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Hd 6950 psu

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May 7, 2012 12:03:14 AM

hi guys, I just got a xfx radeon 6950 2Gb dual fan, and I cannot get to a clear conclussion regarding the PSU :( 

at the time I bought it, the guy told me that it'd work just fine with my current 500W psu, which happens to be false, sometimes, while gaming, the pc shuts down :pfff:  , so, I have a lil' problem with that, and some friends told me that I have to change the PSU to 1000W...the thing is, I do not have the money to get a 1000W psu, so, I was just wondering if it would be enough with 700 or 750W, I have just the processor, an i5 750, a 500 Gb HDD @7200rpm, the 6950 and soon I'll get the corsair h80 cooling system. do you think it's enough with 700 or 750? or do I have to get to the thousand? also take into acc that I'm planning to overclock my i5 and the gpu. what do you guys say?

More about : 6950 psu

May 7, 2012 12:25:26 AM

a quality 750W or 850W PSU should be sufficient
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May 7, 2012 12:35:19 AM

For a single HD 6950 AMD recommends a 500w power supply with 2 6 pin PCIe connectors. That is assuming a generic power supply. A good quality 500w power supply will have no problems with an HD 6950 and overclocking your whole system. Whoever told you that you need a 1000w power supply is an idiot. AMD recommends a 1050w power supply for a 4 x HD 6950 Crossfired system.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

If you are having issues with your current power supply then make sure you replace it with a quality unit. Corsair, Seasonic, PC Power and Cooling, XFX, Silverstone, Enermax, OCZ and Antec are all quality brands.
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May 7, 2012 12:56:14 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Trust me 500W PSU is not enough you really don't want to skimp on psu bud i am only trying to help you get this it's 104.99 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I second this recommendation. 1000W is overkill, 500W is cutting it too close. A good power supply is always worth the money, it's the worst place to skimp on a build.
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May 7, 2012 1:01:21 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Trust me 500W PSU is not enough you really don't want to skimp on psu bud i am only trying to help you get this it's 104.99 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



It helps when you back up your posts with facts and not made up numbers from your head. You do NOT need a 750w power supply for an HD 6950.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2010/12/16/ati-radeon-...

Bit-tech measures 256 watts at load from the whole system.


Intel Core i7 Test System
•Intel Core i7-965 processor (3.2GHz: 133MHz x 24)

•Asus P6T V2 motherboard (Intel X58 Express with three PCI-Express 2.0 x16 slots)

•3x 2GB Corsair TR3X6G1333C9 memory modules (operating in dual channel at DDR3 1,600MHz 9-9-9-24-1T)

•Corsair X128 120GB SSD running v1 firmware

•Corsair HX1000W PSU

•Windows 7 Home Premium x64

•Antec Twelve Hundred Chassis


http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-6950-6970-review/1...


Guru3d measured 312 watts full load.

Measured power consumption Radeon HD 6950

System in IDLE = 174W
System Wattage with GPU in FULL Stress = 312W
Difference (GPU load) = 138W
Add average IDLE wattage ~ 20W
Subjective obtained GPU power consumption = ~ 158 Watts



That is the full system pulling 312 watts at load.......A power hungry full system with:

Mainboard

eVGA X58 Classified

Processor

Core i7 965 @ 3750 MHz

Memory

6144 MB (3x 2048 MB) DDR3 Corsair @ 1500 MHz


http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-6950-6970-review/1...
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May 7, 2012 1:05:08 AM

When AMD recommends a 500w power supply they assume you have a junk brand that peaks at 500 watts. Any of the brands I listed above supply their rated wattage at a continuous level not peak.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 1:09:37 AM

anort3 said:
It helps when you back up your posts with facts and not made up numbers from your head. You do NOT need a 750w power supply for an HD 6950.
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2010/12/16/ati-radeon-...
Bit-tech measures 256 watts at load from the whole system.

and i'll raise with a hexus review graph :) 


if your scared, say your scared and get a 550. i love these hives, wish i had one :p 
Rosewill HIVE Series HIVE-550 550W Continuous @40°C, 80 PLUS BRONZE $69.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

a review:
Rosewill Hive 550W
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May 7, 2012 1:11:08 AM

+1 to anort.

500w is plenty for a 6950, as long as its a good brand with a stable 12v rail.

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May 7, 2012 1:23:56 AM

anort3 said:
It helps when you back up your posts with facts and not made up numbers from your head. You do NOT need a 750w power supply for an HD 6950.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2010/12/16/ati-radeon-...

