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Plan now to save later.

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June 22, 2012 11:13:15 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: Buying parts over time. No known finish date.

Budget Range: Cheaper, but better

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming(mostly offline), Movies, Surfing the internet, maybe some editing, using as a server for the movies and such for other devices

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse. (monitor not required but suggestions welcome.)

Country: will be finished in Sweden (if I'm ever done)

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU and Nvidia graphics

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Yes SLI

Monitor Resolution: Higher the better

Additional Comments: Id like a quieter system for the movies but with less load a fan controller can do that.



As i am building this thing piece by piece over time, I don't really have to hurry on finding parts now. I would like input by knowledgeable people. I have picked out a few things i like but not sure how well everything would work together.

For cases I like the Cooler Master Cosmos 2
and the Cooler Master HAF X

and for the mobo i was thinking the EVGA SR-2
or the EVGA SR-X

I was also thinking of having a single SSD for the OSs (Windows Linux dual boot) and standard programs (Firefox, VLC, Daemon tool, etc) with multiple others for the various data and files.

I'd like to have this thing up and running as fast as possible, but it will still take a while.

Thanks for the help I'm sure is to come

More about : plan save

June 22, 2012 11:53:56 AM

holy cow. what are you planning to do with a dual cpu machine? those builds cost over 5000 dollars and you are just watching movies?????

this might suit you better. i have no idea about your budget

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aCfa

you can easily SLI in the future. plus the haf xm is the same thing as the haf x but smaller
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June 22, 2012 12:06:03 PM

I don't really have a set budget, as it all will be bought here and there. I'm sure some items will drop in price and new ones will come out by the time I'm done. and i know its over 5000 can push it close to 6 or 7k with the highest cpus and graphics. which a prebuilt with all the highest stuff is up there with it.

I chose something with a lot of power and ram and ability to add so much stuff because i have no idea what ill be doing with it later. And how much later gen stuff may need. And I'm kinda fond of the larger cases, unless they get too noisy. They offer more room for extra drives and larger motherboards.

I'm trying to find different things so that i can get it done now. which i like your suggestions, but i also want to have it ready for upgrading later.

id like to be able to run at least the games now and for next gen(next years?) as good as i can.

I do thank you for you response and will look at that some more.
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June 22, 2012 12:12:25 PM

you will never need that much power. my system that i set up for can already run games at max settings on 1080p. it can overclock and has room to grow in. if you think you need to video edit in the future, add more memory of the same brand and use a i7 3770k. if you plan on running more than 2 gpus in the future, get a p8z77-ws motherboard. even so at my stock configuration it is more than enough for anything

you never need 2 CPUs with24 threads in total just to run games. games cant even use 4 threads.

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June 22, 2012 12:21:13 PM

unlesss your doing high end video or cad a one core i7 going to have all the power a home gaming machine needs. if you get into high end editing your better off going with a server board and cpu and high end gpu. i get a 256g ssd and two 670 and sli them. 16g of ram and a 2-4tb hard drive and h100 cpu cooler. just make sure the z77 mb the pci lanes are 16x for one card and 8x for two.
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June 22, 2012 12:22:43 PM

Yea I'm sure id never need that much power. I think i would go straight to the better stuff. so the P8z77-ws with the I7 3770k. i had planed on running 2 sets of quad sli at some point one set to one display and one to another. like 2x gtx590 and 2x gtx690. though not sure if that works. and would that processor be able to keep up with me playing games and sharing content off of it to the other devices on the network at the same time?
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June 22, 2012 1:01:55 PM

Well screw the quad sli cost too much right now.

