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Putting Together First Gaming Computer

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June 22, 2012 9:41:48 PM

Hello! I decided to earn my nerd cred and thus it is time for me to build my first computer rather than go through Dell or Alienware again. I also wanted to get a desktop computer because I've been gaming on laptops for the past six years and eventual heating and battery issues always cause me to end up tethered to a cooling pad and outlet anyways.

I selected the parts that I'd like to purchase for this computer and have tried to make sure that there aren't any conflicts, but I'd really appreciate any feedback about my build. Here they are (links are for information, not necessarily where the best price is):

Case: Cooler Master RC-942-KKN1 ("Full" size) Link
Motherboard: ASRock Extreme9 Link
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K (3.4 GHz, quad core) Link
RAM: G.Skill F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL (16 GB total) Link
Hard Drive 1: Seagate ST2000DM001 (2 TB) Link
Hard Drive 2: Samsung 830 SSD (256 GB) Link
Disc Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 (Blu-ray, DVD writer) Link
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 (2 TB) Link
Power Supply: Cooler Master RSA00-AMBAJ3-US (1000W) Link
Monitor 1: Asus VS247H-P (23.6" 2ms) Link
Monitor 2: Asus VS247H-P (23.6" 2ms) Link
OS: Microsoft Windows 7

My primary use for this will be gaming, but I also want to do some software development and minor photo and video editing on it. I also wanted it to have lots of room for future additions, hence the "full" size and the 1000W PSU (the calculated power drain for the above is approximately 513W). My soft budget is $2,000, but I can possibly go up to around $2,500 (which is what the above approximately comes to without tax and shipping).

Are there any conflicts with the parts that I described above? Are there better parts to use or parts that I could go for a lesser version if my primary focus is gaming?

Thanks in advance for all your help!
June 22, 2012 10:38:45 PM

That build is great. If you want to save some money, I will give you some places.

The case, you could save here, but that's not overly priced for your budget. If you are getting that case because you feel you need a full tower, you don't. Mid tower's (depending on the case of course) are pretty spacious.

That motherboard is way more than you need. Five PCI-3.0 slots? Good luck filling that up. You could get a $140 Extreme4 and be fine or go to an extreme6 if you want a few more SATA ports. Here is where you could really save some cash.

Normally for gaming only 8gb is really needed, but if you do some editing, 16gb might come in handy.

That GTX680 to me is overpriced. Check Tom's Hardware benches (or anyone's for that matter). The GTX670 run's about 5-8% slower and costs 75% as much. If you have the money, there is nothing wrong with a 680, but if you want to save and not lose all that much, get the 670.

For your PSU, you are way overkill on the 1000W. With that card all you need is about 550W and if you wanted to CF later, 750-800W. Try something similar to this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Try sticking to Seasonic, Corsair, XFX, Antec.

Don't waste your money on anything other than win7 home unless you need stuff like XP emulation.

Also, don't forget a cooler if you plan to OC. AND make sure you get ram without heat sinks as they can interfere with some coolers.

Best solution

June 23, 2012 2:24:33 AM
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You DO NOT need a $160 case. A mid tower will have more than enough room for you. I thing you can get a decent case for $50, but if you really want something special, then try to spend $75. $100 MAX. Mid tower cases offer plenty of room.

Here's a good case http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Secondly, Motherboard. $350? You really don't need to spend that much, especially with an i5. Scrap that Motherboard.
Here are some good options for cheaper
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $200
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $220, same manufacturer.

Although a feature-rich motherboard is always a good thing, $200+ is usually enough. If you told me you were using a 3930/60k, my advice would be to go for that MOBO, but with an i5...an I5! it's definitely not the best use of your money.

The CPU....
For a 2K+ build, you should definitely get a better CPU. A 3770K is definitely a worthwhile upgrade. If you were spending close to 3K i would advise a 3930K, but for you, I would get the 3770K.
The CPU will improve your performance, the large case will not.

The RAM is fine, but i will tell you that 16GB is overkill. I would personally get 8GB of Faster RAM, but either is fine. Also, get 2X8GB rather then 4X4, leave room for expansion.

Here are those options:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Faster
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Less but faster

The first is more expensive and faster, the second is faster but is only 8GB and is about the same price. Be sure to check with your motherboard to see what is compatible.

