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Gaming PC worth the Price?

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May 6, 2012 5:21:26 PM

AMD PHENOM II X6 1100T Processor 3.30GHZ
16.0 GIG Ram
GeForce GTX 550 Ti 4095MB vid ram
1 Terabyte HDD
Windows 7 Pro 64 bit
ASUS M5A99X EVO AM3+ AMD 990X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

Price - $500

Couple requirements for the computer:

Capable to Dual Monitor
Run Guild Wars 2 max settings at Hi res and Good FPS

More about : gaming worth price

May 6, 2012 5:42:49 PM

It's about equal, what size is the PSU? Does it come with a mouse, keyboard, speakers, monitor, printer? It will meet those requirements.
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May 6, 2012 5:46:03 PM

I wouldn't buy that computer for gaming.

If you don't want to overclock, and are trying to save money but have it last a while, you could buy the i5-2400, 8 gb memory, gtx 560 ti. If you want to do a little better, the i5-2500k and the gtx 570/580.

I doubt you'll need 16 GB ram unless you specifically know you do. I'm on an i5-2400, 3 GB ram, dual monitor display for work (legal/ms office programs) and it never lags. My gaming computer is on 8 GB ram and I've never seen it go past 4.5 unless I'm messing with virtual machines.
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May 6, 2012 5:57:53 PM

Couple of points:
1. 16GB of RAM might be overkill for most people. 8GB is the sweet spot these days in terms of requirements and price.
2. Phenom 1100T, while a capable CPU, is probably not the best for high-FPS gaming. AMD processors often hold back the graphic cards, which is a shame. You'll be better served by a lower-end Core i5 that despite its multiplier lock, serves very good frames.
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May 6, 2012 6:03:33 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS M5A99X EVO AM3+ AMD 990X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

Is the Motherboard if needed to be stated.

This is a prebuilt computer. Someone is selling it to me for the price above. I want to know if its worth that price and will it meet my requirements stated above.
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May 6, 2012 6:05:01 PM

eddieroolz said:
Couple of points:
1. 16GB of RAM might be overkill for most people. 8GB is the sweet spot these days in terms of requirements and price.
2. Phenom 1100T, while a capable CPU, is probably not the best for high-FPS gaming. AMD processors often hold back the graphic cards, which is a shame. You'll be better served by a lower-end Core i5 that despite its multiplier lock, serves very good frames.



1. as he states, 8gb of ram is plenty for gaming.
2. as he states amd sucks for fps & gaming, go i5 intel
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May 6, 2012 6:13:27 PM

16GB is overkill why would you need that???

My computer has 4GB ram and I have 0 problems. When I upgrade I will get 8GB and that is plenty.

Also AMD Sucks. Intel has shown to be better on everything.
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May 6, 2012 6:13:50 PM

imonlymyself said:
1. as he states, 8gb of ram is plenty for gaming.
2. as he states amd sucks for fps & gaming, go i5 intel



Why are you quoting something that doesnt answer the question.

*Will it max Guild Wars 2 at high res with smooth FPS?

*Is the price accurate on the computer?

you are under the assumption I am building this computer myself. I agree 16gb ram is overkill. I didnt build this computer a coworker/friend did. I am just asking if this will meet what I want to do with the computer. If I had the time/money then sure I would love to build my own and customize it to exactly what I want it to do. But im not asking that.
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May 6, 2012 6:14:56 PM

zyzz said:
16GB is overkill why would you need that???

My computer has 4GB ram and I have 0 problems. When I upgrade I will get 8GB and that is plenty.

Also AMD Sucks. Intel has shown to be better on everything.