I still wonder about if the processor could keep up with all i do. I know its fast and all though.

besides that how does this look http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aClj


also any ideas on monitors I would like a multi-screen set up. though sometimes it just doesn't look right to me. Is there a real improvement in game play. the way the game feels anyway. and as far as i know unless its reading it as one screen its only racing games that work.
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June 22, 2012 2:44:50 PM

it looks messed up. the cosmos 2 has waaaay more than enough space for a atx motherboard, the motherboard you kinda cheaped out on, the power supply is too much, the hard drives you can get better.

just go with this one. its the same on i did before but i modifed some specs


http://pcpartpicker.com/au/p/aCgd

you can add more graphics cards, but then you will need the 1000w model

multi-monitor have much benefits other than making your game run slower due to the extra pixels. the only reason you will need multi-monitor is when you are playing a lot of racing games (dirt 3)

there is no point of the WS board if you do not add ore than 2 video cards. the processor will keep up with anything currently out there.
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June 22, 2012 2:45:56 PM

also, i have yet to see someone use more than one optical drive.
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June 22, 2012 3:38:10 PM

I know the cosmos 2 has way more space than I need. I like it for the looks, airflow, and the space for upgrading to a bigger mobo if i need to. I am planning on doing at least dual GPU. I'm trying to get as close to the top as I can with this one. No need to skimp on parts if something else is enough better.

I'll skip the mulit-monitor for now then I don't plan on any racing games.

The power supply I'm getting big for upgrading reasons as well. as far as i know it wont hurt.

I'd also like to get liquid cooling for it, but I haven't found any i like yet.

as for multiple optical it's from the old days of using one to read while the other burns. no need to make disc images.
and I'm trying to work blue-ray into it.

I did do a few changes after reading some more stuff. a few weeks ago i would have been lost.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aCEE
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June 22, 2012 3:46:59 PM

telling you right now. the cosmos 2 weighs 50 empty.

asrock extreme6 only supports 2 gpus. get ws board if you want more

1000w from xfx is more than enough for 3 gpus and overclocking


custom water cooling isnt fit for the cosmos 2. you are better off a h100 instead. if you plan to do custom water cooling, id suggest you get the silverstone tj11b
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June 22, 2012 3:59:50 PM

I know how big it is. Ive been looking at this and the HAF X for about a month. Is there another case up in that size you would recommend that would have better water cooling capabilities?

ok so i got the mobo changed to http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-motherboard-p8z77ws
or is there a better one?

ok running 4 way SLI with water cooling and everything else 1000w would be enough?

and by liquid cooling i meant water or other liquid like such, not nitrogen. and at most i wouldnt overclock but to around 4ghz.
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June 22, 2012 4:19:18 PM

For OC to 4Ghz you dont need water cooling. The hyper 121 evo or the Noctua NH-U12P SE2 will cover that easily.
And drop the second GTX670 if you're only going to use one screen. One 670 will max anything out there on 1 monitor setup, you can always add another after a year or so. It will be cheaper then.
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June 22, 2012 4:20:18 PM

taterhead114 said:
I know how big it is. Ive been looking at this and the HAF X for about a month. Is there another case up in that size you would recommend that would have better water cooling capabilities?

Actually, yes. The Rosewill Blackhawk Ultra (read about it here) would be better. Not only that, it's big enough to accept that silly dual-socket motherboard you had picked out earlier, which I don't believe the Cosmos II or the HAF X can.
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June 22, 2012 4:41:39 PM

blackhawk ultra should be able to support dual socket server stuff. the odd thing is how to people carry a case the size of a desk to a LAN party
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June 22, 2012 4:44:26 PM

Thank you all for your input. I'm gonna do some more research.

so I've figured I'm gonna try to get a higher end motherboard, case, and cpu, then add on as needed.

I'm not sure about this but it seems like a good start.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aCQb

any more suggestions on any part would be nice. start fresh or just change.

Thank you again.
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June 22, 2012 4:48:25 PM

you dont need the blackhawk ultra for the WS board. but if you want to get liquild cooling (which is not necessary at all for 4ghz), you should go out and get couple of 120,240,or480mm radiatiors and a waterblock for both the CPU and the GPUs
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Best solution

June 22, 2012 4:52:25 PM

Buying big now to save later is, in my opinion, a losing strategy.
In a year or two, every major component will be replaced by faster and cheaper offerings.
Better to buy what serves your needs well today, and save the difference for another change in the future.
Your needs may change, and what is offered will certainly change.

