Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Build a pc myself,or let the store do it?

Last response: in Systems
Share
June 25, 2012 12:00:29 PM

So heres the thing,i really want to build a pc myself,but i think i wont be capable of getting all the sata ports etc in the right place,so i thought pay so the store does it for me,but heres the thing,it costs 400 litas (140 dollars) at my local shop,and i am a bit short on money,my built about 1450,and i cant go over it,so i think about building it myself,are there any videos that will completely show me where and how to plug all the wires correctly?or someone here can give me a guide?

More about : build store

June 25, 2012 12:08:18 PM

What ever suits you. Just remember with a home build, if your computer doesn't start, you don't know what part isnt working, and you will have to test each one individually. The Shop will make sure it works and will probably give you better safety in terms of computer parts. I payed the extra $100 for the labour to build it, and I personally think its worth it.
June 25, 2012 12:15:07 PM

If you have ever put together Lego, you can put together a PC. It it mostly just looking at plugs and ports and figuring which way it goes in.

all the ports and plugs for pretty much every cable are designed to be only inserted one way, if you tried otherwise you would have to break the plastic.

Heres a pretty comprehensive video guide from NCIX.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIJx6Y3tofg&feature=plcp

Two things I would differ from the guide is putting on the CPU cooler before mounting the motherboard, regardless of cutouts in the case, its just simpler.

And always testbench the system before putting it in the case. So assemble the CPU (and its cooler), Graphics card, RAM, HDD's on the motherboard and hook it all up the power supply and see if it works before you go to the effort of putting it in the case. Make sure its on a wooden table or the box the mobo came in so you don't short out anything.

And another on Cable Management (which you should do)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERhxmzQR6xA&feature=plcp
Related resources
June 25, 2012 12:43:17 PM

manofchalk said:
If you have ever put together Lego, you can put together a PC. It it mostly just looking at plugs and ports and figuring which way it goes in.

all the ports and plugs for pretty much every cable are designed to be only inserted one way, if you tried otherwise you would have to break the plastic.

Heres a pretty comprehensive video guide from NCIX.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIJx6Y3tofg&feature=plcp

Two things I would differ from the guide is putting on the CPU cooler before mounting the motherboard, regardless of cutouts in the case, its just simpler.

And always testbench the system before putting it in the case. So assemble the CPU (and its cooler), Graphics card, RAM, HDD's on the motherboard and hook it all up the power supply and see if it works before you go to the effort of putting it in the case. Make sure its on a wooden table or the box the mobo came in so you don't short out anything.

And another on Cable Management (which you should do)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERhxmzQR6xA&feature=plcp


Well yes,i really liked lego :D ,okey,i am gonna try it myself,one more question,is the modular psu gonna have every power cable i will need?thanks anyway,very helpfull :) 
June 25, 2012 1:02:35 PM

Modular power supply's will have every cable you need on them.

Only possible issue would be the number of SATA power connectors, but unless your running massive storage (Talking 6+ drives) you should be fine, and even then you could get a Molex-SATA converter to fix that problem.
June 25, 2012 1:22:17 PM

manofchalk said:
Modular power supply's will have every cable you need on them.

Only possible issue would be the number of SATA power connectors, but unless your running massive storage (Talking 6+ drives) you should be fine, and even then you could get a Molex-SATA converter to fix that problem.


This is my build,check it through if you can :

Corsair Carbide 500r
HX 750W
Samsung DVD RW
1TB Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM 64MB
Kingston 64GB SSD
ASRock Z77 Extreme 4
8GB DDR3 Corsair Vengeance
i5 3570K
Corsair H100
Gigabyte GTX 670

Also some question,is this build bottlenecked?Will i be able to SLI,overclock?Is everything comaptible?
June 25, 2012 1:32:40 PM

Make sure that Optical connects by SATA, not IDE.

Its a very good gaming rig with potential for dual GTX670's later, I see no problem with it.
Depending on how far you'r going to overclock that CPU, the H100 may be a bit overkill. If your only going to a max 4.3Ghz, the much cheaper Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO is sufficient. It wont conflict with the RAM so don't worry about that. Use the saved cash to get a bigger SSD.
June 25, 2012 1:37:14 PM

manofchalk said:
Make sure that Optical connects by SATA, not IDE.

Its a very good gaming rig with potential for dual GTX670's later, I see no problem with it.
Depending on how far you'r going to overclock that CPU, the H100 may be a bit overkill. If your only going to a max 4.3Ghz, the much cheaper Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO is sufficient. It wont conflict with the RAM so don't worry about that. Use the saved cash to get a bigger SSD.


okey thanks for all your help,i am going the get the parts now,bye :) 
June 25, 2012 1:51:29 PM

I'm sure you can do it. Here are my best tips for you:
1. The easiest thing to damage is the CPU when installing into the socket. Make sure you know how it goes in properly before you lock it down. If it's an intel, there are two notches that it fits right into, if it's an AMD, make sure the arrows on the corner match. AMDs are a little harder, I recommend intel anyway.
2. Make sure your standoffs on the case match the holes on the motherboard. It is more important that there is no standoff where there is no hole, because it will short out the board.
3. The only confusing part can be your front panel connectors. The USB and audio are a block usually, very easy. The power LED, HD LED, power, reset buttons are a little trickier, but you manual will tell you how to hook them up. The color is positive and the white is negative. The LEDs have to be right, the power and reset switches can be backwards and won't hurt anything.
June 25, 2012 2:04:02 PM

Do it for the experience. One thing is to know the things that appear on the monitor, another thing is to know what is and happens inside the computer.

Prepare yourself by watching and reading several how-to videos and articles.

My first build was like a breeze. Read the motherboard manual. Be careful (especially with the CPU - drop it in the socket, do NOT push down or wiggle it at all). Take your time (use a whole day - there is lots to be done after building the computer too, like installing drivers etc etc etc).
June 25, 2012 5:58:32 PM

nafoni said:
Do it for the experience. One thing is to know the things that appear on the monitor, another thing is to know what is and happens inside the computer.

Prepare yourself by watching and reading several how-to videos and articles.

My first build was like a breeze. Read the motherboard manual. Be careful (especially with the CPU - drop it in the socket, do NOT push down or wiggle it at all). Take your time (use a whole day - there is lots to be done after building the computer too, like installing drivers etc etc etc).


Yes i really think the expierence will work for me,i want my world to take a turn somewhere to computer technologies,i am just 14,so i still can choose,its not late :) ,i already watched neweggs how to,ncix,and searching for more,cuz in every video i learn something new :) .And yes,i will try to control myself and not push the cpu,but what if i drop it a little bad?i mean i miss it?
June 25, 2012 6:35:11 PM

You aren't suppose to drop it from high point.lol Just a few mm from the soccket, if you line the notches up you can't miss.
!