So I should avoid this computer at all costs because its AMD? regardless if it does meet what I want to do? AGAIN if I wanted to change someone on the computer then I would but it is prebuilt. I didnt pick these parts
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May 6, 2012 6:19:50 PM

im gunna go help people that arent retarded and want help.
have a good day sir
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May 6, 2012 6:21:04 PM

imonlymyself said:
im gunna go help people that arent retarded and want help.
have a good day sir



LOL? I am asking 2 very straight forward questions. But you are bashing the prebuilt computer as if I made it myself.
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May 6, 2012 6:23:56 PM

perplexityx said:
So I should avoid this computer at all costs because its AMD? regardless if it does meet what I want to do? AGAIN if I wanted to change someone on the computer then I would but it is prebuilt. I didnt pick these parts

why don't you build it yourself. It's cheaper and better.

Where are you buying this prebuilt from anyway?
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May 6, 2012 6:27:59 PM

zyzz said:
why don't you build it yourself. It's cheaper and better.

Where are you buying this prebuilt from anyway?




I am buying this computer from a coworker who is going to the navy and just wont be able to use it. If this is a good deal and will be able to fullfill my requirements then I want to jump on this. Of course I would love to build my own, but with what people have been quoting its gonna be 7-850 to get to what I want to do. And if a PC a friend is selling at 500 can do the same, then I want to get it. I am not too knowledgeable with brands and I see AMD gets a lot of hate. There is NOTHING i can do to change how this is built. All I can do is buy it how it is and thats why I am asking you more knowledgeable people if its worth the price and can do what I want it to do
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 6:31:02 PM

This computer is not worth $500 as a gaming build. The graphics is not good enough for that price.

The AMD CPUs such as the 1090T are better for highly threaded work than they are for gaming. However, they are good enough for gaming up until a Radeon 6870 or Radeon 6950. Going beyond those two cards will show how the AMD CPUs can provide bottlenecks. However, whether or not an AMD CPU is viable varies widely between games at different resolutions and quality settings and AA. Intel is generally better for gaming, but sometimes AMD is just as good. However, there are not many times at all where AMD is better. That is where most of the hate comes from. For high end gaming machines, Intel is almost a necessity.
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May 6, 2012 6:32:27 PM

Thank you. What video card would you recommend to bump this up? Could a better video card I buy make it worth the price?
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May 6, 2012 6:35:02 PM

perplexityx said:
LOL? I am asking 2 very straight forward questions. But you are bashing the prebuilt computer as if I made it myself.



yeh i know, im back. couldnt resist. since you dont understand what we meant by what we said. I'll put it in terms you may understand. for $500 that is a PIECE OFCRAP. or try this term, WASTE OF MONEY. i put up 2 links of rigs that are far, FAR better for only 300 bones more
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May 6, 2012 6:35:09 PM

dude no way I would buy that. Plus think about the future.

Build it yourself.
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 6:35:21 PM

For a $500 machine, I would recommend a Radeon 6850. If your friend here can drop the price down to $425 or $440ish, then it would be a decent deal even with the 550 TI.
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 6:38:05 PM

imonlymyself said:
yeh i know, im back. couldnt resist. since you dont understand what we meant by what we said. I'll put it in terms you may understand. for $500 that is a PIECE OFCRAP. or try this term, WASTE OF MONEY. i put up 2 links of rigs that are far, FAR better for only 300 bones more


You don't know what you're talking about nearly as well as you think that you do. If the price is simply dropped by $60 to $100, then it's a decent build for the money. The AMD 1100T is not slow enough to bottleneck the GTX 550 TI at all. It's not even a piece of crap for the money, just not optimal.

The point of this seems to not be an expensive computer. If you want to be a fail of a high end elitist, then please, don't bother someone for not wanting to spend that much money.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This machine would have nearly identical gaming performance to the machine listed by the OP. That's an even worse deal. The 7750 and the GTX 550 TI are similarly performing graphics cards.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This one is a moderate improvement over the machine listed by the OP. Definitely also not worth the money. The CPU in this computer is even slower than the CPU from the machine listed by the OP and the graphics is only one tier above that machine.
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May 6, 2012 6:39:47 PM

Ok a different question. If I were to build my own computer. How much would I expect to spend to Max Guild Wars 2 and future games at that? 1980 res
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May 6, 2012 6:43:08 PM

Guild Wars 2 graphics are not very impressive lol.