Capacity HD is good.

Your getting ripped off on your SSD, the exact same one on Newegg with a free game download is only $300.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you really want a BR drive then i guess that is a good one, i don't know a lot on CD/DVD drives, but there are some that i saw for ~$55 with BR support.

680 is an amazing card, but 670 is only marginally worse (<10% I recall) and is much cheaper. i would stick with one or two of those, depending on your budget.
The 7970/50 are better that the 680/70 in GPGPU, so those in Xfire could be a viable option to.

PSU is overkill, but better safe than sorry. If the budget requires so, then i would cut it down to ~850 watt and get SLI 670's, or something like that. So far my CM PSU is doing well, and the tech support is also very good.

I've never been a fan of multi monitors, I would prefer one larger monitor and put the money towards components, but if that's what you want, go for it :) 

And if you are using 16GB+ you need win 7 prof

Hope i helped you out!
Related resources
June 23, 2012 3:43:58 AM

650W is enough for twin 670s. Get a 750W if you must. Trust meh. You've got the money, so get something efficient: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Two monitors don't work well. You get a big old double bezel right in the middle of your screen. You'll have to add a third. If you bump down to 21", three might even cost the same as your current two.
June 25, 2012 1:06:59 AM

kajabla said:
650W is enough for twin 670s. Get a 750W if you must. Trust meh. You've got the money, so get something efficient: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Two monitors don't work well. You get a big old double bezel right in the middle of your screen. You'll have to add a third. If you bump down to 21", three might even cost the same as your current two.



That's why I don't like dual-monitor setups, either 3 or 1.
June 26, 2012 5:31:05 AM

Thank you all for your feedback. It's been really useful to see where I've gone way overboard. :p 

Taking what everyone on here and other forums have said, I have adjusted my build accordingly and it can be seen on PCPartPicker.com (much easier than formatting links on different forums :)  ):

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aPzX

Explanations for my changes are as follows:

CPU: I took mastrom101's advice and bumped up my CPU.
Motherboard: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and went with a less crazy motherboard.
Memory: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and went with faster but less memory. I don't really want or need Windows 7 Professional to support 16 GB, and I won't be doing video editing frequently enough to justify 16 GB of memory.
Hard Drive: I went from 2 TB to 1 TB with better reviews. For the 2 TB hard drives, it seemed like there were a lot more issues in the reviews or less reviews overall than for 1 TB drives, I assume because they are newer and have some issues that have already been ironed out with the 1 TB drives. I also already have 500 GB and 640 GB external hard drives, so if 1 TB isn't lasting for me, I have some backup options (as well as just putting in another internal hard drive). I've been sitting on about 300 GB of space for OS, games, documents, and downloads for about two years, so I can live with a smaller internal drive.
SSD: I know the previous link I gave for the SSD had an absurd price, but that was because of an Amazon price error. It was previously $270 on Amazon when I first found it, and I've seen that other sites have it even cheaper.
Video Card: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and bumped down to a GeForce GTX 670. I saw the comparisons on tomshardware.com charts, so that made a lot of sense.
Case: I went with a case that was a step up from what mastrom101 suggested since it had a few extra features and had a rebate that brought it to $10 more than the one linked in his post.
PSU: I took the advice of every single person who laid eyes on my build. :p  I reduced it to a 700W PSU since lowering other things in this build gave me an estimated wattage of 428W (and 559W if I SLI'ed another GTX 680 card). Would it be better to pay more and get the one kajabla suggested (I mainly picked this one out because of the better price and the focus on making it quiet, though that's not a big issue for me unless it sounds like a motorcycle under my desk)?

Just to clarify some other things in my build, I had wanted two monitors mainly for doing work on the computer (e.g. programming IDE or photo/editing software on one screen, browser for reading info on the other screen). All gaming would be done on one screen, and the other screen would be turned off or used to read something game-related while playing rather than alt-tabbing. I know the goofiness of two-monitor FPS'ing where you can't see the target, but I don't think I'd make too much use out of a three-monitor setup. :) 

Are there any other tweaks I should make for my build? I really appreciate everyone's help on this forum making this learning process a lot easier. :) 
June 27, 2012 2:07:17 AM

