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Need help choosing a PSU

Hello i'm a new builder and i recent built a computer i planned upon using primarily for gaming and come to fine out that my PSU is simply not strong enough to support my computer without causing heat issues.

I have an M5A 78L-M LX Mobo

And a Nvidia Geforce GTX 550 TI

AMD FX 6100 Six-Core Processor.

I'm just looking for advice on what PSU i should put in it.

EDIT: Ok i found one on sale and it seems compatable http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00596NFOI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=A3SA3I47FHXAYS

If someone could tell me if the will get the job done it would be much appreciated.
20 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about need choosing
  1. A1h1altion said:
    Hello i'm a new builder and i recent built a computer i planned upon using primarily for gaming and come to fine out that my PSU is simply not strong enough to support my computer without causing heat issues.

    I have an M5A 78L-M LX Mobo

    And a Nvidia Geforce GTX 550 TI

    AMD FX 6100 Six-Core Processor.

    I'm just looking for advice on what PSU i should put in it.


    What's your budget?

    Tom
  2. Anything i just a part that will work for my PC, however i would rather not be excessive.
  3. A1h1altion said:
    Anything i just a part that will work for my PC, however i would rather not be excessive.



    OK - what else do you have? hdd, fans, optical drives, etc.
    and do you plan on multiple gpu's down the road -as CF/SLI
    require more power. Oh, what PSU do you now have?

    Tom

    and where are you located?
  4. A1h1altion said:
    Hello i'm a new builder and i recent built a computer i planned upon using primarily for gaming and come to fine out that my PSU is simply not strong enough to support my computer without causing heat issues.

    I have an M5A 78L-M LX Mobo

    And a Nvidia Geforce GTX 550 TI

    AMD FX 6100 Six-Core Processor.

    I'm just looking for advice on what PSU i should put in it.

    EDIT: Ok i found one on sale and it seems compatable http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00596NFOI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=A3SA3I47FHXAYS

    If someone could tell me if the will get the job done it would be much appreciated.



    Hi again - stay away from Kentek & unless you are going to go miltiple GPU's you don't need anywhere near 800w.

    Tom
  5. My my experience with PSU and I'm sure other people would agree. Skimping on the PSU is not something to do, when I first started building I bought PSU's that were about 30-40 bucks and they fried most components on startup. I would pick something from a Corsair, Seasonic, Antec etc. Anywhere from 500-600 would be sufficient enough for your build.

    Here are some to choose from:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151119
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341050
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341022

    Just a few to choose from. Good luck!
  6. I may add multiple GPU's down the road(although way down the road) thanks for the advice on KENTEK, what brand would you recommend, as well as what Wattage do you recommend.

    And as for adding multiple GPU's that's a maybe but for now im just worried about what PSU my PC needs to run in its current state.
  7. A1h1altion said:
    I may add multiple GPU's down the road(although way down the road) thanks for the advice on KENTEK, what brand would you recommend, as well as what Wattage do you recommend.

    And as for adding multiple GPU's that's a maybe but for now im just worried about what PSU my PC needs to run in its current state.


    actually abCasPeRR hit the nail on the head with wattage and brands; Seasonic, Corsair, Antec, & add XFX, Enermax, Rosewill.

    Some to consider:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371030

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151093

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182199

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371016

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182131

    Tom
  8. A1h1altion said:
    Hello i'm a new builder and i recent built a computer i planned upon using primarily for gaming and come to fine out that my PSU is simply not strong enough to support my computer without causing heat issues.

    I have an M5A 78L-M LX Mobo

    And a Nvidia Geforce GTX 550 TI

    AMD FX 6100 Six-Core Processor.

    I'm just looking for advice on what PSU i should put in it.

    EDIT: Ok i found one on sale and it seems compatable http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00596NFOI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=A3SA3I47FHXAYS

    If someone could tell me if the will get the job done it would be much appreciated.



    A PSU that's "just big enough" is one of the worst things you can do to a computer. I just invested in a Seasonic 1050W Gold and am glad I did.
  9. ram1009 said:
    A PSU that's "just big enough" is one of the worst things you can do to a computer. I just invested in a Seasonic 1050W Gold and am glad I did.


