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Can my PSU handle this?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 2, 2012 8:30:45 PM

Hey all, I am looking to add a Radeon HD 6570 to my new comp, which has a stock PSU of only 300 watts.

PSU Model: FSP300-60THA(1)
8 GB RAM
Intel Core i5 2320
1 TB hard drive
1 DVD/RW drive


Also, I am unsure as to whether my PSU runs with one or two lanes on the 12V (which I am told makes a big difference), as the case mentions 3.3V, 5V, 12V1 AND 12v2 (14 amps).

I know Radeon recommends a 400W PSU, but the fact is the 6570 draws less watts than some cards rated for 300W PSU's (like the Geforce 440 for example)...so am I safe or do I need to upgrade?

If someone could check the specs on my PSU and the Radeon 6570 and give me some informed advice I'd greatly appreciate it!


PS:
Newb question here, but the graphics card plugs into the PCIe x16 on the MOBO right? Not the PSU? Because I noticed my current PSU lacks a PCIc x16

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a b U Graphics card
May 2, 2012 9:20:31 PM

The card fits in the PCIe x16 slot on the motherboard but some cards need a 6pin connector from the PSU.
Now with your current system I would not even think about getting anything other than a new PSU. Look at something with at least 600watts from a general brand or 450-500 from a good brand(Corsair, Antec, Seasonic, etc). Then you should get the new graphics card.
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a c 547 U Graphics card
May 2, 2012 10:32:22 PM

rbennett1701 said:
Hey all, I am looking to add a Radeon HD 6570 to my new comp, which has a stock PSU of only 300 watts.

PSU Model: FSP300-60THA(1)
8 GB RAM
Intel Core i5 2320
1 TB hard drive
1 DVD/RW drive


Also, I am unsure as to whether my PSU runs with one or two lanes on the 12V (which I am told makes a big difference), as the case mentions 3.3V, 5V, 12V1 AND 12v2 (14 amps).

I know Radeon recommends a 400W PSU, but the fact is the 6570 draws less watts than some cards rated for 300W PSU's (like the Geforce 440 for example)...so am I safe or do I need to upgrade?

If someone could check the specs on my PSU and the Radeon 6570 and give me some informed advice I'd greatly appreciate it!


PS:
Newb question here, but the graphics card plugs into the PCIe x16 on the MOBO right? Not the PSU? Because I noticed my current PSU lacks a PCIc x16

What is the make and model of the Radeon HD 6570?

The version with GDDR5 memory requires more power than the DDR3 memory version.

Neither version requires a PCI Express supplementary power connector because their Maximum Board Power is less than 75 Watts.
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a c 143 U Graphics card
May 2, 2012 11:20:32 PM

Well, looking at your PSU it looks like a cheap nasty one, but actually if it's even actually rated for 250W it should power the VGA card and the other components without any problem.

But taking everyone's advice, I would get a true 350-450W quality branded PSU.
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May 3, 2012 1:01:25 AM

ko888 said:
What is the make and model of the Radeon HD 6570?

The version with GDDR5 memory requires more power than the DDR3 memory version.

Neither version requires a PCI Express supplementary power connector because their Maximum Board Power is less than 75 Watts.



Its the DD3.. every site says it pulls around 50 watts. And like I said so many of the cards rated for 300 watt machines actually pull a fair amount more than that.. so I assume it's just a numbers game and the real question is, how good is my PSU? It can either handle a variety of low end cards with np, or it won't handle any of them.

Problem is, I get different answers on different sites, ha. Guess I need to just bite the bullet and buy a quality PSU.. which means I'll feel compelled to buy a better graphics card :) 

So either I'm gonna stick an HD 6570 in it now, or replace the PSU and go with a 6770+.. Thanks!
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a c 547 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 1:57:27 AM

rbennett1701 said:
Its the DD3.. every site says it pulls around 50 watts. And like I said so many of the cards rated for 300 watt machines actually pull a fair amount more than that.. so I assume it's just a numbers game and the real question is, how good is my PSU? It can either handle a variety of low end cards with np, or it won't handle any of them.