Bit-tech measures 256 watts at load from the whole system.


Intel Core i7 Test System
•Intel Core i7-965 processor (3.2GHz: 133MHz x 24)

•Asus P6T V2 motherboard (Intel X58 Express with three PCI-Express 2.0 x16 slots)

•3x 2GB Corsair TR3X6G1333C9 memory modules (operating in dual channel at DDR3 1,600MHz 9-9-9-24-1T)

•Corsair X128 120GB SSD running v1 firmware

•Corsair HX1000W PSU

•Windows 7 Home Premium x64

•Antec Twelve Hundred Chassis


http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-6950-6970-review/1...


Guru3d measured 312 watts full load.

Measured power consumption Radeon HD 6950

System in IDLE = 174W
System Wattage with GPU in FULL Stress = 312W
Difference (GPU load) = 138W
Add average IDLE wattage ~ 20W
Subjective obtained GPU power consumption = ~ 158 Watts



That is the full system pulling 312 watts at load.......A power hungry full system with:

Mainboard

eVGA X58 Classified

Processor

Core i7 965 @ 3750 MHz

Memory

6144 MB (3x 2048 MB) DDR3 Corsair @ 1500 MHz


http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-6950-6970-review/1...
Read what he said as follows: at the time I bought it, the guy told me that it'd work just fine with my current 500W psu, which happens to be false, sometimes, while gaming, the pc shuts down :pfff: 
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 1:28:36 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Read what he said as follows: at the time I bought it, the guy told me that it'd work just fine with my current 500W psu, which happens to be false, sometimes, while gaming, the pc shuts down :pfff: 

pardon my "butting in" which i did already . not ALL 500 watts PSUs are made the same. i have seen 500 watts fail on a 350 load. i have also seen 500 watt PSUs handle a 600 watts load. it "quality" not "quantity".

OP was obviously sold a POS PSU since it did fall within the AMD recommendation.
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May 7, 2012 1:28:46 AM

He said he plains on overclocking as well Overclocking, or raising a part (CPU, Video Card, RAM) frequency beyond the manufacturer set frequency to gain extra performance, is a strain for a power supply. If you overclock, it is even more important to have a high-quality power supply that can handle the extra load.

As the frequency increase, so does the power consumed by the overclocked part. If you raise the voltage, the power consumption goes up even more, putting even more stress on your power supply. How much is hard to quantify, as every CPU and video card have different power requirements. However, it is not rare to see the power consumption go up by 50W, 100W, 150W or even more, depending on your computer setup.

I simply recommend that if you overclock, make sure that your power supply is powerful enough to handle the extra load. If you have a cheap power supply or are already close to its limit, do not overclock as you’re putting your power supply and possibly your computer on the line!
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May 7, 2012 1:33:10 AM

Anonymous said:
pardon my "butting in" which i did already . not ALL 500 watts PSUs are made the same. i have seen 500 watts fail on a 350 load. i have also seen 500 watt PSUs handle a 600 watts load. it "quality" not "quantity".

OP was obviously sold a POS PSU since it did fall within the AMD recommendation.
Yeah,i understand what your saying i am only trying to help the OP out Knowing that a good power supply can last you many years, you want to think about possible upgrades to your computer system in the future, to make sure that your power supply can handle the load with that new part.

For example, if you choose to go with an on-board video card for now, but decide to upgrade to an high-end video card, which can easily draw 150-200W alone, you want to make sure to consider that when you’re planning your power supply purchase.

Otherwise, your computer won’t boot, will freeze, reboot randomly or in the worse case scenario, your power supply will give up with a bang, literally. In the process, it might fry one or several parts in your computer too. You wouldn’t be happy if your brand new $300 video card gets kill because of an inadequate power supply now, would you?
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May 7, 2012 1:34:43 AM

You failed reading comprehension right?
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 1:35:22 AM

bigcyco1 said:
He said he plains on overclocking as well Overclocking, or raising a part (CPU, Video Card, RAM) frequency beyond the manufacturer set frequency to gain extra performance, is a strain for a power supply. If you overclock, it is even more important to have a high-quality power supply that can handle the extra load.

As the frequency increase, so does the power consumed by the overclocked part. If you raise the voltage, the power consumption goes up even more, putting even more stress on your power supply. How much is hard to quantify, as every CPU and video card have different power requirements. However, it is not rare to see the power consumption go up by 50W, 100W, 150W or even more, depending on your computer setup.

