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Power Supply Blown Out Twice in One Month?

Last response: in Systems
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June 25, 2012 4:09:40 PM

My Build:

GIGABYTE GA-Z68A-D3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 ATX Intel Motherboard

Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623I72600K

Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CW080G310 2.5" 80GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) - OEM

Western Digital Caviar Green WD7500AARX 750GB IntelliPower 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

CORSAIR XMS 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMX8GX3M2A1600C9

ATI 100-505606 FirePro V4800 1GB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Workstation Video Card

CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 650W ATX12V v2.31/ EPS12V v2.92 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC High Performance Power Supply

Windows 7 Professional

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This is my first computer build, which I based heavily off the suggestions from Dassault's official forums on a Solidworks rig for work. Twice in one month, my power supply has blown out. I am connected through a UPS into the wall socket. The first time my PSU blew out, my coworkers mentioned a "pop" sound from my case, with the ceiling lights flickering (sounds like a surge). Our facilities are quite poor, so I am not surprised we have surges, which is why we have UPS's at each computer. The PSU failed the paperclip test and Corsair replaced it one month ago. I swapped out the UPS with a different one (thinking it may not be protecting properly), and one month later, my computer would not turn on, and the new PSU failed the paperclip test this morning. Based on my build, a 650W PSU should be sufficient (I used a PSU calculator and even added a couple hundred extra watts to be safe). This computer is used to run CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations for days on end (very high CPU use for up to a week straight). I use an aftermarket cooler on my CPU to keep things nice and chilly (30-40deg C). In general, the computer performs just fine despite the heavy use.

I am at a complete loss of why this is happening. The UPS should be preventing a surge from injuring my equipment (every other device plugged into the UPS has been totally fine after a surge, and the UPS itself reacts and resets itself after a loss of power from the wall.) Could this be related in any way to the build itself? I followed a Dassault professional's advice very closely on components for my build. Perhaps there is an issue with running at high CPU load for days on end? A blown out PSU seems extreme. Again, I want to stress that our facilities are quite poor, and power outages/surges are not uncommon, hence the UPS's at each desk.

I would greatly appreciate any advice on what is going on here, as the computer is used heavily amongst the small company I work at. Thank you!
June 25, 2012 4:18:07 PM

check your computer could be dust or the fan are not working that pop look like a spark see if there is any wires in the case that could make short so the psu blow itself out for overpower,carefully look at your motherboard for a blow capacitor or resistor bubbling and any sing of burning on the components
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June 25, 2012 4:20:19 PM

scout_03 said:
check your computer could be dust or the fan are not working that pop look like a spark see if there is any wires in the case that could make short so the psu blow itself out for overpower,carefully look at your motherboard for a blow capacitor or resistor bubbling and any sing of burning on the components


Computer is quite clean inside (I cleaned it out after first PSU blew). The fans are all working properly, and blowing in the correct direction. I will take a look at the wires around the area, and see if I notice anything interesting. Thanks for a good start!
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April 28, 2013 6:02:31 AM

Did you ever solve this? Happend to me twice in 2 days :( 
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April 28, 2013 8:14:51 AM

Yedya,

After chasing down countless rabbit holes for weeks, I finally discovered it was an issue with the wall socket I was plugged in to. Although I was plugged in through a UPS with surge protection, an LED on the UPS indicated a "building wiring fault", implying that the UPS was not fully protecting the circuit. A coworker confirmed that the particular wall socket had caused issues in the years previous.

After moving my desk and using a proper wall socket, I have not had any issues. It has been over a year since I moved to a different wall socket.

Unfortunately this fix will probably not help many people, but maybe it's worth ruling out at least. I would have saved weeks of troubleshooting by ruling out the wall socket first.
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April 29, 2013 1:33:01 PM

kyberg said:
Yedya,

After chasing down countless rabbit holes for weeks, I finally discovered it was an issue with the wall socket I was plugged in to. Although I was plugged in through a UPS with surge protection, an LED on the UPS indicated a "building wiring fault", implying that the UPS was not fully protecting the circuit. A coworker confirmed that the particular wall socket had caused issues in the years previous.

After moving my desk and using a proper wall socket, I have not had any issues. It has been over a year since I moved to a different wall socket.

Unfortunately this fix will probably not help many people, but maybe it's worth ruling out at least. I would have saved weeks of troubleshooting by ruling out the wall socket first.

Actually dude,I have the excat same problem...The socket fried my PSU!
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!