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Nikon D50 vs D70

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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 12:38:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I am trying to decide between this 2
(http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=2&produc... and
http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=2&produc...) and
would really appreciate any / all comments.

- manzoor

More about : nikon d50 d70

Anonymous
August 6, 2005 9:31:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

GTO
Why a 70? Wouldn't a 70s be better? What's the downside of a 70s?
Paul


GTO wrote:
> Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>
> Gregor
>
> "Manzoorul Hassan" <manzoorul.hassan@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1123299521.146108.287090@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>>I am trying to decide between this 2
>>(http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=2&produc... and
>>http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=2&produc...) and
>>would really appreciate any / all comments.
>>
>>- manzoor
>>
>
>
>
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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 4:18:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Am Sat, 06 Aug 2005 05:09:44 -0400 schrieb Paul Schilter:

> GTO
> Why a 70? Wouldn't a 70s be better? What's the downside of a 70s?
> Paul
>

The D70s is much more expensive for some (IMHO) not so needful additional
things.
The D70 is available for 647,- Euro
the D70s cost over 850,- Euro
(in Germany)

Boris


--
_ .--- You know we're sitting on four million pounds
________/ |______@/ of fuel, one nuclear weapon and a thing that
(__NATO_/__|___==-c has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest
o oo bidder. Makes you feel good, doesn't it?
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 5:50:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 05:09:44 -0400, Paul Schilter wrote:

>GTO wrote:
>> Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>
>Why a 70? Wouldn't a 70s be better? What's the downside of a 70s?

It's really not that much of an upgrade; the D70 will be cheaper,
you get like 90% of the upgrade if you get the newest firmware for
the D70 (the other 10% include the * 0,2" * bigger LCD).
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 8:49:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Rolf,
Thanks, I wasn't aware that so much of the *S* model was software.
Paul


Rolf Egil Sølvik wrote:
> On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 05:09:44 -0400, Paul Schilter wrote:
>
>
>>GTO wrote:
>>
>>>Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>>
>>Why a 70? Wouldn't a 70s be better? What's the downside of a 70s?
>
>
> It's really not that much of an upgrade; the D70 will be cheaper,
> you get like 90% of the upgrade if you get the newest firmware for
> the D70 (the other 10% include the * 0,2" * bigger LCD).
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:30:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

And suffer from FCB problem .. yeah rite :) 

=bob=

"GTO" <gregor_o@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:6XXIe.168$911.15@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>
> Gregor
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:30:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

It happened on earlier D70 model. Do you have one that showed this
problem? - There are so many D70 in the field that it is no wonder some
units are experiencing problems. I assume the D50 will have its own quirks.
We just don't know them yet ;-)

Gregor

"[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
news:42f4ad4a$0$16513$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
> And suffer from FCB problem .. yeah rite :) 
>
> =bob=
>
> "GTO" <gregor_o@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:6XXIe.168$911.15@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>> Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>>
>> Gregor
>
>
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:17:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

We were comparing D70 and D70s, not D50.
D70s is prone to have problem , but no one knows what yet. So far so good.
+ the FCB problem happens on random selection of D70, not necessarily the
earlier batch.
In other forum, a member has a 5months old D70 and it has the famous LED
blinking problem aka FCB problem.

=bob=

"GTO" <gregor_o@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:UL8Je.3255$fJ1.647@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
> It happened on earlier D70 model. Do you have one that showed this
> problem? - There are so many D70 in the field that it is no wonder some
> units are experiencing problems. I assume the D50 will have its own
> quirks. We just don't know them yet ;-)
>
> Gregor
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 5:12:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

What's the "FCB problem"?

N.


"[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
news:42f4ad4a$0$16513$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
> And suffer from FCB problem .. yeah rite :) 
>
> =bob=
>
> "GTO" <gregor_o@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:6XXIe.168$911.15@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>> Get a D70 new if you can still get one!
>>
>> Gregor
>
>
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 8:19:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Does the D50 have depth of field preview?

T.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 9:59:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

This is a major drawback of the D50 then.

As far as I know the 300d/350d and even the Pentax models have it.

T.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 10:44:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm as 'new' as you are Kevin so take everything I say like I'm an
idiot.

