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I5 3570k temperature

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November 1, 2012 12:51:19 AM

Hi!
I need help!

specs-
maximus v gene
i5 3570k
2 intake 120 mm (front n side) and 1 exhaust 120mm(back)

First
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First of all i need to know,what exactly cpu reading to consider as various softwares tend to show various temperatures fields and which 1 is correct or necessary to know to get a idea that what temp my processor is currently running at.

monitoring software that i have used , lists various temperature fields related to cpu like
Hwmonitor
cputin, core 1, core 2, core 3, core 4 , package

Aida64
CPU ,CPU Package,CPU IA Cores ,CPU GT Cores ,CPU #1 / Core #1,CPU #1 / Core #2 ,CPU #1 / Core #3,CPU #1 / Core #4.

real temp
simply shows 4 values relating to core.


SO exactly WHICH reading to consider to know what EXACTLY my CPU is working at?

Second
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I am afraid that temperature indicated even when my computer is idle are high.

Assuming if we look at core temperatures
when idle i am getting 38-48 degree Celsius fluctuating.

is it normal or is it HIGH?

i have following cabinet
http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6656

with cpu having stock cooler
and chassis having 3 120mm fans installed 1 at side(intake), 1 at rear(exhaust) and 1 at front(intake).



PLEase guide me.THANKS





More about : 3570k temperature

a c 109 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 1:16:05 AM

Look at your CORE temperatures. Package temperature is your socket, which isn't important.

Each core should have a different temperature, however, this is 100% accurate. Just make sure your hottest core doesn't go past around 72C when you're doing stress tests or do any overclocking and you should be 100% fine :) 
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 1:33:27 AM

The 72C spec is for the CPU package temperature. The core temperature spec for IB goes up to 105C which is covered under Intel's warranty when using the stock HSF.
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Related resources
November 1, 2012 1:34:12 AM

mocchan said:
Look at your CORE temperatures. Package temperature is your socket, which isn't important.

Each core should have a different temperature, however, this is 100% accurate. Just make sure your hottest core doesn't go past around 72C when you're doing stress tests or do any overclocking and you should be 100% fine :) 



When i carried out stress testing at cpu being used 100% as shown in task manager, i have found that real temp software reading core temperatures reads 2 different cores 7-8C above 72C as u mentioned and that to within several seconds of load..

please help me out as i fear cpu getting damaged if heat level shown by software is not acceptable, also my pc is built last week..so what exactly is the problem for that high temperature pls guide me
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a c 109 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 1:35:36 AM

HardwareTwitch said:
When i carried out stress testing at cpu being used 100% as shown in task manager, i have found that real temp software reading core temperatures reads 2 different cores 7-8C above 72C as u mentioned and that to within several seconds of load..

please help me out as i fear cpu getting damaged if heat level shown by software is not acceptable, also my pc is built last week..so what exactly is the problem for that high temperature pls guide me



Sounds completely normal to me. (Regarding cores being 7C apart in temperatures)

**EDIT**

However, as InvalidError has stated, core temps can reach well over 72C and still be safe. I wouldn't worry one bit unless your temperatures start sky rocketing up and past 95C.
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November 1, 2012 1:46:35 AM

mocchan said:
http://i1208.photobucket.com/albums/cc370/wakaranai1432/temps.png

Sounds completely normal to me. (Regarding cores being 7C apart in temperatures)

**EDIT**

However, as InvalidError has stated, core temps can reach well over 72C and still be safe. I wouldn't worry one bit unless your temperatures start sky rocketing up and past 95C.


here is a snapshot of real temp reading AT IDLE STATE

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/689/94731638.png/

i fear of it being overheated as intel says like Tcase around 67 degree celsius

but here with few seconds of 100% cpu load real temp software reads core in degree celsius to some what like this

70 77 78 69(all in degree celsius and attained within2-3 seconds of load)


pls help
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a c 109 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 2:14:55 AM

That sounds completely normal IMO. The reason why my temperatures are so low is because of my ambient temperature being 12C.