You want games to look at graphics... BF3, Skyrim, Metro 2033, etc those are good benchmark tests.

Like I said I would spend decent money so it LASTS.

My current computer is 5 years old and has lasted. Now slowly, slowly newer games I have to run at medium or medium/low for high FPS.

Spend $800, which is cheaper than when I bought this computer, for something than can run everything on HIGH some ULTRA.
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May 6, 2012 6:43:47 PM

blazorthon said:
You don't know what you're talking about nearly as well as you think that you do. If the price is simply dropped by $60 to $100, then it's a decent build for the money. The AMD 1100T is not slow enough to bottleneck the GTX 550 TI at all. It's not even a piece of crap for the money, just not optimal.

The point of this seems to not be an expensive computer. If you want to be a high end elitist, then please, don't bother someone for not wanting to spend that much money.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This machine would have nearly identical gaming performance to the machine listed by the OP. That's an even worse deal. The 7750 and the GTX 550 TI are similarly performing graphics cards.


I feel like if im going to shell out 800 dollars for a computer. I would rather it be my own build. Dont get me wrong I am trying to take the easy way out here, but I dont want to jump on this and be dissappointed that it cant max Guild Wars 2
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May 6, 2012 6:46:09 PM

zyzz said:
Guild Wars 2 graphics are not very impressive lol.

You want games to look at graphics... BF3, Skyrim, Metro 2033, etc those are good benchmark tests.

Like I said I would spend decent money so it LASTS.

My current computer is 5 years old and has lasted. Now slowly, slowly newer games I have to run at medium or medium/low for high FPS.

Spend $800, which is cheaper than when I bought this computer, for something than can run everything on HIGH some ULTRA.



I know those games are good benchmark tests but I dont play those games. Guild Wars 2 would be the most graphically/FPS related game I would play. Along side League of Legends and Diablo 3.
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May 6, 2012 6:47:25 PM

don't be dumb and buy a prebuilt.

I have built my last 3 computers, but I have bought prebuilts as well.

Computers have significantly dropped in price the last 5 years.

You can buy something now for $800-$900 that can max everything game. Only somethings can't be at ultra if you use super high resolution.

This computer I bought 5 years ago could run all games on high, not max, but high. Not the highest resolution either. It was about $1200 after taxes.
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 6:50:07 PM

perplexityx said:
I feel like if im going to shell out 800 dollars for a computer. I would rather it be my own build. Dont get me wrong I am trying to take the easy way out here, but I dont want to jump on this and be dissappointed that it cant max Guild Wars 2


I prefer DIY builds too. If $500 is your budget, then I would grab an i3-2120 with an $80 H67 motherboard, 8GB of DDR3-1333 or DDR3-1600 (Corsair or G.Skill would be the best memory brands), a 1 1TB or 2TB hard drive, and a Radeon 7770 (XFX, HIS, and SAPPHIRE are usually the best brands for Radeon cards). It has nearly identical performance to the 6850 that I recommended earlier and is similar in price, but uses a lot less power and would thus leave a smaller mark on your electricity bill.

Throw in a 500w PSU (Antec, Corsair, or Seasonic are the best brands here) that is either an 80+ or 80+ Bronze for another $50 to $60 and a cheap case that costs between $40 and $60, and you should be good to go for the computer.
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May 6, 2012 6:51:45 PM

even if you play those games now, you might change your mind in the future.

Get something that will last...

Watch for deals.
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May 6, 2012 6:58:47 PM

zyzz said:
even if you play those games now, you might change your mind in the future.

Get something that will last...