The reason I like DOF is that back in the 35mm days, cheap cameras
didn't have it, expensive ones did.

Now as a default, the camera always held the aperture wide open to
maintain a bright viewfinder.

When you hit the shutter, the camera would release the aperture lock
and fire the shutter.

Therefore your impression was always of a very well lit image (f1.4 for
example) while the actual shot would be as set (eg. f5.6).

The DOF got around that buy letting the camera show you f5.6 (for
example) before you took the shot.

See why this is important?

Of course it entirely depends on your habits.

T.
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 12:41:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

A few members of some Internet forum is a bad reference for this kind of
problem. People in such groups can pretty much post any unverifiable data
they want. "I had a D70 that exploded!". Well, do you believe it?

Based on newsgroup postings, I would not discourage people from buying a D70
with so many units out there that work just fine. Remember, users that are
happy with their equipment do usually not post messages about this fact. But
the ones who purchased lemons will cry out loudly. - I think a new D70 is
the best deal he can get (not the D70s!). Otherwise, he should by a Canon
20D. Today, the D70s isn't worth that much. Last year, and without the 20D,
it was different.

BTW, the original thread compared D70s with D50. He just wrote the wrong
title. I recommend a new D70, but not the D70s.

Gregor


"[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
news:42f55315$0$16465$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
> We were comparing D70 and D70s, not D50.
> D70s is prone to have problem , but no one knows what yet. So far so good.
> + the FCB problem happens on random selection of D70, not necessarily the
> earlier batch.
> In other forum, a member has a 5months old D70 and it has the famous LED
> blinking problem aka FCB problem.
>
> =bob=
>
> "GTO" <gregor_o@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:UL8Je.3255$fJ1.647@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>> It happened on earlier D70 model. Do you have one that showed this
>> problem? - There are so many D70 in the field that it is no wonder some
>> units are experiencing problems. I assume the D50 will have its own
>> quirks. We just don't know them yet ;-)
>>
>> Gregor
>
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 4:43:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The D50 does not have a depth of field preview button.

Gregor

<tlai909@visto.com> wrote in message
news:1123456740.737058.133490@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Does the D50 have depth of field preview?
>
> T.
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 5:21:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

tlai909@visto.com wrote:
> This is a major drawback of the D50 then.

I'm a new photographer, so bear with me if this is a stupid question.

Under what circumstances would one use the DOF preview button?

On my new D70, I have played with it but can't think of a practical
situation where I would use it. When I do portraits zoomed in and lens
wide open, I can already see the blurring effects in the viewfinder. In
most other situations, the difference in view with DOF activated, and not,
seem to be very subtle.
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 5:30:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

GTO <gregor_o@nospamyahoo.com> wrote:
> the ones who purchased lemons will cry out loudly. - I think a new D70 is
> the best deal he can get (not the D70s!). Otherwise, he should by a Canon
> 20D. Today, the D70s isn't worth that much. Last year, and without the 20D,
> it was different.

I am new to digital photography (well, not really, I've owned a Powershot
compact digital camera for a number of years, but always just for snapshots,
I'm new to DSLR's and skilled photography), and for my grad gift this year
I picked out a Nikon camera. I was torn between the D50 and the D70s, too,
and even considering buying the D50 body with the 18-70 lens from the D70s
kit. I went to all the local camera shops and tried my best to haggle for
the best deal, but all were only within a few dollars of each other.

Finally (almost on a whim) I went to a store here in Ottawa called "Bleeker's
Stereo and TV", after I heard their radio ad while driving ("Come on in for
the best deals on Nikon digital cameras!") Well, their sticker prices were
all MSRP, but I lucked out... behind their D70s floor model was a D70,
priced $100 cheaper (still $1499 Canadian though). As it happened, it was
the last one and they wanted to get rid of it, so they sold it to me for
about $1200 (i.e. the MSRP of the D50 kit).

So in the end my dilemma was solved, as I got the D70 for the price of a D50.
It was a demo model, but when I started taking pictures, the first photo was
DSC_0001 -- it had never actually been powered up.