Well, that mobo's still too expensive. Just get the Z77 Extreme4 and save another $60.
Get 1600mhz RAM. RAM speed doesn't make much of a difference. I promise you won't notice.
I don't really like CM as a PSU brand. I don't even really have a good reason for that. I just think it's a good idea to stick to the brands with the best reputations, because PSU reliability is enormously important. I don't really know why I posted that 750W model before, as you really only need 650W. I retract my earlier link.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
June 27, 2012 5:33:34 AM

Alright, I think I have a winner here:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($249.95 @ B&H)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.18 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: Corsair 650W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2279.10
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Yes, I know I don't need an i7 for gaming, but since I will use this computer also for video/photo editing as well as software development, it should be useful. I went with some suggested parts from this forum and others, which brought my price down enough to go SLI'ing with two GeForce GTX 670s which I'm excited about. :) 

Any final things I should take into account? This has been a great experience for me and I really appreciate everyone's help. :) 
June 27, 2012 6:57:09 AM

Get a better monitor. SLI at 1080p is a waste of $. Get an eyefinity setup or drop one GTX 670.
June 27, 2012 11:18:59 AM

^It's true that 670s are currently OP for a single monitor. The effect that this will have on your build is your choice, though. Pretty soon there will be games available that will tax both 670s.
June 28, 2012 12:58:49 AM

BunBun007 said:
Thank you all for your feedback. It's been really useful to see where I've gone way overboard. :p 

Taking what everyone on here and other forums have said, I have adjusted my build accordingly and it can be seen on PCPartPicker.com (much easier than formatting links on different forums :)  ):

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/aPzX

Explanations for my changes are as follows:

CPU: I took mastrom101's advice and bumped up my CPU.
Motherboard: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and went with a less crazy motherboard.
Memory: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and went with faster but less memory. I don't really want or need Windows 7 Professional to support 16 GB, and I won't be doing video editing frequently enough to justify 16 GB of memory.
Hard Drive: I went from 2 TB to 1 TB with better reviews. For the 2 TB hard drives, it seemed like there were a lot more issues in the reviews or less reviews overall than for 1 TB drives, I assume because they are newer and have some issues that have already been ironed out with the 1 TB drives. I also already have 500 GB and 640 GB external hard drives, so if 1 TB isn't lasting for me, I have some backup options (as well as just putting in another internal hard drive). I've been sitting on about 300 GB of space for OS, games, documents, and downloads for about two years, so I can live with a smaller internal drive.
SSD: I know the previous link I gave for the SSD had an absurd price, but that was because of an Amazon price error. It was previously $270 on Amazon when I first found it, and I've seen that other sites have it even cheaper.
Video Card: I took cranked and mastrom101's advice and bumped down to a GeForce GTX 670. I saw the comparisons on tomshardware.com charts, so that made a lot of sense.
Case: I went with a case that was a step up from what mastrom101 suggested since it had a few extra features and had a rebate that brought it to $10 more than the one linked in his post.
PSU: I took the advice of every single person who laid eyes on my build. :p  I reduced it to a 700W PSU since lowering other things in this build gave me an estimated wattage of 428W (and 559W if I SLI'ed another GTX 680 card). Would it be better to pay more and get the one kajabla suggested (I mainly picked this one out because of the better price and the focus on making it quiet, though that's not a big issue for me unless it sounds like a motorcycle under my desk)?

Just to clarify some other things in my build, I had wanted two monitors mainly for doing work on the computer (e.g. programming IDE or photo/editing software on one screen, browser for reading info on the other screen). All gaming would be done on one screen, and the other screen would be turned off or used to read something game-related while playing rather than alt-tabbing. I know the goofiness of two-monitor FPS'ing where you can't see the target, but I don't think I'd make too much use out of a three-monitor setup. :) 

Are there any other tweaks I should make for my build? I really appreciate everyone's help on this forum making this learning process a lot easier. :) 


Glad to see I could help. When you have received enough feedback, you can select a best answer and a mod will close the thread for you.

Looks Great. The only things I can suggest are:
The Cooler Master SilentPro is an amazing PSU, i would recommend it over a corsair but you can pick.
I think it's worth it to upgrade the RAM to a faster speed, but again your choice.
I don't think you need two 670's, i would wait and see if you need it, but again, your choice.