If your room is cold as well, then I HIGHLY recommend reseating the Intel CPU cooler.
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 2:27:08 AM

HardwareTwitch said:
i fear of it being overheated as intel says like Tcase around 67 degree celsius

The temperature on Intel's pages are CASE (CPU package) temperatures.

When you look at CORE temperatures, you are looking at JUNCTION temperatures and those can go up to 105C on Ivy Bridge CPUs. The reason why core/junction temperatures are much higher than case/package temperatures is because of thermal resistance between the cores and the package. If the junction-case thermal resistance is 0.4C/W and the CPU is drawing 50W, the junction temperature will be 20C hotter than the case regardless of how good your HSF is.
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November 1, 2012 2:36:37 AM

2678704,7,1073139 said:
That sounds completely normal IMO. The reason why my temperatures are so low is because of my ambient temperature being 12C.

If your room is cold as well, then I HIGHLY recommend reseating the Intel CPU cooler.


I have another doubt HW monitor is showing higher reading than Real temp , which 1 should i follow-real temp shows lesser reading

the real temp shows this reading
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/689/94731638.png/

while hwmonitor shows this reading same time
http://imageshack.us/f/259/84588774.png/

my room temperatur wud be around 25 degree celsius.

so should i go for resetting the intel stock heatsking or should i try prime95,,as i have not used it for stress testing

Quote:
The temperature on Intel's pages are CASE (CPU package) temperatures.


but hw monitor shows same package temp as core temp..hmm?

http://imageshack.us/f/259/84588774.png/
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a c 109 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 2:42:58 AM

Try Prime95 and check your load temperatures. Screenshot and post here :) 

So far, your idle temperatures seem perfectly fine. As for accuracy, they both seem to be within margin of error so I personally wouldn't be too concerned.
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November 1, 2012 3:34:04 AM

mocchan said:
Try Prime95 and check your load temperatures. Screenshot and post here :) 

So far, your idle temperatures seem perfectly fine. As for accuracy, they both seem to be within margin of error so I personally wouldn't be too concerned.



Allright here are the result of running prime95 for ~15-20min

hwmonitor and real temp during prime 95 test:
http://imageshack.us/f/811/43465284.png/


hwmonitor and real temp after 5 mins of prime95 test stopped:
http://imageshack.us/f/839/after5mins.png/

1 thing i forgot to mention and i am adding in this that i have fan xpert 2 installed from asus and i have made a custom profile and these readings were recorded when that self made custom profile was active.

all fans were running at full potential at the time p95 running
1 120mm rear 1200rpm exhaust
1 120mm front 1200rpm intake
1 120mm side 2050rpm intake
cpu fan ~1800-2000rpm

Optional Question
-----------------------------------------
if you consider above readings normal then pls explain to me what is all that which intel says that you have to maintain and not exceed Tcase temperature
what temperature is Tcase exactly and where i can get its reading and how should i maintain it?
------------------------------------------------------------------

so what should be my next step :pt1cable:  :pt1cable:  :pt1cable: 

pls help
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 3:43:55 AM

HardwareTwitch said:
but hw monitor shows same package temp as core temp..hmm?

HWMonitor tells me my 12V rail is at 7V, which is obviously wrong since most components using 12V wouldn't be able to run at anywhere near that low.

Software is known to incorrectly enumerate sensors and mislabel/misinterpret values. Intel's CPUs have a 5th thermal sensor in the CPU monitoring/management circuitry, that's probably the one HWMonitor reports as "package" but since the monitoring circuitry is on-die with all the cores on the same side as everything else away from the HSF, its temperature ends up being practically the same as the cores'.

The motherboard's CPUTIN is likely more representative of actual package temperature. *

Edit: * when it doesn't go wildly out of range for no apparent reason.
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a c 109 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 3:46:17 AM

If I were to base my decision off of RealTemp temperatures, I would suggest re-placing your Intel CPU cooler - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/338655-28-intel-stock...