Watch for deals.


i understand what you are saying
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May 6, 2012 6:59:23 PM

hey id suggest build your own, but the OP seem like he was more into prebuilts. thats why i suggested other prebuilts. and those prebuilts are far Superior to the 1 he mentioned. so blazor i do know what im talking about. thank you very much.
BTW, i never said anything about bottlenecking. so idk where that came from.

that rig u just set up for him doesnt really get him far into the future where he's gunna need to spend more money again. he's far better off spending a bit more now. which if he prebuilds, he can do better than the links i gave
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 7:06:21 PM

imonlymyself said:
hey id suggest build your own, but the OP seem like he was more into prebuilts. thats why i suggested other prebuilts. and those prebuilts are far Superior to the 1 he mentioned. so blazor i do know what im talking about. thank you very much.
BTW, i never said anything about bottlenecking. so idk where that came from.

that rig u just set up for him doesnt really get him far into the future where he's gunna need to spend more money again. he's far better off spending a bit more now. which if he prebuilds, he can do better than the links i gave


You said that the CPU was too slow, so I replied by saying that is is not slow enough to bottleneck.

The builds that you listed aren't superior. The first one has the RAdeon 7750 graphics which performs about as good as the graphics in the OP's listed machine (GTX 550 TI is actually a little faster, but not enough for it to matter). The second one had the GTX 560 which is a little better than the 550 TI.

The rig that I mentioned is more than enough. The i3s can handle graphics up to and including the Radeon 6950 and 7850 and the GTX 570 without slowing down anything. The i3 is a better gaming processor than the AMD CPUs are, especially the FX-6100 in the second machine that you listed. The 7770 is superior to the 550 TI and is right behind the GTX 560.

If a more expensive graphics card is wanted, then there is the 7850, GTX 560 TI 2GB, and Radeon 6950 2GB to consider. The only part that would need to be upgraded in the next two years is the graphics and all that would need is a second 7770 for CF and it's good to go for a few more years.

The 7770 has the most performance for the money at this budget. If the budget can be stretched, then I recommend the Radeon 7850. Keep in mind that although the 7770 is beaten slightly be the GTX 560, it can be overclocked far beyond the 560 (even if the 560 id overclocked) and no matter how far you overclock it, it will still use about half of the 560's power usage.

So, the CPU is not a problem until you go beyond the 7850. It won't slow anything down and is faster than than both the Phenom II x6 1100T and the FX-6100 for gaming. The i5-3570 and it's K edition do beat it significantly, but that only matters if you have a graphics system that needs the performance (IE at least a GTX 580 or Radeon 7870 or Radeon 7950).

The 8GB memory kit is enough for the next four to five years.

The CPU should last that long as well.

The graphics will need an upgrade, but ALL graphics should be upgraded at least once every two to four years, unless you bought something that is far more than necessary for what you did when you first bought it. If in the future the graphics is beyond the i3's capability (only the i5 machine that you listed does not have this problem, all other machines thus far do), then at that time, an i5 or i7 would be dirt cheap and would be more than enough of an upgrade to handle everything up to like triple or quad GTX 680s and 7970s if you overclock it.

Everything about my build is more than adequate for the next four to six years with a graphics upgrade within two to three years. If you have a problem with it, then instead of saying that you don't like it, please point out what you don't like about it. The links that you gave had the same problem, except even worse.

EDIT: Your prebuilt builds didn't suck because they were prebuilds, they sucked because they have crap graphics performance for their prices. I can look through prebuilds as well, but I simply replied to a comment about prebuilds with a good one. Keep in mind that a lot of places will build a computer for you if you know the parts that you want.
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May 6, 2012 7:24:55 PM

blazorthon said:
You said that the CPU was too slow, so I replied by saying that is is not slow enough to bottleneck.

The builds that you listed aren't superior. The first one has the RAdeon 7750 graphics which performs about as good as the graphics in the OP's listed machine (GTX 550 TI is actually a little faster, but not enough for it to matter). The second one had the GTX 560 which is a little better than the 550 TI.

