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I3 3220

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November 2, 2012 2:53:42 PM

hi im wondering im think of getting a i3220 122 dollars plus a ASUS P8H67-M PRO, LGA1155, New B3 revision for 50bucks and im getting a hd 7850 soon and im wondering will be a good setup

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November 2, 2012 3:00:47 PM

As a general rule don't match up a "6" series board with a 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processor unless you are upgrading from a 2nd generation Intel Core processor. The reason why is that the "6" series boards (like this Asus P8H67-M Pro) need a Bios update to support the 3rd generation Intel Core processors. (This board needs bios 3702 in order to support the Intel Core i3-3220). So if you can get a 2nd gen Intel Core to update the Bios go for it but otherwise try to pick up the H77 chipset version of this board.
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November 2, 2012 3:07:41 PM

what would be a good board then
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November 2, 2012 3:32:11 PM

or would it be better i went with a i3 2120
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November 2, 2012 3:54:57 PM

The i3-3220 is a good CPU. You can match it up with the Asrock H77M MATX and not have to flash the bios like IntelEnthusiast said.

Edit: I don't know if you'd see that much of a performance increase over your current CPU though. It would be an upgrade, but I don't know if you'd actually "see" it.
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November 2, 2012 4:01:25 PM

will my old phemon was not a it was althon classed as a phemon
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November 2, 2012 4:02:17 PM

The Asus P8H77-M Pro is a good board but I might look at a board like the ASRock Z77 Pro4-M might be a good board for you for both the Intel® Core™ i3-2120 or the Intel Core i3-3220 (better of the two).
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November 2, 2012 4:06:37 PM

well im can get the i3 2120 for $120 or the i3 3220 for $122
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November 2, 2012 4:11:41 PM

which one should i get
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November 2, 2012 4:15:24 PM

Get the newer one (3220) for all of $2 more.... not much for newer tech

Is this another of these threads though? The past 7 days you have asked similar questions on everything from an i5 through to a Phenom II 965BE (and others between).
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November 2, 2012 4:17:47 PM

yea i want to do a intel build
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November 2, 2012 4:20:23 PM

You do understand that using your 550ti you will see no real gaming difference between what you have now and an i3.

If gaming is your concern spend that cash on a better GPU to see actual results
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November 2, 2012 4:20:37 PM

and i have sold my amd rig
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November 2, 2012 4:21:58 PM

im getting a hd 7850
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November 2, 2012 4:26:41 PM

i3 would go with that, but I would get an FX 6300 if you want Intel save for an i5 rather than buying an i3 which is a locked multi, dual core design. Games are already stating quad cores as recommended requirements the i3 will lose relevence faster (in my opinion) than the budget AMD offerings.
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November 2, 2012 4:29:20 PM

intel core i3-3220
asus p8h77-m pro
hd 7850
if this is the build you are planning then its a pretty good build
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November 2, 2012 4:30:40 PM

ok would the i5 3330 be ok then
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November 2, 2012 4:31:16 PM

mohit9206 said:
intel core i3-3220
asus p8h77-m pro
hd 7850
if this is the build you are planning then its a pretty good build


yea im planing it
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November 2, 2012 4:46:40 PM

skitz9417 said:
ok would the i5 3330 be ok then

even the cheapest i5 sandy or ivy bridge will beat the best i3 dual core
so if you can manage a cheap last gen i5 like an i5-2300 with a cheap Z77 mobo like asrock extreme 4 would be much better investment than an i3
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November 2, 2012 4:54:43 PM

wr6133 said:
i3 would go with that, but I would get an FX 6300 if you want Intel save for an i5 rather than buying an i3 which is a locked multi, dual core design,

Most i5 are locked as well so that does not really count as a disadvantage.

Jumping from i3-3220 to i5-3470 on a b75/h77 board costs around $50. Jumping from i5-3470 + b75/h77 to i5-3570k + z77 adds almost a whole $100 on top of that unless you can get the Microcenter deal. Not everyone is interested in paying nearly $150 extra for the sake of going with an i5k that they do not actually need.
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November 2, 2012 4:57:59 PM

sry i live in australia
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November 2, 2012 5:12:55 PM

InvalidError said:
Most i5 are locked as well so that does not really count as a disadvantage.

Jumping from i3-3220 to i5-3470 on a b75/h77 board costs around $50. Jumping from i5-3470 + b75/h77 to i5-3570k + z77 adds almost a whole $100 on top of that unless you can get the Microcenter deal. Not everyone is interested in paying nearly $150 extra for the sake of going with an i5k that they do not actually need.


To be more clear I see the locked multi on the i3 as a disadvantage not compared to a K series i5 but as a disadvantage in that as that CPU loses relevance (which will be before any i5 locked or not) you cant try whacking up the clock speed to make up for it. Anyone building a gamer with an i3 now I think should accept that they are building a platform that is going to lose relevance faster than other options.

Now before the fanbois come and cut my above in to little misquoted parts let me say the above is Just my Opinion and view
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November 2, 2012 5:17:28 PM

so i5 3330 and tht motherboard is fine?
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November 2, 2012 8:08:49 PM

wr6133 said:
To be more clear I see the locked multi on the i3 as a disadvantage not compared to a K series i5 but as a disadvantage in that as that CPU loses relevance (which will be before any i5 locked or not) you cant try whacking up the clock speed to make up for it.

The $150 difference between i3/h77 and i5k/z77 covers a large chunk of the upgrade cost for that possibly earlier future upgrade due to hypothetical premature loss of relevance. At that future point, you are likely going to be able to get an even more powerful upgrade than your original target that costs little more or possibly even slightly less than your leftover.

So paying more today for extra features you have no short/medium-term need for to (maybe) extend the life of a system a few more years is not necessarily the most cost-effective route. Even if you buy with 'futureproofing' in mind, there is no guarantee that future hardware won't have a must-have feature that will make you want to upgrade prematurely anyhow.

The best upgrade strategy IMO is to buy when immediate needs require it and pick components to meet needs for the (reasonable) foreseeable future such as 3-5 years. I do not expect many more mainstream games and applications to make much use of quad-thread/core CPUs within that time span simply because user-interactive processes are notoriously difficult to thread in an effective, efficient and sensible manner.

Sure, there is a trend. But a handful more games and applications managing to implement meaningful fine threading each year out of thousands are not going to make or break things for dual-core/quad-thread CPUs any time soon for most people.
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