I'm up to about DSC_4200 now, less than 6 weeks later. This is a fun camera!
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:13:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 01:21:26 +0000, Kevin wrote:

> tlai909@visto.com wrote:
>> This is a major drawback of the D50 then.
>
> I'm a new photographer, so bear with me if this is a stupid question.
>
> Under what circumstances would one use the DOF preview button?
>
> On my new D70, I have played with it but can't think of a practical
> situation where I would use it. When I do portraits zoomed in and lens
> wide open, I can already see the blurring effects in the viewfinder. In
> most other situations, the difference in view with DOF activated, and not,
> seem to be very subtle.
You are looking at the effects with the largest aperture, to see the
effect with the aperture you are using you need the lens stopped down to
the taking aperture.

--
Neil
Delete delete to reply by email
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 1:02:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Kevin" <kevin@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:D d6c2m$hba$1@driftwood.ccs.carleton.ca...
> tlai909@visto.com wrote:
>> This is a major drawback of the D50 then.
>
> I'm a new photographer, so bear with me if this is a stupid question.
>
> Under what circumstances would one use the DOF preview button?
>
> On my new D70, I have played with it but can't think of a practical
> situation where I would use it. When I do portraits zoomed in and lens
> wide open, I can already see the blurring effects in the viewfinder. In
> most other situations, the difference in view with DOF activated, and not,
> seem to be very subtle.

The so-called DOF preview button is pretty worthless in most circumstances,
but many users demand one anyway and apparently enjoy pushing it for some
reason. It *does not* really show the depth of field, which is its supposed
purpose.

First, the limitations of viewfinder optics make it impossible to accurately
judge what the DOF will be on the final print, which of course will be much
magnified, substantially reducing the actual delivered DOF relative to what
appears in the viewfinder even stopped down. Second, at the smallest
apertures, where there could be some use to gauging the DOF, the viewfinder
image becomes so dark as to make it impossible to do so even if there were
not the other viewfinder limitations.

The chief (if not only) usefulness as far as I'm concerned is to show
undesirable objects in the composition which might have gone unnoticed with
the lens wide open. For example, there might be a garbage can at some
distance behind your subject which you didn't notice when taking the shot
because of the shallow depth of field wide open.

I've been using 35mm SLRs for over 40 years, some with DOF preview buttons
and some without. All of my present 35mm SLRs have this feature, but I
almost never use it. On the other hand, a friend of mine says he uses it on
his cameras all the time. I doubt it's really doing anything for him, but
since he feels it's giving him some useful information, what the heck, it
does no harm and I suppose he might as well keep pushing that cherished
button.

But I do agree with the previous writer who said the DOF preview is useful
when doing macro work. There you're often not so much concerned with the
actual range of perceived perfect sharpness as you are with the overall look
of *relatively* sharp vs. unsharp parts of the picture (you don't
necessarily want maximum DOF), and the preview button delivers that nicely.

N.
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 12:24:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 8 Aug 2005 01:21:26 GMT, Kevin <kevin@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>I'm a new photographer, so bear with me if this is a stupid question.
>
>Under what circumstances would one use the DOF preview button?
>
>On my new D70, I have played with it but can't think of a practical
>situation where I would use it.

I do a lot of macro, and DOF preview gives me an idea of what the DOF
is going to be without having to take a test shot. You might
oversimplify it and say that a large DOF is always good in macro (when
you don't need to worry about a background, that is), but the other
side of the coin is that a higher DOF is always associated with a
higher loss of fine detail by diffraction, so DOF preview lets me
choose a diaphragm opening that gives me a sufficient DOF without
closing down the diaphragm more than needed. It is also useful when
focusing, to see which portions of the subject need a focus
adjustment.

DOF preview gives just an idea of this, of course, but a dynamic one
as you change the aperture settings and move the camera. A test shot
seen on the tiny LCD display on the camera back also gives you only an
idea of how the picture looks, but it is a static, not dynamic
preview.

In non-macro, DOF preview gives you an idea of the bokeh and of what
parts of the picture will be out of focus, and by how much.

>When I do portraits zoomed in and lens
>wide open, I can already see the blurring effects in the viewfinder.

With the lens wide open, WYSIWYG and DOF preview is not needed.

>In
>most other situations, the difference in view with DOF activated, and not,
>seem to be very subtle.

Try it with a long tele at f/22 or in photomacrography, and you will
change your mind.
!