The rig that I mentioned is more than enough. The i3s can handle graphics up to and including the Radeon 6950 and 7850 and the GTX 570 without slowing down anything. The i3 is a better gaming processor than the AMD CPUs are, especially the FX-6100 in the second machine that you listed. The 7770 is superior to the 550 TI and is right behind the GTX 560.

If a more expensive graphics card is wanted, then there is the 7850, GTX 560 TI 2GB, and Radeon 6950 2GB to consider. The only part that would need to be upgraded in the next two years is the graphics and all that would need is a second 7770 for CF and it's good to go for a few more years.

The 7770 has the most performance for the money at this budget. If the budget can be stretched, then I recommend the Radeon 7850. Keep in mind that although the 7770 is beaten slightly be the GTX 560, it can be overclocked far beyond the 560 (even if the 560 id overclocked) and no matter how far you overclock it, it will still use about half of the 560's power usage.

So, the CPU is not a problem until you go beyond the 7850. It won't slow anything down and is faster than than both the Phenom II x6 1100T and the FX-6100 for gaming. The i5-3570 and it's K edition do beat it significantly, but that only matters if you have a graphics system that needs the performance (IE at least a GTX 580 or Radeon 7870 or Radeon 7950).

The 8GB memory kit is enough for the next four to five years.

The CPU should last that long as well.

The graphics will need an upgrade, but ALL graphics should be upgraded at least once every two to four years, unless you bought something that is far more than necessary for what you did when you first bought it. If in the future the graphics is beyond the i3's capability (only the i5 machine that you listed does not have this problem, all other machines thus far do), then at that time, an i5 or i7 would be dirt cheap and would be more than enough of an upgrade to handle everything up to like triple or quad GTX 680s and 7970s if you overclock it.

Everything about my build is more than adequate for the next four to six years with a graphics upgrade within two to three years. If you have a problem with it, then instead of saying that you don't like it, please point out what you don't like about it. The links that you gave had the same problem, except even worse.

EDIT: Your prebuilt builds didn't suck because they were prebuilds, they sucked because they have crap graphics performance for their prices. I can look through prebuilds as well, but I simply replied to a comment about prebuilds with a good one. Keep in mind that a lot of places will build a computer for you if you know the parts that you want.


Which prebuilt are you referring to?
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 7:46:37 PM

perplexityx said:
Which prebuilt are you referring to?


Where at? It wad a kinda big post. Could you put where the reference that I made that you are asking about in bold or italics?
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May 6, 2012 7:47:50 PM

blazorthon said:
The rig that I mentioned is more than enough. The i3s can handle graphics up to and including the Radeon 6950 and 7850 and the GTX 570 without slowing down anything. The i3 is a better gaming processor than the AMD CPUs are, especially the FX-6100 in the second machine that you listed. The 7770 is superior to the 550 TI and is right behind the GTX 560.


This one here what were you talking about?
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 7:58:12 PM

perplexityx said:
This one here what were you talking about?


Ahh. I was justifying my choices for DIY build against the machines that imonlymyself listed and against the build that the OP's acquaintance is selling.

I'm going to look for prebuilts with similar quality if the OP wants to, but OP said he/she was considering a DIY so that's what I listed. I'm looking for prebuilts with similar components (or better). Low end prebuilts can often be found at decent prices (unlike the unbalanced, overpriced builds mentioned by imonlymyself), so it shouldn't be difficult.

I'm still saying that if the OP wants to buy the friend's PC, ask for a discount. It's worth that much money, just not as a gaming machine. The Phenom II x6 1100T is not really a gaming oriented processor. For highly threaded work (gaming is not highly threaded), it surpasses the i5s in some workloads and is between the performance of the six core FX CPUs and the eight core FX CPUs (the six core FXs are right with the i5s or even jsut slightly behind them, depending on the workload) most of the time.