However, if I were to base my decision off of HWMonitor, I would say you are 100% safe and you have nothing to worry about.

On a side note, +1 to InvalidError.
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November 1, 2012 3:57:56 AM

Quote:
HWMonitor tells me my 12V rail is at 7V, which is obviously wrong since most components using 12V wouldn't be able to run at anywhere near that low.

Software is known to incorrectly enumerate sensors and mislabel/misinterpret values. Intel's CPUs have a 5th thermal sensor in the CPU monitoring/management circuitry, that's probably the one HWMonitor reports as "package" but since the monitoring circuitry is on-die with all the cores on the same side as everything else away from the HSF, its temperature ends up being practically the same as the cores'.

The motherboard's CPUTIN is likely more representative of actual package temperature. *

Edit: * when it doesn't go wildly out of range for no apparent reason.


Quote:
If I were to base my decision off of RealTemp temperatures, I would suggest re-placing your Intel CPU cooler - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/ [...] tion-guide

However, if I were to base my decision off of HWMonitor, I would say you are 100% safe and you have nothing to worry about.

On a side note, +1 to InvalidError.



I don't know which software predicts more accurately but 1 thing i am sure is that i want to save the machine as it has only been 1 week, had it have been years or so i would have been negligent..

So finally guide me RESET cooler OR leave It as it IS?

------------------------------------------
also guys pls clear me intels tcase reading where is it listed in monitoring
software and also intel mention 67.4 degree celsius to maintain

if i assume that tcase reading is listed on monitoring software then i see
no temperature nearby that 67 degree marker .

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

thanks every1 for the posts and pls help me decide.No options just single do this....bam bam!!

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a b à CPUs
November 1, 2012 4:13:53 AM

It doesn't matter what monitoring program you want to base your decision on because both monitoring programs show that your CPU is running well within the temperature spec set by Intel. As long as your core temperatures are not reaching the 105C thermal throttling temperature set by Intel then it is running within spec. If you ever reach that temperature on any core then RealTemp will report Log in the status area at the bottom. OK means just that, everything is Ok.

I have done extensive Prime95 and LinX/Linpack testing and RealTemp does a better job of detecting the highest core temperatures compared to HWMonitor. If you want another opinion or two then download Core Temp or Open Hardware Monitor. Both of those programs will show you almost exactly the same as RealTemp. I am not sure what is up with HWMonitor.

Core Temp
http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/

Open Hardware Monitor
http://openhardwaremonitor.org/


The Intel TCase spec is for system builders. It can only be measured by cutting a groove into the top of your CPU and mounting a thermal couple at the geometric center of your IHS. After you do that you have to solder the sensor so it doesn't move. This spec and this procedure is not for the average Joe end user. There is no software available that can accurately measure the true TCase temperature so forget about that number unless you are willing to sacrifice your CPU to measure it. The TCase number is for a system builder that plans to build thousands or tens of thousands of computers and needs to choose a heatsink and some fans for their system build.

Individual core temperatures change instantaneously. It's very difficult for there to be an identical load on all 4 cores at the same time so slight differences from core to core should be expected. You also have to keep in mind that the sensors that Intel uses are not 100% accurate. +/- 5C is typical and all your temps when loaded seem to be in that range so no worries.

Enjoy your CPU. If you want to overclock it further then invest a few bucks in a better cooler. If you are happy with the current level of performance then leave it as is with the OEM cooler. Your temperatures are fine.

BTW: The GT version of RealTemp is for the 6 core CPUs. You have a 4 core CPU so you should be running RealTemp.exe

Quote:
Package temperature is your socket...


The Package temperature that can be read from Intel Core i CPUs is simply the highest core temperature. HWMonitor does a pretty good job reading that but its core temperatures tend to lag.
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November 1, 2012 12:29:48 PM

Okay guys, i think i am gonna keep it as it is.
thanks for all yer responses.

but i need some more help regarding airflow within case!!

i have ai suite 2 software from asus , it tells about cpu and mobo temp.
so when i ran prime 95(second option test) and adjusted all fans in the system to higest possible rpm , i found that temperatures mentioned didn't went down instead it remained and might have increase 1-2 degress celsius.