With a big budget now, I would look first to a great monitor. I am talking about a 30" 2560 x 1600 display, or a 27" 2560 x 1440 display. They are expensive, think $1000 or so. But, it is one of the few parts that I do not think will be obsoleted for some time.

For gaming, realize that few games use more than 2 or 3 cores. The extra hyperthreads of a 3770K will go largely unused.
Today, there is nothing better for gaming than a 3570K.

If you want quiet, buy a quiet case. Do some research on www.silentpcreview.com
Cases to look at are the Antec P280, SOLOII, Fractal define r2/r3, and the Corsaor obsidian 550d.

SPCR also has articles on quiet cpu coolers. The Noctua NH-D14 should be looked at.
If you value quiet, don't bother with liquid cooling. A liquid cooler might be good for maximum overclocks and dangerous voltage levels. If you NEED to oc past 4.5, the OK, but do you really need that? In a decently well ventilated case, a good air cooler will do just as well.

You are starting with a SLI graphics based pc.
Unless you are planning on triple monitor gaming, or a career in professional first person shooter gaming, a great single card will do the job.
a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

A single GTX670 is so close to a GTX680, that the extra $100 for the GTX680 does not seem much worth it. But with a big busget, why not a GTX680?
If you really want to buy the best, a single GTX690 is, in effect a sli GTX680 on a single card.

I heartily agree with a SSD. I would prefer Samsung or Intel. They make their own nand chips, and can do a better job of validation; they seem to have fewer issues.
It is not wrong to overprovision your PSU a bit. It will run quieter under load. Look at the Seasonic gold rated X series. They are the best quality, and will be mostly silent.
Share
June 22, 2012 6:19:42 PM

geofelt said:
Buying big now to save later is, in my opinion, a losing strategy.
In a year or two, every major component will be replaced by faster and cheaper offerings.
Better to buy what serves your needs well today, and save the difference for another change in the future.
Your needs may change, and what is offered will certainly change.

With a big budget now, I would look first to a great monitor. I am talking about a 30" 2560 x 1600 display, or a 27" 2560 x 1440 display. They are expensive, think $1000 or so. But, it is one of the few parts that I do not think will be obsoleted for some time.

For gaming, realize that few games use more than 2 or 3 cores. The extra hyperthreads of a 3770K will go largely unused.
Today, there is nothing better for gaming than a 3570K.

If you want quiet, buy a quiet case. Do some research on www.silentpcreview.com
Cases to look at are the Antec P280, SOLOII, Fractal define r2/r3, and the Corsaor obsidian 550d.

SPCR also has articles on quiet cpu coolers. The Noctua NH-D14 should be looked at.
If you value quiet, don't bother with liquid cooling. A liquid cooler might be good for maximum overclocks and dangerous voltage levels. If you NEED to oc past 4.5, the OK, but do you really need that? In a decently well ventilated case, a good air cooler will do just as well.

You are starting with a SLI graphics based pc.
Unless you are planning on triple monitor gaming, or a career in professional first person shooter gaming, a great single card will do the job.
a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

A single GTX670 is so close to a GTX680, that the extra $100 for the GTX680 does not seem much worth it. But with a big busget, why not a GTX680?
If you really want to buy the best, a single GTX690 is, in effect a sli GTX680 on a single card.

I heartily agree with a SSD. I would prefer Samsung or Intel. They make their own nand chips, and can do a better job of validation; they seem to have fewer issues.
It is not wrong to overprovision your PSU a bit. It will run quieter under load. Look at the Seasonic gold rated X series. They are the best quality, and will be mostly silent.



thanks bro. it took me forever to explain
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June 23, 2012 5:07:37 AM

Thanks that really helps me figure out what im wanting. Ill give it some time looking in to many different products. and ill be back when i get all the parts or find something new i have questions about.

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June 23, 2012 5:07:45 AM

Best answer selected by taterhead114.
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