I simply recommend that if you overclock, make sure that your power supply is powerful enough to handle the extra load. If you have a cheap power supply or are already close to its limit, do not overclock as you’re putting your power supply and possibly your computer on the line!


please provide links to that claim. there is a large difference to increasing 0.05 volts to a cpu than adding another gpu.
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May 7, 2012 1:37:42 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Knowing that a good power supply can last you many years, you want to think about possible upgrades to your computer system in the future, to make sure that your power supply can handle the load with that new part.

For example, if you choose to go with an on-board video card for now, but decide to upgrade to an high-end video card, which can easily draw 150-200W alone, you want to make sure to consider that when you’re planning your power supply purchase.

Otherwise, your computer won’t boot, will freeze, reboot randomly or in the worse case scenario, your power supply will give up with a bang, literally. In the process, it might fry one or several parts in your computer too. You wouldn’t be happy if your brand new $300 video card gets kill because of an inadequate power supply now, would you?



I am going to have to side with bigcyco1 on this one. It is better to be prepared for the future and go a little over on PSU than get just what you need. 1000W is a bit too far overboard, but a 750W is a nice middle ground that is guaranteed to power that system without a problem and have room for additional things to be added later without worrying about the PSU. I always hate having to think about a power supply upgrade when I want to upgrade something else. In the end, this is up to the OP though, a good (emphasis on good) 500W power supply may work just fine. But I would recommend getting some extra headroom.
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May 7, 2012 1:41:04 AM

I am done wasting my breath OP just a tip when choosing a PSU As much as the power (Watts) requirement matters, the current requirement, measured in Amps is as important if not even more important. This is especially true if you have a or several dedicated video card(s). As a general rule of thumb, you’re aiming for the highest number on the 12V line.Power Supplies that are certified 80 PLUS have been independently tested for their efficiency. Now, there are 4 different 80 PLUS certifications, depending on how efficient the power supply is:

80 PLUS: The power supply is at least 80% efficient at 20%,50% and 100% load
80 PLUS Bronze: The power is at least 82% efficient at 20% and 100% and 85% efficient at 50% load.
80 PLUS Silver: The power is at least 85% efficient at 20% and 100% and 88% efficient at 50% load.
80 PLUS Gold: The power is at least 87% efficient at 20% and 100% and 90% efficient at 50% load.

The 80 PLUS and highercertifications are the way to go when you are looking for an efficient power supply.

Do not trust specifications such as “Efficiency: 80% to 85% Efficiency Typical” that are not 80PLUS certified. 80 PLUS is an independent standard test. No 80 PLUS and “Efficiency: 80% to 85% Efficiency Typical” means that it is 80% to 85% efficient, according to the manufacturer that is, using their own in-house test, which may or may not so much represent real efficiency. Anyway,best of luck take care,and god bless!!
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 1:44:28 AM

HVDynamo said:
I am going to have to side with bigcyco1 on this one. It is better to be prepared for the future and go a little over on PSU than get just what you need. 1000W is a bit too far overboard, but a 750W is a nice middle ground that is guaranteed to power that system without a problem and have room for additional things to be added later without worrying about the PSU. I always hate having to think about a power supply upgrade when I want to upgrade something else. In the end, this is up to the OP though, a good (emphasis on good) 500W power supply may work just fine. But I would recommend getting some extra headroom.


ok, i am going to very crass and rude; bigcyco1 is an idiot.

he is spewing ignorant garbage and making claims that he cannot back up with an once of proof. GO read some reviews on PSUs. GO read some reviews on graphic cards. go play around with some online PSU calculators. check out the PSU cal i have in my sig. but DO NOT take someone's unsubstantiated BS as gospel!
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May 7, 2012 1:55:11 AM

Anonymous said:
ok, i am going to very crass and rude; bigcyco1 is an idiot.

he is spewing ignorant garbage and making claims that he cannot back up with an once of proof. GO read some reviews on PSUs. GO read some reviews on graphic cards. go play around with some online PSU calculators. check out the PSU cal i have in my sig. but DO NOT take someone's unsubstantiated BS as gospel!