If this computer was bought for a low budget highly threaded performance machine, then it would reasonably beat out everything from Intel up until the $650 to $800 budget range. However, like I said, it's not a gaming computer. A quad core Phenom II is better for gaming than a six core Phenom II and would have been cheaper.
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May 6, 2012 8:06:18 PM

blazorthon said:
Ahh. I was justifying my choices for DIY build against the machines that imonlymyself listed and against the build that the OP's acquaintance is selling.

I'm going to look for prebuilts with similar quality if the OP wants to, but OP said he/she was considering a DIY so that's what I listed. I'm looking for prebuilts with similar components (or better). Low end prebuilts can often be found at decent prices (unlike the unbalanced, overpriced builds mentioned by imonlymyself), so it shouldn't be difficult.

I'm still saying that if the OP wants to buy the friend's PC, ask for a discount. It's worth that much money, just not as a gaming machine. The Phenom II x6 100T is not really a gaming oriented processor. For highly threaded work (gaming is not highly threaded), it surpasses the i5s in some workloads and is between the performance of the six core FX CPUs and the eight core FX CPUs (the six core FXs are right with the i5s or even jsut slightly behind them, depending on the workload) most of the time.

If this computer was bought for a low budget highly threaded performance machine, then it would reasonably beat out everything from Intel up until the $650 to $800 budget range. However, like I said, it's not a gaming computer. A quad core Phenom II is better for gaming than a six core Phenom II and would have been cheaper.



That would be great thanks
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May 6, 2012 8:11:07 PM

OS: Windows 7 home premium (64 bit)
Processor: AMD Phenom II x6 1090t 3.7Ghz Overclock
Motherboard: ASUS Crosshair IV Formula AM3
Hard drives: OCZ- Agility 2 (60 GBytes), WDC WD5000AAK-00E4A0 (465 GBytes)
Video Card: (CROSSFIRE) 1x Sapphire Radeon 6850 (Watercooled), 1x HIS IceQ X Turbo AMD Radeon HD 6850 both 1024MB GDDR5 PCIe 2.1 x16 Video Card 6850s in Crossfire, Swiftech Universal gpu water block.
Memory: 2x 2GBytes DominatorGT DDR 2000, 2x 4 GBytes XMS3 corsiar DDR3 2000. (AIR COOLED) 12GB total.
Power Supply: Corsair Series 850 Watt ATX 12 V Modular Power Supply
Case: Antec Lanboy Blue
Cooling: Corsair Swiftech H20-220 Edge Liquid Cooling Kit, Apogee XT Intel Water Block. 12 120mm fans LED.
CD drive: LG GH22LP21 22x Internal IDE Super-Multi Drive with LightScribe Direct Disc Labeling OEM


How would this be for around 800-850
would this be able to do what I want to do?
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 6, 2012 8:12:36 PM

typo, meant to say 1100T (although it might be obvious, I'll say it anyway and correct it in my post) where I said 100T.

You're welcome.
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May 6, 2012 10:38:29 PM

any advice on that last computer
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 7, 2012 12:20:56 AM

The Phenom IIs are okay with a single 6850, but two of them are probably more than the Phenom II CPUs can handle. You should be fine if you overclock that 1090T to 4GHz instead of 3.7GHz, although it probably wouldn't be a big difference. I just happen to have a computer with a 1090T at 4GHz (it's for VMs, not gaming) and it runs very well for a cheap computer.

Mixing two or more RAM kits is not recommended, especially with high end memory kits. 8GB is more than enough for gaming and going over 8GB will not make a difference, so just stick with the 2x4GB kit and don't use the 2x2GB kit. The 2x2 kit would not make a difference for performance (assuming that the motherboard even works if you mix the two kits) and would be needlessly stressing the memory controller on the CPU.

I'm not a fan of water cooling unless you are going for extreme overclocks. It's a lot more work to set up than air cooling and it doesn't help much more than air, despite the extra work and cost associated with it.

Where are you getting these parts? Do you already have them, or your friend(s) have them and you'rte getting the parts from them, or are you going to buy these from a store or website?

