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New X79 Build!

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July 1, 2012 5:09:06 AM

I was Just wondering if these components would be 100% compatible with each other for a stable and reliable system. Any other ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Asus Motherboard P9X79 DELUXE Core i7 LGA2011 X79 DDR3 SATA USB PCI Express ATX

Intel Core i7 i7-3820 3.60 GHz Processor

Thermaltake Fan CLW0216 CPU Cooler Water2.0 Pro 120mm Dual PWM Fan (Installing Noctua Fan NF-F12 PWM Fan with Focused Flow SO2 Bearing for performance and silent operation)

Corsair Memory CMZ16GX3M2A1600C10 16GB DDR3 1600 2x240 DIMM Vengeance Black (Will be installing more of the same kits in the future to utilize the quad channel, 16Gb is more than I need right now)

SAPPHIRE HD7770 1000MHZ 1GDDR5 128 BIT,2XMINI-DSPLY PORT,HDMI DUAL-LINK DVI, PCI-E 3.0 X16 (Will be upgrading in the future)

Intel SSD SSDSC2MH120A2K5 9.5mm 510Series 120GB 2.5inch MLC SATA 6Gb/s

Western Digital Caviar Black WD2002FAEX 2 TB 3.5" Internal Hard Drive - SATA/600 - 7200 rpm - 64 MB Buffer

CORSAIR AX850 850W MODULE PSU ATX12V V2.31 /EPS12V V2.92 80+ GOLD, ACTIVE PFC

CORSAIR 550D MID-TOWER QUIET DESIGN, CABLE MANAGEMENT, 2X USB 3.0

I am hoping to be able to upgrade this system as time goes on and this is why I went with the X79 platform.








More about : x79 build

July 1, 2012 5:19:40 AM

intels platforms are killed off on a regular schedule so x79 will probably not give you a longer life
Without knowing what you intend to use your pc for its not possible to make informed comment on the merits of your hardware selection
........but if its a gamer its terrible for the money
July 1, 2012 5:34:40 AM

I will be using it mostly for video editing and encoding. I will not be using it for gaming (at least not any serious gaming).

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July 1, 2012 5:43:30 AM

better off building a amd pc
reason its cheaper, more support and compatibility wont confuse you!!!
also the rog mobos give you 32gb of ram so you cant go wrong with that and an 8 core this system will cost maybe 10% or more less from the current build price
July 1, 2012 6:17:01 AM

Intel all the way... if you really want speed then go for the X79...

the I7-3820($288.00) is ranked at number 30 with a score of 9669 under passmark - cpu mark

the next available amd processor down the list is AMD FX-8150 Eight-Core at rank numer 51 with a score of 8,259.

The ONLY available AMD cpu's ranked higer are the OPERATONS 6272($539.99) and 6274($649.99) ranked ranked 17 and 29.

I dont see how this is 10 cheaper going with AMD over INTEL... but look at the results yourself:

http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html

Even if you have 8 cores on the FX-8150, the 3820 destroys it!!!

July 1, 2012 6:19:36 AM

aking93 said:
better off building a amd pc
reason its cheaper, more support and compatibility wont confuse you!!!
also the rog mobos give you 32gb of ram so you cant go wrong with that and an 8 core this system will cost maybe 10% or more less from the current build price


I am replacing my AMD PC with this as I have only had problems with my Asus Crosshair V Formula MOBO paired with a Phenom II X6 1100t. Nothing but BSOD's constantly without the system being overclocked. Really haven't been impressed with AMD from the start.

Price isn't really the issue, I am looking for system that will do anything I throw at it while being very stable and reliable.

thanks for the reply!
July 1, 2012 6:25:02 AM

I have to agree with xaviergzz, intel is a better way to go imo. I have never had as many problem with a build as I have with AMD, and once I did get the system up and running the performance has always been disappointing.
July 1, 2012 6:25:14 AM

TopDog09 said:
I am replacing my AMD PC with this as I have only had problems with my Asus Crosshair V Formula MOBO paired with a Phenom II X6 1100t. Nothing but BSOD's constantly without the system being overclocked. Really haven't been impressed with AMD from the start.

