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Plugging Question

Last response: in Components
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November 4, 2012 5:44:16 AM

I just plugged my router into an extension cord then my display in the computer suddenly went down for about a second then went back just like normal. I doesn't always happen but when you plug something that is connected to the computer(router, speaker, etc.) the computer display turns off for a second. The computer is plugged in the AVR together with the monitor and the rest are plugged else where. Router is plugged on a different extension cord than that of the speaker, printer and modem. The computer is fairly new and I wanted to ask if it would affect something in the long run. I recently posted this in another section but no one responded but I think this is the right section.

More about : plugging question

November 4, 2012 6:05:03 AM

I really don't know what i'm dealing with here, have you tried testing with another power supply ? also maybe if you remove the monitor from the AVR ?
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November 4, 2012 8:33:14 PM

Haven't tried anything yet. Okay, let me simplify that. My computer is plugged and when I plug in something that is connected to it like router, display will turn off for a second then comes back like normal. It's like there's no electricity for a second but that's what I think. Can you/somebody explain what happens in this case?
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November 5, 2012 12:59:34 AM

Try connecting the pc to another extension cord or wall socket. If that solves the problem then you should get a new extension cord. It could be that the device that you connect to the extension cord draws some extra power on startup, and is causing other devices connected to the extension cord to lose power.

Hope this answers your question
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November 5, 2012 5:58:27 AM

The pc is connected to an AVR together with the monitor while the router is connected to an extension cord with nothing else but itself. Both the extension cord and the AVR are connected to different wall sockets of the same room. I also thought when connecting the device it makes the others lose power but the pc and the router are not connected in the same extension cord/AVR.

Doesn't always happen but would try to change the arrangement on how things are plugged. Can this have bad effects on the pc if this would continue to happen?
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November 5, 2012 6:03:08 AM

Never plug or unplug anything connected to the Pc whilst it is powered on, with the exception of Usb's or headphones/Mic,
and yes, bad things will happen if you do
Moto
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November 5, 2012 6:03:52 AM

hapibanana21 said:
The pc is connected to an AVR together with the monitor while the router is connected to an extension cord with nothing else but itself. Both the extension cord and the AVR are connected to different wall sockets of the same room. I also thought when connecting the device it makes the others lose power but the pc and the router are not connected in the same extension cord/AVR.

Doesn't always happen but would try to change the arrangement on how things are plugged. What would happen if this would continue to happen? Can this have a bad effect on the pc?

What is probably happening is that when you plug something in the pc the pc uses a bit more power than before and that extra power first comes out of the monitor usage so he will blackout for a second, that would be the AVR fault, you should remove the monitor from there or the pc entirely, you will usually need a good quality AVR so that kind of problem won't happen.
The bad effect here could be on the monitor running out of power every time that happens while also being annoying but other than that your pc should be fine.
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November 5, 2012 11:19:48 AM

Well if one device is causing the others to lose power, you could get a ups battery backup for your pc. It will protect your pc from drops in power, as it will provide battery power when a short blackout occurs.
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November 5, 2012 1:03:53 PM

Thanks everyone! So the pc is fine whenever this happens, right? Anyway, it doesn't happen again and if it does I guess I should connect the pc/monitor to another socket or go buy another AVR/UPS.
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November 5, 2012 1:29:59 PM

No problem, A UPS is a worthwhile investment, as it will protect your pc from spikes, drops in voltage, and if power runs out you always have a some time to finish your work, and shut everything down securely. It may not be the best thing for your pc to lose power briefly, but it should be Ok as long as this does not happen again. If it keeps on happening I suggest trying to get a UPS or fixing it some other way.
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November 12, 2012 3:01:39 AM

I'm very sorry to revive this thread but if I'm buying another UPS/AVR what VA/Watts should I look for? I have a z77 board with i5 and gtx 660 ti. Also considering that I have the monitor + wireless phone charger plugged.
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November 12, 2012 3:17:45 PM

Well as for brands, I would get a UPS from APC they make some nice power devices. Also make sure the UPS can handle the wattage. APC has a configurator to help you out with that. Just make sure that the UPS has a greater wattage (by say 150-200watts) then your psu, and that should be enough to compensate for the power efficiency of the PSU, and the monitor and phone.
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November 13, 2012 3:20:29 AM

I have a 800w PSU so I kind of need a UPS of 1000 or 1500, right? Also, does UPS really work like AVR just with the feature of having a power during power outages? It says "Premium Battery Backup with Surge Protection for High Performance Electronics and Computers" but I just wanted to make sure.
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November 13, 2012 9:45:11 AM

If you take a a UPS with 1500va, from a good brand like APC, or Belkin you should be fine. 1500va is about 900watts, and that should be enough, as you are unlikely to have your psu on 100%load, but you should double check on your power requirements. I have a 750watt psu, with two monitors on a 1500va ups, and it works fine. It protects against voltage spikes, and drops, and of course provides battery backup.
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November 13, 2012 9:45:46 AM

hapibanana21 said:
I have a 800w PSU so I kind of need a UPS of 1000 or 1500, right? Also, does UPS really work like AVR just with the feature of having a power during power outages? It says "Premium Battery Backup with Surge Protection for High Performance Electronics and Computers" but I just wanted to make sure.

Yes, 1500va should be enough, but notice how thats in VA, not in watts, so be careful when shopping for a ups, so that you don't accidently get one that doesn't provide enough power to your system.
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November 13, 2012 10:02:42 AM

So how do I know how much is that equivalent to watts? I thought it was the same.
EDIT: Just found out APC's 1500VA UPS are only about 800w-850w. Should I just get an AVR with about 2000VA or should I just connected my monitor somewhere else? If ever I'm going to connect my monitor I'm gonna have to use a transformer because of sockets here being 220v and the monitor being 110v. Can I use extension cord to connect my transformer?
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