said not to do crossfire. All that was pointed out was that on the Intel 1155 platform, there are only enough PCIe lanes for graphics cards in crossfire or SLI to operate each card in x8 mode (this is where the notation x8/x8 comes from). This has a <1% impact on the performance of the cards (if that much).

As far as your question about the power supply goes, a good 500W power supply is powerful enough to run any current graphics card, with the possible exception of the AMD 7970/7950 or NVIDIA GTX 680/670. I recommend getting a bit bigger than you think you'll need (about ~650W+) so that down the line, if you want to add another card in crossfire with whatever one you get this summer, you won't have to upgrade your power supply. A 650W PSU can run anything with less power consumption than crossfire'd 6950's, which dissipate around 200W each.

There are no compatibility issues between any current graphics cards and any current consumer motherboard. It's a standard PCIe 2.0 or 3.0 slot. The 2.0 and 3.0 slots are cross-compatible (i.e. a PCIe 3.0 graphics card will work in a PCIe 2.0 slot and a PCIe 2.0 card will work in a PCIe 3.0 slot), so there are 0 compatibility issues.

I hope that answered all of your questions. Let me know if you're still confused on something.

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June 22, 2012 1:52:53 AM

+1 to everything Bavarian said. He pretty much nailed it on the head. The 600W PSU I listed is a very efficient power supply, though I wouldn't recommend using it to crossfire anything higher than a mid-level Radeon 7000-series video card or a mid-level GeForce 600-series video card (which haven't been released yet). The Radeon 7700 and 7800 cards are very efficient - at full load in Unigine Heaven, an overclocked Sapphire 7870 had a total system draw (meaning video card + the rest of the components) of 284W. So even if you added another 7870 to that system, a 600W (a good one, like the PP&C I listed) could still handle that.

Now, on the Crossfire/SLI bit, let me try to explain this as clearly as possible:

The video card does lots of calculations, like a CPU does. But there needs to be a pathway for it to send and receive results and calculations. This pathway is provided by the processor in the form of PCI Express lanes - 16 of them, to be specific. With the i5-2310 (and other Sandy Bridge CPUs), it's providing 16 lanes of PCI Express, Revision 2.0. Running a single video card off of a PCIe 2.0 x16 slot means that all 16 lanes of PCIe traffic are assigned to that one video card.

Now, when you've got two video cards (each in a full-size PCIe slot), while both of them would be physically able to make use of all 16 lanes (since they've got the proper amount of connectors), there's still only 16 lanes total to divide between them. So each card is allocated 8 lanes (designated as x8/x8). That means each of the video cards has 50% of the normal bandwidth (half the lanes) to send traffic across. This isn't an issue though, because although they CAN make use of all 16 lanes, they don't normally fill up all the lanes anyway.

Now, the only difference between PCIe 2.0 and PCIe 3.0 is PCIe 3.0's lanes are twice as wide - meaning each lane offers twice the bandwidth, so PCIe 3.0 x8 = PCIe 2.0 x16. The only way you can currently get PCIe 3.0 is by using a 3rd generation Core i processor - such as a Core i5-3450 - together with a 7-series Intel motherboard (B75, H77, Z75, Z77, etc.).

The reason the build I put together didn't include the i5-3450 and a 7-series motherboard was because it was simply too expensive (pre-rebate, at least). However, I will go back through and try to put something together as close to your price range as I can.

PS: I am physically incapable of being concise. Sorry, I just can't explain things well.

Edit - Here's a MicroATX build, within budget (barely), that can support SLI/CrossfireX for mid-range cards. If you spend a little extra and get a 700W+ PSU, it'll support any dual-GPU configuration that can fit in the case.

CPU - Intel Core i5-3450 - $200
Mobo - ASRock H77 Pro4-M - $106
RAM - Mushkin Enhanced Silverline DDR3-1333 (2x4GB) - $49
HDD - Seagate Barracude 500GB 7200RPM - $80
PSU - PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk.III 600W - $88
Case - NZXT Vulcan Mini Tower - $75
Total - $598
Total w/ Rebates - $573
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June 22, 2012 2:02:53 AM

Oh, ok that makes more sense actually. What threw me off was reading graphics card specs, the spec would read "550W Req" for say the GTX 680 (which I don't plan on getting lol) but in reality the card only takes up around 200W when in use.

And for the 1155 platform that makes sense to me as well after thinking about it.

mousseng you explained it perfectly, I like it better not concise, you learn more anyways.

Edit: answer to the question was already posted :p 
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June 22, 2012 2:10:05 AM

Czaran said:
Oh, ok that makes more sense actually. What threw me off was reading graphics card specs, the spec would read "550W Req" for say the GTX 680 (which I don't plan on getting lol) but in reality the card only takes up around 200W when in use.