For that much money, it is a pretty darn good build. However, I'm not a fan of Radeon 6800 Crossfire because it is known as one of the most micro-stutter and variable FPS ridden graphics configurations around these days. Some games, it will be excellent. Some others, it will suck. These 6850s also only have 1GB of VRAM when they should have 2GB per GPU for Crossfire, or else they will not be long-lasting (some games already use up to and sometimes even beyond 1GB, aka 1024MB, at 1080p. This will only get worse as newer, heavier games come out that stress the VRAM more and more and more. VRAM capacity bottlenecks are the worst of them all because when you get one, instead of a gradual decline in performance, performance drops like a rock).

If those 6850 1GBs were switched out with two 7770 2GB or at least two 6850 2GB cards, water cooled or not, then I would approve of the build. For Crossfire and SLI, each GPU still only has the amount of memory that they have in single GPU setups. Basically, even a quad 6870 Crossfire configuration with only 1GB of VRAM per GPU (this can only be done with two Radeon 6870X2 cards, not four 6870s) will still only have 1GB of effective VRAM capacity, not 4GB. The same problem applies to dual GPU configurations such as the one that you have here.

It's a great build for 1680x1050 or 1600x900 or a similar resolution where the VRAM would not be a problem. Just don't expect 1080p to run on this very well with the newest games unless you lower the AA or quality settings a little.

Granted, none of the games that you said you want to play would be particularly graphics intensive, so it probably wouldn't be a problem in the near future and only in the long term.

Overall, it's a good build for the money. I would prefer two 7770s over two 6850s, but that's me. If it's already built, then my complaints on the water cooling are null. I would prefer a larger capacity SSD, but a 60GB SSD is still FAR better than no SSD.

Sorry that it took me so long, I had a long drive to make and just got back.
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May 7, 2012 12:41:12 AM

That helped out slot actually. This is another prebuilt that I'm looking at. Another friend finally emailed me the setup. I'm leaning on getting it instead of the first one. So you recommended the FBI cards instead of what's in there. Can you provide. More information or links to some options?
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 7, 2012 1:15:45 AM

I tried to find some 2GB 7770s and 6850s, but no such luck right now. Maybe you could get a single 7870 instead? It should have nearly identical performance and they all have 2GB of VRAM, so they don't have a VRAM limitation.
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a c 166 U Graphics card
a b À AMD
May 7, 2012 2:08:48 AM

$500 PC:
Actually I believe $500 for that PC is a very fair asking price. First of all it would cost $100+tax to buy Windows 7 alone.

If you include TAX and shipping, but assume low shipping with deals etc he's got maybe $350 at most for his hardware. Build a PC for LESS than that price and come back and tell me it's not a good deal at $500 without tax.

Graphics Card:
On the other hand, you'd want to spend about $250 to $300 on a better graphics card which then gives you $800 to build your own.

CONCLUSION:
- the PC at $500 is a great value for a light gamer or non-gamer
- replacing the graphics card negates the value of the machine and you should build your own
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 7, 2012 2:55:44 AM

It's a decent price if you include Windows. I missed that, so my bad. However, I don't pay for Windows. I either use a copy that M$ gives away for free or dirt cheap (college students are given lots of freebies and huge discounts and I know several students within my family), or I use an eval copy. I often miss the Windows price because I don't need to pay it.

Just because you asked, I will get a list of parts for a build like you suggested.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 3:00:27 AM

perplexityx said:
So I should avoid this computer at all costs because its AMD? regardless if it does meet what I want to do? AGAIN if I wanted to change someone on the computer then I would but it is prebuilt. I didnt pick these parts



Please dont listen to these people that is a solid rig for that price.You wpuldnt see a big difference in gaming between this and an I5 Trust me ive owned them both.Nothing wrong with that rig man id do it
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 7, 2012 3:03:26 AM

Anonymous said:
Please dont listen to these people that is a solid rig for that price.You wpuldnt see a big difference in gaming between this and an I5 Trust me ive owned them both.Nothing wrong with that rig man id do it


With the GTX 550 TI, there will be NO difference between a Phenom II x6 1100T and even an i7-3960X. The 1100T is not slow enough to bottleneck the 550 TI at all.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 3:07:20 AM

blazorthon said:
With the GTX 550 TI, there will be NO difference between a Phenom II x6 1100T and even an i7-3960X.