I am not saying his numbers are right or wrong, what I am agreeing with is the recommendation of a larger than 500Watt power supply. Look at the comment of his I quoted and not the others as that is the one I am replying to. I am not saying your numbers are wrong either, but there is value in choosing a larger power supply when considering the future of that computer. That is something I agree with bigcyco1 on. The root of this argument is your preferred methodology of what size power supply to use versus his in this case. His numbers may have been exaggerated, yes. However when looking at it like he does (and I do as well), it's better to work with exaggerated numbers to ensure you end up with a capable enough PSU for now, and for the future. You can be as crass and rude as you like, but I still agree with the comment I quoted previously. The OP has both sides of the story here, it is up to him to decide which methodology is best for him (both are valid).
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May 7, 2012 2:00:38 AM

Anonymous said:
ok, i am going to very crass and rude; bigcyco1 is an idiot.

he is spewing ignorant garbage and making claims that he cannot back up with an once of proof. GO read some reviews on PSUs. GO read some reviews on graphic cards. go play around with some online PSU calculators. check out the PSU cal i have in my sig. but DO NOT take someone's unsubstantiated BS as gospel!
Thanks man i am only trying to help the OP out and as you can also see the type of class of some of the members calling people idoit. and insulting me just goes to show you the type of some here :lol: 
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 2:13:45 AM

HVDynamo said:
I am not saying his numbers are right or wrong, what I am agreeing with is the recommendation of a larger than 500Watt power supply. Look at the comment of his I quoted and not the others as that is the one I am replying to. I am not saying your numbers are wrong either, but there is value in choosing a larger power supply when considering the future of that computer. That is something I agree with bigcyco1 on. The root of this argument is your preferred methodology of what size power supply to use versus his in this case. His numbers may have been exaggerated, yes. However when looking at it like he does (and I do as well), it's better to work with exaggerated numbers to ensure you end up with a capable enough PSU for now, and for the future. You can be as crass and rude as you like, but I still agree with the comment I quoted previously. The OP has both sides of the story here, it is up to him to decide which methodology is best for him (both are valid).


there are a few posts and graphs that show a total system power usage of 266 watts getting a 500 watt PSU wil allow the OP breathing room; even for the h80 water cooling.

there is as much of a downside to getting too big of a PSU as too small. rarely is a system running at full tilt, it idles quite a bit. when a PSU has less than a 20% load at idle is causes the PSU to run inefficiently and get hot which ages the PSU. so getting MORE than a 600 watts PSU would mean the system idles no less than 120+ watts which is much higher than the OPs specs.

so my point is, you can't JUST look at the load and think, another 100 watts will be better. it won't.
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May 7, 2012 2:36:32 AM

Anonymous said:
there are a few posts and graphs that show a total system power usage of 266 watts getting a 500 watt PSU wil allow the OP breathing room; even for the h80 water cooling.

there is as much of a downside to getting too big of a PSU as too small. rarely is a system running at full tilt, it idles quite a bit. when a PSU has less than a 20% load at idle is causes the PSU to run inefficiently and get hot which ages the PSU. so getting MORE than a 600 watts PSU would mean the system idles no less than 120+ watts which is much higher than the OPs specs.

so my point is, you can't JUST look at the load and think, another 100 watts will be better. it won't.



I am familiar with the how the efficiency changes with with different loads. I would still argue that the downside of getting too small of a PSU is much worst than getting too large of a PSU. Too small of a PSU can die spectacularly and take other components with it when they die (could end up being really expensive to fix) versus getting too big of a PSU may not operate at peak efficiency all the time, but the extra heat (if it even is more) is not going to be more than the PSU is designed to disperse. The reason I question the extra heat is that the power lost is a percentage of the wattage used. Sure, the ratio of power lost to power consumed is higher when at lower percentage of total power, but that percentage lost is being multiplied by a much smaller number now too.

Lets use the Antec Earthwatts 650Watt I linked to above as an example. it is 80 Plus Bronze, so at 20% capacity it is 82% efficient, at 50% it is 85% efficient, and at 100% it is 82% efficient. Output Power / Input Power = efficiency, so Output power/Efficiency = Input power.