Right, the "recommended wattage" is taking in account for bad PSUs and other components. It's always an overestimate to avoid liability.

Quote:
And for the 1155 platform that makes sense to me as well after thinking about it.
So is 1155 the current technology? Is there even a way to crossfire 2 video cards at 16X each?
If not isn't that kind of pointless, what is the point of crossfiring?

LGA1155 and LGA2011 are the two latest CPU platforms to come from Intel, whereas AM3/AM3+ is the latest from AMD.
As far as I know, there isn't any way to do a x16/x16 Crossfire (not on LGA1155, at least) - but the thing is, most modern cards can't fully make use of all 16 PCIe 2.0 lanes. There will likely be a bit of a choke with running on PCIe 2.0 x8, this is where PCIe 3.0 (and that last build I posted) comes in.

PCIe 3.0 has twice as much bandwidth as PCIe 2.0, so running a Crossfire setup in a x8/x8 PCIe 3.0 setup is effectively the same as running in a theoretical x16/x16 PCIe 2.0 setup.

The point of Crossfiring is to give a big boost to your gaming performance without doling out the extra cash for an equivalent single-card setup. Say, for example, I buy a budget gaming rig that's powered by a Radeon HD 7770 - a $150 entry-level card. Maybe 5 months down the road, I've got some extra cash and want to upgrade that, but instead of spending $300+ on a GTX 570, why don't I just spend $150 on another 7770 and Crossfire them? It'll put me at the same level of performance as the 570 would have, except I've spent a total of $300 on video cards instead of $450.
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June 22, 2012 2:19:33 AM

Thanks so much, I have a much better understanding of it now :) 

I'll stick to this build so I don't go over budget. Maybe in 4 or so years I can upgrade the motherboard and cpu to something more up to standard and build a up to date gaming computer then.

And this:

Quote:
I buy a budget gaming rig that's powered by a Radeon HD 7770 - a $150 entry-level card. Maybe 5 months down the road, I've got some extra cash and want to upgrade that, but instead of spending $300+ on a GTX 570, why don't I just spend $150 on another 7770 and Crossfire them? It'll put me at the same level of performance as the 570 would have, except I've spent a total of $300 on video cards instead of $450."


is implying you have the correct cpu and motherboard with 2 x 3.0 PCIe 16X slots, right?
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June 22, 2012 2:19:44 AM

@mousseng Right on.

Now, Intel's 2011 platform has something like 40 total PCIe lanes. That's where you can do things like triple and quadruple crossfire for those so inclined. The 1155 is limited to either 16 or 20; I forget which. I think it's 20.

There are benchmarks all over the place that show that moving from PCIe 2.0 x16 down to x8 makes extraordinarily little difference in the performance of the card. So, dual crossfire at x8/x8 is perfectly fine. That's what I'm running now, in fact.

DISCLAIMER: The following is NOT a suggestion you should switch to AMD.

For AMD platforms, the AM3/AM3+ boards all have 32+ lanes available, so doing x16/x16 is possible on AMD. However, like I said, this makes such a minute amount of difference that the gains you get by going the Intel route far outweighs any advantages of x16/x16 vs. x8/x8. So, don't go AMD just because you get more lanes. It makes no sense to do so.
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June 22, 2012 2:30:58 AM

Czaran said:
Thanks so much, I have a much better understanding of it now :) 

No prob. I just hope my understanding (and consequently yours) aren't misinformed. c:

Quote:
is implying you have the correct cpu and motherboard with 2 x 3.0 PCIe 16X slots, right?

Not necessarily. Theoretically, you can install a full-length, "16-lane" card into a half- or quarter-length PCIe slot (as long as the end of the slot isn't closed) and have the extra connectors just hanging out. But, for simplicity's sake (and my personal preferences), yes, I would have two 16-lane slots in that case. PCIe 2.0 or 3.0 won't make a huge difference in that case, though, being they're low-end cards.

But yeah, the mid-tower ATX build is a bit more in-budget than the mini-tower mATX build, so it's totally up to you. The thing with the mid-tower build you should know, though, is this:

It can support quad-Crossfire (really, it can). However: It has two PCIe 2.0 x16 lanes, but only one of them functions as an x16 lane - the other runs at a maximum of x4. This will still not make a huge impact on Crossfire performance. You will still achieve much higher graphical fidelity with that extra video card, even if both are running at lower bandwidth (although if what Bavarians said is true, it may run at either x16/x4 or x8/x4 - still, it will be fine).
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June 22, 2012 2:32:10 AM

Edit: Question already answered.

Oh actually mousseng I didn't see your post about the microATX build.

