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Alarming PSU voltages?

So I fired up CPU ID, I don't usually use it. I don't know why but today I'm wondering if theres something wrong with the voltages. My computer doesn't have any problems, never had it shut off, never had a blue screen now I'm just nervous.

This is what the Voltages read:
CPU VCORE .99V to 1.38V
VIN1 1.95V
+3.3V 3.35V
+5V 5.00 to 5.03V
+12V 12.16 to 12.22V
+5V VCCH .30 to 1.02V
VBAT 3.10V

now this is what alarms me the most
-12V -16.19V

I'm hoping that it's something wrong with the software monitoring like I said my computer runs fine and usually always has (besides when my old GPU died, I OC'd it to high by accident, and then the monitor went shortly after that). I checked all over the internet and nobody seems to even bother reporting the -12V line.

I run a 32 bit OS but I have 2Gbx4 of RAM because I used to run Xubuntu Linux until I came across this free Win7 and never bothered to remove the RAM (it works fine so I don't want to mess with it). It's a good quality XFX Core Edition 750W that I spent a lot of money on, and I've had it for 3 or 4 months now. Also it's plugged into a pretty big/decent surge protector, if that number has anything to do with grounding perhaps?
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about alarming voltages
  1. that hwinfo isn't giving me the voltages for the -12v,
  2. Best answer
    speedfan got it but it is not good i got 4,01 v on the - 12 volts that the only one of all i use who is reporting the -12 volts
  3. You have 4.01V? So does that mean it's alright for it to be off?
  4. look like the way it work because all my other voltages are in the specs and system work good
  5. Well thats good to know, I've been looking around on the internet all day and someone, I think with my same PSU even, reported -16V on his -12V and nobody said anything about it.

    If anyone else has anything else to throw in I like to hear from as many people I can.
  6. The -12V rail is pretty much obsolete now and is only kept on to provide backward compatibility with older hardware. Some older types of serial port circuits required both -12V and +12V voltages, but since almost no one except industrial users use serial ports anymore you as a typical home user can pretty much disregard this rail.
  7. ko888 said:
    The -12V rail is pretty much obsolete now and is only kept on to provide backward compatibility with older hardware. Some older types of serial port circuits required both -12V and +12V voltages, but since almost no one except industrial users use serial ports anymore you as a typical home user can pretty much disregard this rail.

    Funny, I was just lamenting my computer not having a serial port. Damn the average user for not using old, obscure interfaces! My kingdom for a DE-9!
  8. ko888 said:
    The -12V rail is pretty much obsolete now and is only kept on to provide backward compatibility with older hardware. Some older types of serial port circuits required both -12V and +12V voltages, but since almost no one except industrial users use serial ports anymore you as a typical home user can pretty much disregard this rail.

    Well then, that explains why I couldn't find anything on the internet about it, and why different hardware monitoring things wouldn't report it.
  9. mace200200 said:
    Well then, that explains why I couldn't find anything on the internet about it, and why different hardware monitoring things wouldn't report it.

    With some power supplies the absence of a load on a rail will cause unusual (i.e. out of spec) voltage readings because it was never designed to handle no load situations.
  10. ko888 said:
    With some power supplies the absence of a load on a rail will cause unusual (i.e. out of spec) voltage readings because it was never designed to handle no load situations.

    Whew that's great news for me, between you and the other guy saying that his was at like -4V or something makes me feel a whole lot better. Thanks
  11. Best answer selected by mace200200.
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