The guy is asking if its a good price and yes it is stop trying to sell him something else.Why do you people always do this?Hes not going to beable to build a 17-3960x for less then $500 anyways.That 1100T is still a beastley rig and you will NOT see a difference in gaming with that and an I5 unless he sli then you would see the difference.
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a c 87 U Graphics card
May 7, 2012 3:21:10 AM

Anonymous said:
The guy is asking if its a good price and yes it is stop trying to sell him something else.Why do you people always do this?Hes not going to beable to build a 17-3960x for less then $500 anyways.That 1100T is still a beastley rig and you will NOT see a difference in gaming with that and an I5 unless he sli then you would see the difference.


I'll just wait here while you tell me where I tried to sell him an i7-3960X. I used it to prove a point and nothing more. My whole point was that the AMD processor does not bottle-neck the GTX 550 TI at all, so that the computer has an AMD processor is not a problem in the least.

FYI, The i7-3960X costs ~$1050 @ newegg. I never recommend it to anyone, not even high budget builders. That is because the i7-3930K provided nearly identical performance despite only costing ~$600.

Also, nothing that has a GTX 550 TI is a beastly rig. That machine, including Windows, is an excellent value for that price. However, just because a cheap machine has a good amount of performance for it's price does not make it a "beastly" rig. Of course, that term is rather subjective and our definitions of it probably differ, but I won't call a computer that is on the bottom of mid-ranged gaming performance a beastly rig. I will call it a beastly rig for the money, but that is not the same as calling it a beastly rig. I even acknowledged that it was good for the money in a previous post.

Also, the 1100T is enough for SLI GTX 550 TI. Give the 1100T a moderate overclock (from 3.3GHz to 4GHz) and it can then handle even a GTX 580 or Radeon 7870 excellently.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 4:05:02 AM

blazorthon said:
I'll just wait here while you tell me where I tried to sell him an i7-3960X. I used it to prove a point and nothing more. My whole point was that the AMD processor does not bottle-neck the GTX 550 TI at all, so that the computer has an AMD processor is not a problem in the least.

FYI, The i7-3960X costs ~$1050 @ newegg. I never recommend it to anyone, not even high budget builders. That is because the i7-3930K provided nearly identical performance despite only costing ~$600.

Also, nothing that has a GTX 550 TI is a beastly rig. That machine, including Windows, is an excellent value for that price. However, just because a cheap machine has a good amount of performance for it's price does not make it a "beastly" rig. Of course, that term is rather subjective and our definitions of it probably differ, but I won't call a computer that is on the bottom of mid-ranged gaming performance a beastly rig. I will call it a beastly rig for the money, but that is not the same as calling it a beastly rig. I even acknowledged that it was good for the money in a previous post.

Also, the 1100T is enough for SLI GTX 550 TI. Give the 1100T a moderate overclock (from 3.3GHz to 4GHz) and it can then handle even a GTX 580 or Radeon 7870 excellently.



I meant the cpu was still beastly.At 1080p he should beable to max out most games with that 550 ti even.Dude a stock 1100T would barley bottleneck a 7870 if at all.If you have never owned one you really havent a clue what your talking about.I would even bet a 7950 wouldnt bottleneck a 1100T At stock clocks.You guys use this term to loosley without doing your research.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 4:06:46 AM

My 965 be never bottlenecked gtx 470 sli so i doubt a 1100 t would bottneck a 7950 or 7970 for that matter maybe alittle bit but not much at all
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