So i need HElp regarding where and how should i place my following fans in
the chassis in order to get good airflow and to be able to reduce temperatures let say 2-3 degrees down atleast-

chassis i have
http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6656

fans which i have
2 120mm fan with max.1200rpm(currently installed at front[INtake] and back[Exhaust] in chassis for which i have given link above)

1 120mm fan with max 2100rpm(currently installed as side fan[Instake] upper vent in above chassis)

So help me how to place 3 fans with different rpm to get max out from those 120mmfans and be able to reduce temperatures.

pls guide me
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 1, 2012 2:06:29 PM

Core temperatures are more dependent on the efficiency/rate at which heat can be transferred from the core to the IHS to the HSF and then to air. All the airflow in the world won't help you when most of your temperature rise is between the cores and heatsink.
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November 1, 2012 9:56:01 PM

So i need HElp regarding where and how should i place my following fans in
the chassis in order to get good airflow and to be able to reduce temperatures let say 2-3 degrees down atleast-

chassis i have
http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6656

fans which i have
2 120mm fan with max.1200rpm(currently installed at front[INtake] and back[Exhaust] in chassis for which i have given link above)

1 120mm fan with max 2100rpm(currently installed as side fan[Instake] upper vent in above chassis)

So help me how to place 3 fans with different rpm to get max out from those 120mmfans and be able to reduce temperatures.

pls guide me
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 2, 2012 12:50:09 AM

Unless your case has additional fan mounts, that's pretty much as good as your airflow is going to be.

My i5-3470 has 0 (zero) case fans, only the PSU and GPU fans. CPU core temperatures occasionally hit 75C using Intel's stock HSF. Between room temperature and PSU's exhaust, there is a 12C rise from 25C to 37C, which I would say is pretty good considering how slow the PSU's fan (Antec EA650) is running.

Ivy Bridge simply likes running at ~70C.

Note: I'm using a spare case I had lying around (temporarily evicted my 650MHz P3) until I get an opportunity to borrow a car (or need to rent one for some other reason) and go buy an Antec 302.
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November 2, 2012 2:13:00 AM

InvalidError said:
Unless your case has additional fan mounts, that's pretty much as good as your airflow is going to be.

My i5-3470 has 0 (zero) case fans, only the PSU and GPU fans. CPU core temperatures occasionally hit 75C using Intel's stock HSF. Between room temperature and PSU's exhaust, there is a 12C rise from 25C to 37C, which I would say is pretty good considering how slow the PSU's fan (Antec EA650) is running.

Ivy Bridge simply likes running at ~70C.

Note: I'm using a spare case I had lying around (temporarily evicted my 650MHz P3) until I get an opportunity to borrow a car (or need to rent one for some other reason) and go buy an Antec 302.



you said that yer cores occasionally hit 75 C... do u play games or heavy cpu and graphic consuming programs?
and if yes still it occasionally reaches 75c or its common then?

also wat is yer ambient temperature?

tnx
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a c 124 à CPUs
November 2, 2012 2:39:56 AM

HardwareTwitch said:
you said that yer cores occasionally hit 75 C... do u play games or heavy cpu and graphic consuming programs?
and if yes still it occasionally reaches 75c or its common then?

also wat is yer ambient temperature?

In my reply I said that air temperature rises from 25C intake to 37C PSU exhaust. 25C would be my ambient.

As for what I run, that would be Xilinx ISE, ModelSim, MatLAB, VisualStudio, one or two VMs, some games open in background to tab into while waiting for results, etc. To make my CPU spike to 100% load long enough to reach 75C, I need to run/compile something in a couple of those at the same time.

During more typical usage, cores are closer to 60C with ~50% CPU load.
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