20% capacity = 130 Watts so 130/0.82 = 158.54 Watts - 130 = 28.5 Watts dissipated in heat
50% capacity = 325 Watts so 325/0.85 = 382.35 Watts - 325 = 57.4 Watts dissipated in heat
100% capacity = 650 Watts so 650/0.82 = 792.68 Watts - 650 = 142.7 Watts dissipated in heat

The math there shows that in fact, there will be less heat generated at the low wattage despite the lesser efficiency in that zone. The difference between a 500Watt and a 650 Watt is very likely negligible between these two, so I stand by my advice to get the larger supply.
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 2:47:30 AM

would you be so kind as to link where you got those number from?
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May 7, 2012 2:51:24 AM

The efficiency ones? Wikipedia

The PSU in my example is a 650W listed as 80 Plus Bronze compliant, so I grabbed the 80 Plus Bronze requirements. as far as the numbers I calculated, the math is there for you to see.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_PLUS
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 3:02:22 AM

thank you. because those do differ from the actually tested specs:
Antec Earthwatts EA 650W green Review
however both your and the review numbers do not take into account for UNDER 20%. because it doesn't need tested to receive a certification.
i am sorry i do not have the time right now to find a few links showing how far of a drop off efficiency is under 20% load. its getting late in my neck of the woods and i have work early in the morning.

thanks for a civil discussion and see ya around later.

night :sleep: 

QUICK EDIT:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_%28compu...
Power rating 3rd paragraph:
"Although a too-large power supply will have an extra margin of safety as far as not over-loading, a larger unit is often less efficient at lower loads (under 20% of its total capability) and therefore will waste more electricity than a more appropriately sized unit. Computer power supplies generally may shut down or malfunction if they are loaded too lightly, less than about 15% of rated total load."
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Anonymous
May 7, 2012 3:08:13 AM

out
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Best solution

May 7, 2012 3:39:32 AM

Anonymous said:
thank you. because those do differ from the actually tested specs:
Antec Earthwatts EA 650W green Review
however both your and the review numbers do not take into account for UNDER 20%. because it doesn't need tested to receive a certification.
i am sorry i do not have the time right now to find a few links showing how far of a drop off efficiency is under 20% load. its getting late in my neck of the woods and i have work early in the morning.

thanks for a civil discussion and see ya around later.

night :sleep: 

QUICK EDIT:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_%28compu...
Power rating 3rd paragraph:
"Although a too-large power supply will have an extra margin of safety as far as not over-loading, a larger unit is often less efficient at lower loads (under 20% of its total capability) and therefore will waste more electricity than a more appropriately sized unit. Computer power supplies generally may shut down or malfunction if they are loaded too lightly, less than about 15% of rated total load."



Good point, I think he will end up idling near 20% on the 650Watt though, so I don't think it will be that big of an issue for him. I will, however concede on the need for going with a 750 Watt though, 650Watt is much better. I do know that the 650Watt Earthwatts will power up and give stable voltages with barely more than a hard drive attached as I have actually done that, but the efficiency is probably ridiculously bad at that point. It does seem rather hard to find efficiency numbers for PSU's under 20%.

Side note: Check reference number 11 on the Wikipedia page you linked. What they say there, should be illegal. My guess with the OP's machine is that either he has a crappy PSU like one of those and it can't really handle the power, or his power supply is simply dying.

This whole thing makes me want to connect a power meter to my system to see just what it is pulling. I have also enjoyed this discussion. Night
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May 7, 2012 4:00:22 AM

26 posts and the OP hasn't responded... Think that means anything?

I'll throw in my 2 cents. A GOOD 500W PSU is more than enough to power a single 6950. MORE THAN ENOUGH. The only reason you'd need a 750w is for Crossfire.





http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-6970-rade...



http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...



http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/HIS/Radeon_HD_6950/2...

http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-6950-6970-review/1...
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2010/12/16/ati-radeon-...
http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/amd_hd6970_hd69...
All show the 6950 below 400w, usually around 350w. A QUALITY 500W PSU is plenty for a single 6950.
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May 7, 2012 4:00:56 AM

HVDynamo said:
Good point, I think he will end up idling near 20% on the 650Watt though, so I don't think it will be that big of an issue for him. I will, however concede on the need for going with a 750 Watt though, 650Watt is much better. I do know that the 650Watt Earthwatts will power up and give stable voltages with barely more than a hard drive attached as I have actually done that, but the efficiency is probably ridiculously bad at that point. It does seem rather hard to find efficiency numbers for PSU's under 20%.

Side note: Check reference number 11 on the Wikipedia page you linked. What they say there, should be illegal. My guess with the OP's machine is that either he has a crappy PSU like one of those and it can't really handle the power, or his power supply is simply dying.

This whole thing makes me want to connect a power meter to my system to see just what it is pulling. I have also enjoyed this discussion. Night

I will agree with that . ;) 
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May 11, 2012 3:58:50 PM

Best answer selected by rottencabbage.
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May 11, 2012 9:46:36 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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