Price isn't really the issue, I am looking for system that will do anything I throw at it while being very stable and reliable.

thanks for the reply!



Then go for the i7=3930k... if price is no object...and I like the P9X79 DELUXE over other x79 asus mobos
July 1, 2012 6:37:45 AM

I just can't bring myself to pay that much for a processor, also I don't feel that the performance increase warrants the an extra $270 that it would cost me to get the 3930k.

Thanks for the reply!
July 1, 2012 6:38:47 AM

Budget?
July 1, 2012 6:44:54 AM

TopDog09 said:
I just can't bring myself to pay that much for a processor, also I don't feel that the performance increase warrants the an extra $270 that it would cost me to get the 3930k.

Thanks for the reply!



Intel Core i7-3930K @ 3.20GHz 13,548 ranked at number 6 it should be like 40% increase in performance over the 3820... im just saying... if I were to buy that...it does justify the price increase...
July 1, 2012 6:57:02 AM

TopDog09 said:
I am replacing my AMD PC with this as I have only had problems with my Asus Crosshair V Formula MOBO paired with a Phenom II X6 1100t. Nothing but BSOD's constantly without the system being overclocked. Really haven't been impressed with AMD from the start.

Price isn't really the issue, I am looking for system that will do anything I throw at it while being very stable and reliable.

thanks for the reply!


you need to check your RAM voltage and speed .

Presumably you have 4 RAM sticks installed and that will require a little bit of manual input to get best results since the memory controller will default to 1333 MHz .
If you have manually set RAM speed higher you will also have to raise voltages .
Most likely that is what is causing your blue screens

Best solution

July 1, 2012 6:03:28 PM
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I just built an X79 system two weeks ago. Looking through the CPU reviews, the only logical choice when building and X79 system is to go with the i7-3930k. If you go with the 3820, then you only gain a few advantages that I know of over an Ivy Bridge quad-core CPU: quad-channel memory, 40 PCIE lanes (compared to something like 16? lanes for Ivy Bridge), and some virtualization and advanced vector instructions. Quad-channel memory is nice, but is only useful for operations that are more memory-intensive than compute-intensive. The extra PCIE lanes give you the chance to pull off all of the extra performance available from a Crossfire or SLI system, but if you have only one GPU and no RAID controllers or other high-throughput PCIE devices, then it just goes to waste. If you aren't doing any virtualization, then the virtualization instructions don't do you any good, and the other instructions depend on how a program was compiled, so may or may not be used.

The i7-3960X is also not a great choice unless you are just trying to throw money away. It is capable of being overclocked to a level a bit more extreme than the 3930K, but it costs $400 to do it. If you don't do an extreme overclock, then you're paying $400 for 100MHz extra.

I chose the i7-3930K and the same motherboard you picked. I have never used the 3820, so I can't tell you how well it performs in comparison, but the 3930K absolutely blows me away. It is amazing how fast my Ubuntu 12.04 guest system runs in VirtualBox inside of Windows 7 Ultimate x64. It is fast enough to convince me that I have two extremely fast computers, rather than just one. I haven't yet done any video transcoding, but I'll let you know if anything comes up in the next day or two and let you know how it goes.

Your hardware choices are all compatible as far as I can tell. Your choice of RAM is fine, but again, if you go with the 3820 and then only use 2 DIMMs, you are buying a Sandy Bridge system and paying a high premium for it. I would suggest that you choose a 16GB 4x4GB kit rather than a 2x8GB kit. You have 8 DIMM slots to work with, so if you ever need more than 16GB, then you can still add another 32GB of RAM in the future (so long as all of the sticks are the same speed and voltage it wouldn't matter that one kit is 4x4GB and one is 4x8GB). You can find 4x4GB kits for relatively cheap, though I ould suggest that you try to find kits that run at 1.5v if possible. There are several kits advertised as "X79 only" because they run at 1.65v (the Sandy Bridge E CPUs' built-in memory controllers are capable of handling memory at higher voltages than the regular Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge chips).