    Thats absolutely correct, but I bought a Corsair Gaming series 800w, which is way more than I need. For his system he doesnt need 1000w.
  10. Nobody *needs* 1000Ws. That doesn't mean it isn't a good investment. The smaller the PSU the harder it works. If 800W is the biggest you can afford then at least you're smart enough to go that far. Personally, I would have bought the Seasonic 1250W if I felt I could afford it.
  11. ram1009 said:
    Nobody *needs* 1000Ws. That doesn't mean it isn't a good investment. The smaller the PSU the harder it works. If 800W is the biggest you can afford then at least you're smart enough to go that far. Personally, I would have bought the Seasonic 1250W if I felt I could afford it.

    Still overkill. Most PSUs hit maximum efficiency around 50% - 60% load. And most have horrible efficiency under 40% load. A 1000W PSU that's only supplying 300W is actually under worse "stress" than a 500W in the same situation.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong running a PSU at 70% - 85% load. It doesn't put extra wear or stress on the PSU.

    Another option, it seems Newegg has a sale on Antec 650W units today, only $65.
  12. ram1009 said:
    Nobody *needs* 1000Ws. That doesn't mean it isn't a good investment. The smaller the PSU the harder it works. If 800W is the biggest you can afford then at least you're smart enough to go that far. Personally, I would have bought the Seasonic 1250W if I felt I could afford it.


    wrong.

    A PSU is designed for what it's rated for. They can never run "hard" because these are designed to run with a certain output in mind. A normal power supply is most efficient when its under the 40-60% load which for a standard 500-550w unit is about 200-300w on the 12v rail. This is more than enough to power a decent computer with most discrete graphic cards. To use a 1000w power supply means that a computer will run at under 10% load while not doing anything and only a mere ~20-30% when in use In that low load area, psu's are usually the most inefficient and hence why 500-550w units are usually recommended. As anything over that range is overkill and usually a waste of money.
  13. Best answer
    I think some of you are blowing this out of proportion.
    This is what the poster asked:

    And as for adding multiple GPU's that's a maybe but for now im just worried about what PSU my PC needs to run in its current state.

    In addition to what he listed, assume 2 hdd, 1 dvd/cd rw drive, 2 sticks of ram, and 3 led fans his
    system will draw 375w max.

    So, 520-550w gives A1h1altion what he is asking for with some headroom.

    Tom
  14. Best answer selected by A1h1altion.
  15. Alright i got what i need thanks everyone who posted you made my life as a new builder much easier.
  16. lilotimz said:
    wrong.

    A PSU is designed for what it's rated for. They can never run "hard" because these are designed to run with a certain output in mind. A normal power supply is most efficient when its under the 40-60% load which for a standard 500-550w unit is about 200-300w on the 12v rail. This is more than enough to power a decent computer with most discrete graphic cards. To use a 1000w power supply means that a computer will run at under 10% load while not doing anything and only a mere ~20-30% when in use In that low load area, psu's are usually the most inefficient and hence why 500-550w units are usually recommended. As anything over that range is overkill and usually a waste of money.



    Sorry but your ignorance is showing. Your math isn't great either.
  17. ram1009 said:
    Sorry but your ignorance is showing. Your math isn't great either.

    Care to back that up with more than "Because I say so."?
  18. RedJaron said:
    Care to back that up with more than "Because I say so."?



    Believe what you choose. I specify power supplies in my work daily. I've never had one fail. My critic speaks only of conversion factor efficiency or how much energy is wasted during the process of converting AC to DC. This is not of significant importance to me. The extra $10-$20 per year spent on power is worth the peace of mind that I am not over stressing the electrical components in my PSU. My recommendations for oversize PSUs are always as "insurance policies". That's how I think of it in my own computers. If you know anything about electronic components you're aware that stressing them shortens their life. It's like running your car in first gear all the time. It works fine just not as long. There aren't many items in any electronic project that can be so readily over designed. Why not take advantage of this one? Like many choices in life, you'll have to live with it long after you forget what it cost.
  19. So in other words, no you can't.
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