Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Future proofed 2k gaming pc

Last response: in Systems
Share
June 22, 2012 7:11:53 AM

Hey this is my first time building my own system. I've got a $2000 budget for this, and I am aiming for something that will last the next 2 years and only need slight upgrading rather than a whole new PC to stay up-to-date with the new future games with max graphics and performance.

Purchase date: within the next month, sooner the better.
Budget range: 1800-2100
In Australia, don't have preferred sites, willing to order online. Do trust umart and computer alliance if you are familiar.
Won't be overclocking
Also I may look at SLI 680's in a couple years time when it's time for an upgrade. I don't want to have to replace my whole computer then, just a part or two if possible.


CPU - Intel S1155 Core i7 3770 3.40Ghz Quad Core CPU
Motherboard - Gigabyte S2011 ATX GA-X79-UD3
RAM - DDR3 8GB (2x4G) Geil 1750Mhz RAM Kit
HDD - 2TB Seagate 3.5" 5900rpm SATA 6Gb/s HDD
SSD - 120GB OCZ 2.5" Agility 3 SATA 6Gb/s SSD Drive
GPU - NVIDIA GTX680 2GB Gigabyte PCIe
Case - CoolerMaster Storm Enforcer Case
PSU - 700 Watt Thermaltake Litepower
Disc drive - Blu-Ray combo LG 12xBD-R/16xSATA Drive

I am re-using 2x24 inch monitors 1920x1080 resolutions + keyboard/mouse/5.1 speakers with sub and a 1tb hdd

More about : future proofed gaming

June 22, 2012 8:38:11 AM

Some problems.

CPU is fine, though it is overkill for gaming.

Mobo is good.

RAM. Have never heard of Geil and 1750Mhz (do they even make them at this speed?) is pointless. Get a G.Skill or Corsair Vengeance RAM kit at 1600Mhz and 1.5V. You will want 16GB if your video editing or want super future proofing.

HDD: No point for green drives, get a proper 7200RPM drive. 5900RPM drives are slower and don't offer significant enough power savings to warrant the performance decrease.

SSD: Agility isnt OCZ's top of the line SSD. You will want a Vertex 4.

GPU: Very powerful, though to save some cash you could get a 670 and overclock it past 680 performance. Easy $100 savings.

Case is good.

PSU: You will want 750W if considering dual SLI, and not from Thermaltake either. This is a good power supply that pretty cheap as well. Fully modular, 80+ silver and good reviews around the internet.
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...

Note: PC Case Gear is a good place to get components from.

Optical: Meh, its fine.
m
0
l
June 22, 2012 12:08:36 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/au/p/aCgd

heres a better build. it is overclocking ready, SLI ready (id recommend getting the GPUs now since in the future, they will be very very hard to find), and has a pretty good SSD for a reasonable price.

honestly, a 670 will perform very close to a 680 (5-8%) while being 100 dollars less.

you must overclock. if you dont, it usually causes bottlenecks from the CPU. in order to eliminate bottlenecks you overclock. overclocking can also add futureproofing

to overclock, i added a motherboard that is extremely easy to overclock. all you have to do is press the OC Genie button on the motherboard and it will determine how much it is going to overclock. it usually gets you around 4.2-4.3ghz all by pressing a button. of course it is not perfect so you will have to run a stress test for about 24hrs on the CPu. i use prime95 to do this
m
0
l
Related resources
June 22, 2012 12:13:08 PM

nothing is future proof just saying. this system wont be able to run games at max settings even SLI in about 5 years
m
0
l
June 25, 2012 10:51:49 AM

Thanks for the advice everyone, sorry I haven't been able to look back at this, been busy with work since posting.

So is it really worth it for a complete beginner to attempt overclocking his soon to be bought computer, instead of paying an extra hundred or so and not overclocking?

I just worry about pushing too far or doing something wrong and screwing up my lovely new expensive pc.
m
0
l

Best solution

June 25, 2012 12:00:35 PM

When it comes to overclocking, there is the risk of pushing your hardware too far and damaging/ shortening the lifespan of the component, but a conservative overclock wont have any adverse affects. I would define a conservative overclock is anything where you dont have to up the voltage to keep it stable.