CPU - Intel Core i5-3450 - $200
Mobo - ASRock H77 Pro4-M - $106
RAM - Mushkin Enhanced Silverline DDR3-1333 (2x4GB) - $49
HDD - Seagate Barracude 500GB 7200RPM - $80
PSU - PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk.III 600W - $88
Case - NZXT Vulcan Mini Tower - $75
Total - $598
Total w/ Rebates - $573

Actually looks awesome, case can fit full size high end gpu's (GTX 680 is 9inch, case supports 13.7inch) and tri?-crossfire them, as I can gather. Also the i5-3450 is perfect, very usable longish term.
What are the downsides of this build? I imagine I'm saving a bit of money because of the size downgrade from ATX to mATX but this seems really, really good, exactly what I need, nice bit of mobility too.

Oh btw the PSU is ATX, can ATX PSUs fit in a mATX case or was that just a mistake on your end :p 
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June 22, 2012 5:46:44 AM

Czaran said:
Actually looks awesome, case can fit full size high end gpu's (GTX 680 is 9inch, case supports 13.7inch) and tri?-crossfire them, as I can gather. Also the i5-3450 is perfect, very usable longish term.

Yeah, it'll easily be able to fit reference cards and most custom cards; NZXT had gaming in mind with this case.

Quote:
What are the downsides of this build? I imagine I'm saving a bit of money because of the size downgrade from ATX to mATX but this seems really, really good, exactly what I need, nice bit of mobility too.

The downsides are that it's a mATX build. The motherboard, while still having a ton of features packed in, still has fewer ports available for it, has less room for add-in cards, and has a pretty small voltage regulator. The case, while roomy for a mATX case, is still lacking internal expandability, it'll likely get hotter, and only supports about 4 fans total. I mean, apart from all that I can't really see much downside to it as opposed to the mid-tower.

Quote:
Oh btw the PSU is ATX, can ATX PSUs fit in a mATX case or was that just a mistake on your end :p 

Nah, it's called Micro ATX because it still conforms to ATX standards, it's just smaller. The PSU is still good for it.
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June 22, 2012 2:35:16 PM

Oh alright. I think I might be considering this then. My only problem would be getting the parts in, it seems like a delicate thing even in an ATX case. For a first timer, how challenging would this be?

Other than that, I would probably have to hunt down a new case because that case seems pretty unavailable in Canada :p 
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June 22, 2012 2:52:51 PM

Czaran said:
Oh alright. I think I might be considering this then. My only problem would be getting the parts in, it seems like a delicate thing even in an ATX case. For a first timer, how challenging would this be?

Other than that, I would probably have to hunt down a new case because that case seems pretty unavailable in Canada :p 


Well, if you went with this:

mousseng said:

That said, let me see what I can put together for the OP:

Case - Antec One Mid-Tower - $60



Just pick the case up from Canada Computers - they've got it for $54.99 with a $10 instant rebate plus a $10 MIR - $34.99 - and currently ALL locations aside from their Montreal Laval location have at least 1 in stock - I was looking at this case earlier this for an upcoming build later this summer, and stock numbers have increased since then. :) 

http://canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=6_112...
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June 22, 2012 3:22:12 PM

Actually that case looks pretty decent, peopl
e say its sturdy, not great, but good, which is what I'm buying with a budget build. Plus its in stock where I live.



My complaint would be I don't see a dock for the power supply at the top, and given the size of ATX power supplies I would probably put it in last. That kinda makes me nervous for my other parts...but I'm inexperienced so I really don't know.

I might be better off getting an ATX case even though I have an mATX mobo, as suggested, just for ease of installation and future use if I ever replace that mobo :p 

I'm unsure how to install the mobo on this case though, I am am correct it should go in the top left, with the PSU being on the bottom left...
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June 22, 2012 3:51:33 PM

Czaran said:
I'm unsure how to install the mobo on this case though, I am am correct it should go in the top left, with the PSU being on the bottom left...

Right. It'll go in just like a regular ATX motherboard would, only you'll be missing the bottom portion of the board, so you'll likely only have to deal with 6 mounting points instead of about 9. Power supply goes where you say, right on top of the dust filter.
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June 22, 2012 3:51:59 PM

Czaran said:
Actually that case looks pretty decent, peopl
e say its sturdy, not great, but good, which is what I'm buying with a budget build. Plus its in stock where I live.

My complaint would be I don't see a dock for the power supply at the top, and given the size of ATX power supplies I would probably put it in last. That kinda makes me nervous for my other parts...but I'm inexperienced so I really don't know.

I might be better off getting an ATX case even though I have an mATX mobo, as suggested, just for ease of installation and future use if I ever replace that mobo :p 

I'm unsure how to install the mobo on this case though, I am am correct it should go in the top left, with the PSU being on the bottom left...