Problem is, I get different answers on different sites, ha. Guess I need to just bite the bullet and buy a quality PSU.. which means I'll feel compelled to buy a better graphics card :) 

So either I'm gonna stick an HD 6570 in it now, or replace the PSU and go with a 6770+.. Thanks!

The Radeon HD 6570 DDR3 version has a Maximum Board Power of 44 Watts.

During gaming I don't see that card drawing any more than 38 Watts.

All I can say is to try it with your existing power supply because the system power draw is so close to the FSP300-60THA's maximum limit for its +12V rails combined +12 Volt continuous current rating.
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a b U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 2:53:25 AM

The FSP300 is a quite decent little power supply.
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/FSP300-60GHS-Pow...

You should be OK with it. The only problem you might have is that it is a 2 rail design. The PSU is rated for a max total of 22 amps distributed over 2 rails (max of 16 and 14 amps). With no power plug to the video card, you will not be able to pull more than 16 - 18 amps from the main power plug before the PSU shuts down. (This is one reason I prefer single rail power supplies even though it technically violates ATX2.xx specs.)

That should be enough, but it might not be. If the 6570 fits your budget, buy it and install it. Your first sign of inadequate power will be seemingly random reset/reboot cycles while you are playing games.
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a c 547 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 3:48:16 AM

Hardware Secrets' review is for the FSP300-60GHS and is not the same as the OP's FSP300-60THA.

There is more than twenty FSP300-60??? models and they all have different +12V rail capacities. Some models have only one +12V rail.

My educated guess for the FSP300-60THA, based on its specs from its Data Sheet, is a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 15 Amps.

The FSP300-60THA's Data Sheet provided by FSP states:

+3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 120W

+3.3 @ +5V & +12V1DC & +12V2DC total output not exceed 280W

There is also no PCI Express supplementary power connector.
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a c 291 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 4:15:38 AM

What is your budget and what games will you play with your PC?
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a b U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 5:43:24 AM

ko888 said:
Hardware Secrets' review is for the FSP300-60GHS and is not the same as the OP's FSP300-60THA.

There is more than twenty FSP300-60??? models and they all have different +12V rail capacities. Some models have only one +12V rail.

My educated guess for the FSP300-60THA, based on its specs from its Data Sheet, is a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 15 Amps.

The FSP300-60THA's Data Sheet provided by FSP states:

+3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 120W

+3.3 @ +5V & +12V1DC & +12V2DC total output not exceed 280W

There is also no PCI Express supplementary power connector.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 3, 2012 9:51:28 PM

Thanks for the help guys!


Ko: Good info on the PSU specs and the wattage draw of the card I mentioned.. I like that it only draws 38 watts but still weary about dropping it into a stock psu

JSC: Thanks for the explanation of single vs. double rail, didn't know that.

Sun: I am looking to spend as little as needed to have a reliable PSU and a graphics card that can run World of Warcraft on high (or so) with 60+ fps. Fairly easy to do, I assume.

Decided to upgrade the PSU, then drop in a card worthy of it..Radeon 6770 most likely. I hear it draws over 100 watts and needs a direct 6-pin connector. Can you folks check out the PSU's I have linked? They appear to meet my needs and budget but I'd like some feedback.

Thanks again!


Antec 430
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Enermax 450
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair 430
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I assume the 430 would be enough for the radeon 6770?
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a c 143 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 9:55:14 PM

Yes it is.

May i ask what resolution are you gaming at?
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May 3, 2012 10:10:33 PM

ilysaml said:
Yes it is.

May i ask what resolution are you gaming at?


Under my old Geforce 8600 GT (and, incidentally, my current integrated card, lol) I run it at just 1360x768.