So, in conclusion, my suggestion is to try to find a way to spring for the i7-3930K. It is the absolute best CPU that you will find in the consumer market for heavy processing (there are probably much better CPUs in Intel's XEON line, but they are in the $1k-2k price range). I am extremely happy that I chose the 3930K over the current crop of Ivy Bridge CPUs. If you choose the 3820 and a dual-channel memory kit, then you are just wasting money. If you pick a 3820 and a quad-channel kit, then you will probably get slightly better encoder performance, but you have to ask yourself whether or not that slight boost is worth the extra money.
July 3, 2012 4:21:08 AM

Best answer selected by TopDog09.
July 3, 2012 4:25:00 AM

N0BOX said:
I just built an X79 system two weeks ago. Looking through the CPU reviews, the only logical choice when building and X79 system is to go with the i7-3930k. If you go with the 3820, then you only gain a few advantages that I know of over an Ivy Bridge quad-core CPU: quad-channel memory, 40 PCIE lanes (compared to something like 16? lanes for Ivy Bridge), and some virtualization and advanced vector instructions. Quad-channel memory is nice, but is only useful for operations that are more memory-intensive than compute-intensive. The extra PCIE lanes give you the chance to pull off all of the extra performance available from a Crossfire or SLI system, but if you have only one GPU and no RAID controllers or other high-throughput PCIE devices, then it just goes to waste. If you aren't doing any virtualization, then the virtualization instructions don't do you any good, and the other instructions depend on how a program was compiled, so may or may not be used.

The i7-3960X is also not a great choice unless you are just trying to throw money away. It is capable of being overclocked to a level a bit more extreme than the 3930K, but it costs $400 to do it. If you don't do an extreme overclock, then you're paying $400 for 100MHz extra.

I chose the i7-3930K and the same motherboard you picked. I have never used the 3820, so I can't tell you how well it performs in comparison, but the 3930K absolutely blows me away. It is amazing how fast my Ubuntu 12.04 guest system runs in VirtualBox inside of Windows 7 Ultimate x64. It is fast enough to convince me that I have two extremely fast computers, rather than just one. I haven't yet done any video transcoding, but I'll let you know if anything comes up in the next day or two and let you know how it goes.

Your hardware choices are all compatible as far as I can tell. Your choice of RAM is fine, but again, if you go with the 3820 and then only use 2 DIMMs, you are buying a Sandy Bridge system and paying a high premium for it. I would suggest that you choose a 16GB 4x4GB kit rather than a 2x8GB kit. You have 8 DIMM slots to work with, so if you ever need more than 16GB, then you can still add another 32GB of RAM in the future (so long as all of the sticks are the same speed and voltage it wouldn't matter that one kit is 4x4GB and one is 4x8GB). You can find 4x4GB kits for relatively cheap, though I ould suggest that you try to find kits that run at 1.5v if possible. There are several kits advertised as "X79 only" because they run at 1.65v (the Sandy Bridge E CPUs' built-in memory controllers are capable of handling memory at higher voltages than the regular Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge chips).

So, in conclusion, my suggestion is to try to find a way to spring for the i7-3930K. It is the absolute best CPU that you will find in the consumer market for heavy processing (there are probably much better CPUs in Intel's XEON line, but they are in the $1k-2k price range). I am extremely happy that I chose the 3930K over the current crop of Ivy Bridge CPUs. If you choose the 3820 and a dual-channel memory kit, then you are just wasting money. If you pick a 3820 and a quad-channel kit, then you will probably get slightly better encoder performance, but you have to ask yourself whether or not that slight boost is worth the extra money.



thank you so much for all the info, i am now seriously considering the 3930k. I am also gonna go with the CORSAIR DDR3 4X8GB 1600MHZ 10-10-10-27 VENGEANCE SERIES (CMZ32GX3M4X1600C10 ) quad channel memory. Thanks again
July 3, 2012 4:44:22 AM

TopDog09 said:
thank you so much for all the info, i am now seriously considering the 3930k. I am also gonna go with the CORSAIR DDR3 4X8GB 1600MHZ 10-10-10-27 VENGEANCE SERIES (CMZ32GX3M4X1600C10 ) quad channel memory. Thanks again


Not a problem, and good luck with your build!
!