I'm not sure if you were confused on the case being ATX or not, but it is. And yes, the PSU goes on the bottom of the case (any Antec case I've seen comes this way - I've got a Nine Hundred right now, and I am rather hesitant to switch to a top-spot PSU case).

Before you make any decision, whether to jump-ship to another case or to get this one and tackle it blindly, take a look at the manual here http://www.antec.com/pdf/manuals/One_Manual_EN.pdf - page 10 & page 11 will outline the mobo & PSU briefly for you. I just had my Nine Hundred apart over the weekend to replace the heatsink and removed the mobo twice, once while removing my GPU as well. You *can* put the PSU in last if you want - but if you have a smaller board, you should have plenty of space to move around if it's in first.

Like when I upgraded my heatsink this weekend - go through the motions of what you're going to do first, if you're at all hesitant. The PSU sitting on the bottom of the case is great for that - it's not going to go anywhere, and you can easily put the mobo in and take it out as you see fit *before* any screws or other bits are put in place. If you're more comfortable putting the mobo and everything else in before the PSU, then do it that way.
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June 23, 2012 5:11:21 PM

Alright so after some thought (or not much at all) I decided to stay on the ATX route because it generally seems just easier, for upgradability and ease of installation.

I know it seems like I jump ship a lot and change my mind constantly based on what other people tell me and, well, I do :p  Lets just say I'm easily convinced.

Quote:
Power Supply (Silencer Mk III Series 600W 80PLUS Bronze High Performance Power Supply)
= $90 (Canada Computers In Stock)

Motherboard (Asus P8Z77-V LX Socket 1155 ATX)
= $135 (Canada Computers In Stock)

CPU (Intel Core i5-3450 Quad-Core Socket 1155, 3.1Ghz, 6MB)
= $190 (Canada Computers In Stock)

RAM (Mushkin Enhanced Silverline DDR3-1333 (2x4GB)
= $45 (Canada Computers In Stock)

Case (Antec ONE Gaming Series Mid-ATX Case)
= $35 (Canada Computers In Stock)

HDD (SATA3 6.0Gb/s 500GB 16MB Cache Seagate)
= $80 (Canada Computers In Stock)

All of the above include rebates

(Canada Computers)
Subtotal = $575.8
Total (+tax) = $649.7


With this build, all the parts are in stock where I live (however reliable those numbers are)
Overbudget, but my budget was more of a guideline anyways. I'm not supporting a family or anything, I'm just a kid.
Also I switched mobos to the P8Z77-V, it might be a bit overkill with the 2 x PCIE 3.0. Maybe I'm being too persistant with the whole crossfiring thing as it might not actually even be neccecary, I'm just reluctant to give it up for some reason.
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June 23, 2012 5:13:03 PM

Czaran said:
Alright so after some thought (or not much at all) I decided to stay on the ATX route because it generally seems just easier, for upgradability and ease of installation.

I know it seems like I jump ship a lot and change my mind constantly based on what other people tell me and, well, I do :p  Lets just say I'm easily convinced.

Current build on google docs

Overbudget, but my budget was more of a guideline anyways. I'm not supporting a family or anything, I'm just a kid.
Also I switched mobos to the P8Z77-V, it might be a bit overkill with the 2 x PCIE 3.0. Maybe I'm being too persistant with the whole crossfiring thing as it might not actually even be neccecary, I'm just reluctant to give it up for some reason.


your Google Docs link goes to a new document for me :p 
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June 23, 2012 5:17:03 PM

Yeah that didn't work.
Edited :p 
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June 23, 2012 5:30:37 PM

looks good for the parts you still need to pickup, especially when you're limited to canada computers for pickup! if you want to secure the items for your local store, you might wanna place pick up orders now. they'll e-mail you (and likely call you as well) from the store once they have confirmed they've got all your stuff at the cash.
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June 23, 2012 5:54:08 PM

Czaran said:
I know it seems like I jump ship a lot and change my mind constantly based on what other people tell me and, well, I do :p  Lets just say I'm easily convinced.

There's also a lot to consider when assembling a computer, so that's really not that uncommon.

Quote:
With this build, all the parts are in stock where I live (however reliable those numbers are)
Overbudget, but my budget was more of a guideline anyways. I'm not supporting a family or anything, I'm just a kid.

You may want to give them a call ahead of time if you don't plan on ordering right away, either. Make sure they actually do have them. But overall, I really like that setup - you done good.
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June 23, 2012 10:09:20 PM

Thanks :p 

Alright I guess thats it, thanks for all the advice and help, its been fun :) 
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!