On an i5-3570k (which you should be getting on a gaming rig), that is around 4.3 - 4.4Ghz. That wont kick up temps too high and no voltage settings have to be changed. Basic aftermarket coolers (never trust stock) should easily be able to keep that cool. To change the clock speed on the CPU, search around in the BIOS for a CPU multiplier (should be 34) and a BaseClock (should be 1000mhz). Multiplier x Base clock = Frequency. Stock frequency is 3400Mhz, so 34 X 1000Mhz = 3400Mhz. Just in case you dont know, 1000Mhz = 1Ghz.

Set the multiplier to 40, boot to windows, use a program called Prime95 to stress the CPU and another called CoreTemp to monitor the CPU's temperature. If your satisfied with what your seeing, back into BIOS and up the multiplier to 41, rinse and repeat. Dont go above 4.3Ghz as then you might start having stability issues.

On GPU's it depends on the model how far you can get, but the general method is to get a program called MSI Afterburner and another called Furmark. Then slowly bump up the Core and Memory clock until its unstable, then back down a bit. This video will explain what you basically have to do. Use Afterburner while Furmark is running to make sure the GPU doesn't get too hot (I'd say no hotter than 75Degrees, same with the CPU)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA_l5-HDel4&feature=plcp

Make sure to run 3D Mark11 before and after overclocking, that way you can see a literal number telling you the performance increase, I got my score from ~6400 to 7360 by overclocking my card (though I did mess with the voltage to get higher clocks)

Yes, I definetly suggest overclocking your components, it more performance for free.
Share
June 25, 2012 12:06:36 PM

for the msi z77a-gd65, all you have to do to reach 4.2 ghz is to just press the oc genie button on the motherboard. it takes care of the rest
m
0
l
June 25, 2012 1:32:24 PM

Surprised no one mentioned this yet, but your motherboard is X79 and is intended to house LGA 2011 processors. You should be getting a Z77 motherboard with a i7-3770k which is a LGA 1155 processor.
m
0
l
June 25, 2012 2:09:13 PM

Indeed, your motherboard isn't compatible with your CPU.
And why aren't you getting an i7 3770K, so you can overclock your CPU, and get more out of it?
m
0
l
June 25, 2012 2:12:26 PM

sadly, some people never heard of overclocking and when they do, they only hear about how overclocking can damage your system or burn up
m
0
l
June 25, 2012 3:20:17 PM

welshmin said:
Hey this is my first time building my own system. I've got a $2000 budget for this, and I am aiming for something that will last the next 2 years and only need slight upgrading rather than a whole new PC to stay up-to-date with the new future games with max graphics and performance.

Purchase date: within the next month, sooner the better.
Budget range: 1800-2100
In Australia, don't have preferred sites, willing to order online. Do trust umart and computer alliance if you are familiar.
Won't be overclocking
Also I may look at SLI 680's in a couple years time when it's time for an upgrade. I don't want to have to replace my whole computer then, just a part or two if possible.


CPU - Intel S1155 Core i7 3770 3.40Ghz Quad Core CPU
Motherboard - Gigabyte S2011 ATX GA-X79-UD3
RAM - DDR3 8GB (2x4G) Geil 1750Mhz RAM Kit
HDD - 2TB Seagate 3.5" 5900rpm SATA 6Gb/s HDD
SSD - 120GB OCZ 2.5" Agility 3 SATA 6Gb/s SSD Drive
GPU - NVIDIA GTX680 2GB Gigabyte PCIe
Case - CoolerMaster Storm Enforcer Case
PSU - 700 Watt Thermaltake Litepower
Disc drive - Blu-Ray combo LG 12xBD-R/16xSATA Drive

I am re-using 2x24 inch monitors 1920x1080 resolutions + keyboard/mouse/5.1 speakers with sub and a 1tb hdd


You need a 1155 motherboard (Z77, Z68) to run that CPU; you listed a 2011 socket motherboard.
m
0
l
June 29, 2012 11:13:50 PM

Best answer selected by welshmin.
m
0
l
June 29, 2012 11:14:14 PM

Alright, i'll be giving overclocking a go then.

Thank you everybody for the info and assistance, I think i've got my choices ready then.
m
0
l
!