Frankly, to me, it seems that higher resolutions just shrink the images and don't add any clarity/detail, so I stick with that. Perhaps under a better card I can move up.
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a c 143 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 10:16:23 PM

rbennett1701 said:
Frankly, to me, it seems that higher resolutions just shrink the images and don't add any clarity/detail, so I stick with that. Perhaps under a better card I can move up.

Well, that the case if you play Max Payne 2 on 1080p resolution :lol: 
Modern games are designed to run on very large resolution such as 5760X without sacrificing the quality of the textures.
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a c 547 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 10:18:38 PM

rbennett1701 said:
Thanks for the help guys!


Ko: Good info on the PSU specs and the wattage draw of the card I mentioned.. I like that it only draws 38 watts but still weary about dropping it into a stock psu

JSC: Thanks for the explanation of single vs. double rail, didn't know that.

Sun: I am looking to spend as little as needed to have a reliable PSU and a graphics card that can run World of Warcraft on high (or so) with 60+ fps. Fairly easy to do, I assume.

Decided to upgrade the PSU, then drop in a card worthy of it..Radeon 6770 most likely. I hear it draws over 100 watts and needs a direct 6-pin connector. Can you folks check out the PSU's I have linked? They appear to meet my needs and budget but I'd like some feedback.

Thanks again!


Antec 430
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Enermax 450
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair 430
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I assume the 430 would be enough for the radeon 6770?

For a system using a single Radeon HD 6770 graphics card AMD specifies a minimum of a 450 Watt or greater power supply. The power supply should also have a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 25 Amps or greater and have at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Total Continuous Amperage Available on the +12V Rail(s) is the most important factor.

The Antec EarthWatts Green Series 430W (EA-430D Green), with its combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 32 Amps and with one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single Radeon HD 6770.

The Corsair Builder Series CX430 V2 (CMPSU-430CXV2), with its combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 28 Amps and with one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector, is sufficient to power your system configuration with a single Radeon HD 6770.

The ENERMAX NAXN 450W (ENP450AST), with its combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 30 Amps and with one 6-pin and one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single Radeon HD 6770.
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May 3, 2012 10:31:42 PM

Best answer selected by rbennett1701.
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May 3, 2012 10:33:56 PM

Awesome! Thanks!

One last thing if you don't mind: You seem to be adding the 2 rails together and counting them as equal to a single rail. If 2 and 1 rail set ups are counted in the same fashion, then what is the real difference between them?

Is 2 more stable? Is 1 more powerful? Is it entirely irrelevant?
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a c 547 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 10:53:57 PM

rbennett1701 said:
Awesome! Thanks!

One last thing if you don't mind: You seem to be adding the 2 rails together and counting them as equal to a single rail. If 2 and 1 rail set ups are counted in the same fashion, then what is the real difference between them?

Is 2 more stable? Is 1 more powerful? Is it entirely irrelevant?

A reputable power supply will have a published combined +12 Volt continuous current rating and that is what I used for the Antec and ENERMAX models so I didn't just add the two rails together.

True +12V multiple rails will have protections (e.g. OCP - Over Current Protection, OVP - Over Voltage Protection, SCP - Short Circuit Protection, OPP - Over Power Protection, ..., etc.) available on each of the +12V rails. The amperage values you see on the label for each +12V rail is what the rail's maximum current draw is suppose to be limited to.

Take the ENERMAX NAXN 450W (ENP450AST) for example:

+12V1@21A
+12V2@18A
combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 30 Amps

If you're drawing 21A from +12V1 you cannot draw more than 9A from +12V2.

If you're drawing 18A from +12V2 you cannot draw more than 12A from +12V1.

The total 30 Amps is distributed between the two rails and cannot be exceeded because that is all that the power supply is capable of delivering.

Multiple +12V rails does not guarantee stability. Properly designed multiple +12V rail power supplies are safer.
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a c 271 U Graphics card
May 3, 2012 11:05:46 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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