Good Luck

June 28, 2012 1:25:37 AM

Time to pull the benchmark. From Tom's "Does High-Speed DDR3 Help AMD's FX?" review: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/bulldozer-ddr3-over...
Page through the graphs if you like. They show a difference of around 2fps in gaming between 1600mhz and 2400mhz. Worth it? No. If your living is made on speedy WinRAR conversion, by all means go for the 2400 kit, but otherwise, and especially for gaming, it's just not worth going over 1600mhz.
June 28, 2012 1:40:52 AM

DONT FORGET A CPU COOLER sorry for caps but dfnfkjfn53
June 28, 2012 1:51:32 AM

There's one on the part list. Almost a nice catch, though.
June 28, 2012 2:51:14 AM

kajabla said:
Time to pull the benchmark. From Tom's "Does High-Speed DDR3 Help AMD's FX?" review: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/bulldozer-ddr3-over...
Page through the graphs if you like. They show a difference of around 2fps in gaming between 1600mhz and 2400mhz. Worth it? No. If your living is made on speedy WinRAR conversion, by all means go for the 2400 kit, but otherwise, and especially for gaming, it's just not worth going over 1600mhz.


For some of the other purposes he listed, higher speed RAM does help. For $30 i think it's worth it, but that's up to him to decide.

June 28, 2012 7:27:24 PM

Alright, I believe this is the final build:

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg) (I was glad to catch this deal :) )
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.18 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($88.74 @ CompUSA)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($76.21 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2046.53
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Just to clarify again, I will do gaming on a single monitor but when I do programming or video/photo editing, I may want the software and a browser open and visible at the same time, hence why I have a second monitor.

With the 1600 vs. 2400 RAM, will the difference that mastrom101 talked about with the other ways I will use my computer be automatic or would it require overclocking? At the moment, I'm looking for a plug-and-play computer, so I won't be doing any overclocking. A similar question is whether I need a CPU cooler if I won't be doing any overclocking (i.e. is the fan the CPU comes with not sufficient?)? If both the 2400 RAM and CPU cooler speed the computer up without requiring overclocking, I'll get those.

I dropped one of the GeForce GTX 670s under the assumption that I will live off one of them for now and then when I start encountering performance issues with newer games I'll grab a second one, which will hopefully be cheaper by then.

As for the standard of selecting a "best answer," do I choose the post that includes my final build or do I choose the most helpful answer related to one of my builds?
June 28, 2012 9:40:26 PM

BunBun007 said:
Alright, I believe this is the final build:

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg) (I was glad to catch this deal :) )
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.18 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($88.74 @ CompUSA)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($76.21 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2046.53
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Just to clarify again, I will do gaming on a single monitor but when I do programming or video/photo editing, I may want the software and a browser open and visible at the same time, hence why I have a second monitor.

With the 1600 vs. 2400 RAM, will the difference that mastrom101 talked about with the other ways I will use my computer be automatic or would it require overclocking? At the moment, I'm looking for a plug-and-play computer, so I won't be doing any overclocking. A similar question is whether I need a CPU cooler if I won't be doing any overclocking (i.e. is the fan the CPU comes with not sufficient?)? If both the 2400 RAM and CPU cooler speed the computer up without requiring overclocking, I'll get those.

I dropped one of the GeForce GTX 670s under the assumption that I will live off one of them for now and then when I start encountering performance issues with newer games I'll grab a second one, which will hopefully be cheaper by then.

As for the standard of selecting a "best answer," do I choose the post that includes my final build or do I choose the most helpful answer related to one of my builds?


The CPU Fan isn't needed if you aren't going to be overclocking. It will keep you CPU even cooler, but the stock cooler should be fine for this. Intel has designed it so the CPU can run at full throttle and still stay at a safe operating temperature. A third party cooler is nice, but is not necessary.

On the other hand, the RAM will give an immediate performance boost. You will not need to overclock it, it is plug and play.

So i would drop the CPU cooler for faster ram. You would notice a minor performance different with that.

Also, good choice on the GPU.

Finally, you pick the answer with the best advice. I don't even think you can select yourself for best answer.

June 29, 2012 12:57:09 AM

What would make you think the OP isn't going to be OCing? You'd have to be crazy to get a -K CPU and not overclock it, and an OCed IB processor definitely needs a third-party heatsink.
June 29, 2012 1:54:14 AM

He stated above that he wouldn't be overclocking.

I have a 2500K and i didn't overclock either...
June 29, 2012 2:13:36 AM

Yeah, but you and the OP are both crazy, and I figure once I get the message across the OP will be glad to have a heatsink. OCing is totally safe, very easy and gives you a ton of free performance. It doesn't have to happen immediately, and there won't be any need for it immediately, but when the time rolls around for the next CPU upgrade you and the OP will both be able to jack up your processors instead of buying new ones and save several hundred dollars. You'll get your next upgrade for free. That's why one overclocks.
June 29, 2012 2:22:30 AM

kajabla said:
Yeah, but you and the OP are both crazy, and I figure once I get the message across the OP will be glad to have a heatsink. OCing is totally safe, very easy and gives you a ton of free performance. It doesn't have to happen immediately, and there won't be any need for it immediately, but when the time rolls around for the next CPU upgrade you and the OP will both be able to jack up your processors instead of buying new ones and save several hundred dollars. You'll get your next upgrade for free. That's why one overclocks.


I have no need too. The stock 2500K is more than enough for me.

Also, it's not really free. I would need to pay ~$35 for a CPU cooler and then $5-10 for some good thermal paste. I would prefer to put that money towards a GPU upgrade (560ti instead of 560, 6870 instead of 6770) than for CPU performance.

It also reduces the lifespan and stability of the CPU/system.

If i do need more power, I'll overclock it. But for now, I'm fine with it.
June 29, 2012 2:50:57 AM

Thermal paste beyond what's included with a cooler will give you two or three degrees max of performance, so that's not an issue. $35 for a cooler, sure, but isn't that better than $200 for a CPU?
Stability is not an issue with mild overclocks, going, say, to 4.1ghz on a 2500K instead of the maximum OC of 4.5 or 4.7ghz. Lifespan could be affected by heat issues, but again, that's not a big issue with mild overclocking, and I think your 2500K will become totally obsolete long before it dies.
Right. You don't need to OC now. You'll need to in two or three years, though, as I said.
June 29, 2012 4:10:41 AM

So it sounds like what I would want is to keep the 3770K, but I don't need to buy a 3rd party CPU cooler until down the road when I want to overclock to keep the CPU comparable to whatever the speeds are at the time. Therefore, I'll take out the CPU cooler out of this build's list of things to buy and use the stock cooler that comes with it for now (I assume I can remove it later and put on the 3rd party CPU cooler without damaging the CPU, right?).

Thanks again, everyone, for your advice and suggestions. Tomorrow, I will begin the process of going down the list and purchasing my parts! :D 
June 29, 2012 5:06:11 AM

I recommend that you get the sink now. Yes, you can replace it later, but it's fairly annoying and involves removing the previous thermal compound from the CPU with alcohol and probably removing the motherboard from the case, along with all the cable management that implies. Just get it done now and you'll be closer to the plug-and-play PC you want.
June 29, 2012 8:11:08 AM

Alrighty, then here's the final final build. :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($96.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.18 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($88.74 @ CompUSA)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($76.21 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2083.53
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Unless anything is horribly wrong, these parts will be ordered tomorrow! :D 
June 29, 2012 8:26:53 AM

What makes you think for gaming an i7 is warranted? The only game it will help in is BF3, and even that won't be by much. You CF/SLIng? If not, the Extreme4 is a waste of $. Get the Pro3 Gen3 if not CF/SLIng.
June 29, 2012 1:22:35 PM

Both of your issues are addressed earlier in this thread. Read the discussions you're entering. From the OP: "Yes, I know I don't need an i7 for gaming, but since I will use this computer also for video/photo editing as well as software development, it should be useful. I went with some suggested parts from this forum and others, which brought my price down enough to go SLI'ing with two GeForce GTX 670s which I'm excited about."
June 29, 2012 1:38:19 PM

BunBun007 said:
Alrighty, then here's the final final build. :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.98 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($96.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($417.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.18 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($88.74 @ CompUSA)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($76.21 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($184.99 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2083.53
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)

Unless anything is horribly wrong, these parts will be ordered tomorrow! :D 


Looks Good!
June 29, 2012 11:56:53 PM

Parts are now inbound! Thanks again for everyone's help! :) 
June 29, 2012 11:57:26 PM

Best answer selected by BunBun007.
!