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photos on CD

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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 12:53:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Now it seems all labs give you photos on cd for 0.99c extra
whether you want it or not.
So you get prints, negatives, and a cd.
However, the software that comes on the cd is so annoying
I dont even use it. The photos are upside down, and they seem grainy
eventhough I use ISO-100. Photos seem like low res scans. Perhaps
it's because they are enlarged as they are all above 1000x1000.
My question is, do labs scan from the negatives or from the prints?
What I mean is when they put the undeveloped rolls into the machine, do
they save the photos to the hd and then burn to the cd?
This whole thing seems like a scam to get more $ from customers,
or punishment for using film.

If I scan the negs or the prints will I get higher res?

More about : photos

August 6, 2005 1:37:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Go somewhere else to develop your films. You're the CUSTOMER, not their
mark.

I've gone to several places, but around here they're all using one of
two systems now it seems - Fuji Frontier or Nortisu QSS. AFAIK they
both scan the film negative internally and then "print" the digitized
photo onto the photo paper with lasers. They have some info at the Fuji
website (WARNING - 4 MB):
http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/bin/Frontier...

Apparently the Frontier machines can save the internal scan to disk, if
it's the right model and if the lab has invested in some special
software. However, when you order a CD disk at most eg. Walmarts (and
most other labs, too), your negatives are sent through an entirely
separate high speed film scanner/CD writer - and that's why you get
cr@p. It's low quality, low resolution (~1.3 Mpixel range); there's a
lot of dust in the machine because they never clean it, they never
apply scratch or dust removal programs - too slow. It's certainly not
worth $1 per, the blank disk costs 5 cents and the stuff they put on it
is worthless. I've gotten much better results scanning negatives with a
cheap flatbed scanner.

OTOH, if you can find a lab that saves the internal digitized file
that's actually printed to the photo paper, it might be worth your
while - the dust/scratch/exposure correction software those machines
use is very sophisticated. I've never come across a lab that does this,
though, so I don't know for sure; and frankly I gave up trying. I
certainly wouldn't EVER go back to a lab that forced me to buy one of
their POS CDs.

ECM
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 3:28:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Learning the hard way from experience, I have found that the absolute
resolution of the digital images can vary depending upon who does the
work. Using Fuji lab to process my film once, the digital images were
600-800k JPEG files. I made the mistake of having my local drugstore
do processing (because it was faster turnaround) and digital files, and
got back much lower resolution images that were only 80-100k JPEG
files.
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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 5:02:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 6 Aug 2005 08:53:42 -0700, Mr.Happy sadly stated:

> Now it seems all labs give you photos on cd for 0.99c extra
> whether you want it or not.

All labs? No, I don't think so.


> So you get prints, negatives, and a cd.
> However, the software that comes on the cd is so annoying
> I dont even use it. The photos are upside down, and they seem grainy
> eventhough I use ISO-100. Photos seem like low res scans. Perhaps
> it's because they are enlarged as they are all above 1000x1000.

They are low res scans.


> My question is, do labs scan from the negatives or from the prints?
> What I mean is when they put the undeveloped rolls into the machine, do
> they save the photos to the hd and then burn to the cd?

Scans, even low-res scans are made from the negatives. Whether
the scanned images are saved to a hard drive or not shouldn't
matter. Only one roll's worth of images are saved to the CDs
anyway, so buffering all of the low-res scans in memory shouldn't
require more than a fraction of the memory contained in your own PC.


> This whole thing seems like a scam to get more $ from customers,
> or punishment for using film.

At 99 cents for the CD the price per image is pretty low,
especially considering that huge amount of processing required to
reverse each image so that they appear upside down. If the photo
lab converted the images to B&W they'd probably have to charge you
at least $2.99 per CD.


> If I scan the negs or the prints will I get higher res?

If the scanned prints are small snapshots you'll almost certainly
be disappointed. If you pay a lab to scan the negatives and save
higher resolution images, you'll wonder why you ever thought that 99
cents was a lot of money. If you find the right lab it can
sometimes be economical to get scans made if they are done at the
same time the film is developed. But if you bring back negatives
and ask for scans, expect the prices to be steep.

If you own your own scanner and are capable of scanning negatives,
you probably wouldn't have asked the question, so I'd say your
solution is to find a photo lab that produces higher resolution
scans than what you got (and it sounds like you got a "Picture CD").
If you can find a lab that still produces Kodak "Photo CDs" you'll
have much higher resolution scans - up to 6 times the number of
pixels per image compared to what you get from Picture CDs. They're
more expensive, but each CD can easily hold more than a 100 images,
so you can get from 3 to 5 rolls worth of images stored on each CD,
depending on whether you use 20 or 36 exposure rolls.

It may be time to start thinking about using a digital camera.
Each picture they take is equivalent to a hi-res scan without their
required time and expense. I haven't had Photo CDs made in over 5
years, and that's due to switching from film to digital cameras.
It's saved me a lot of money in print and processing costs.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:07:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mr.Happy wrote:
> Now it seems all labs give you photos on cd for 0.99c extra
> whether you want it or not.
> So you get prints, negatives, and a cd.
> However, the software that comes on the cd is so annoying
> I dont even use it. The photos are upside down, and they seem grainy
> eventhough I use ISO-100. Photos seem like low res scans. Perhaps
> it's because they are enlarged as they are all above 1000x1000.
> My question is, do labs scan from the negatives or from the prints?
> What I mean is when they put the undeveloped rolls into the machine, do
> they save the photos to the hd and then burn to the cd?
> This whole thing seems like a scam to get more $ from customers,
> or punishment for using film.
>
> If I scan the negs or the prints will I get higher res?
>


Depends on who is doing the photo CD, but for most of these being done
today, the answer is yes- A good print scanner or neg scanner sold today
will generally give you higher res than the normal CD from a photo
finisher. The exception is the old Kodak Photo CD. These were very
high quality, high res scans. I don't know if these are even offered
any more- I used the process only till I got a decent scanner of my own.
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 6:09:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi Don,

Yes, a Photo CD is much different than a Picture CD. The technologies are
different as well. Picture CD is done at the time of processing and yields
a scan to JPG at 1536 x 1024 resolution. A Photo CD is done in the PCD
format and the resulting file can then be opened in a number of resolutions
(5) for traditional scans and (6) if you have a professional or 4x6 scan.
The quality of these scans are quite good. Photo CD has been around since
the late 80s when that technology was excellent and quite advanced for its
time.

You can learn more about both by going to the following sites.

http://www.kodak.com/go/photocd

http://www.kodak.com/go/picturecd

Good luck and enjoy.

Let me know if you have any other questions..

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company

"Don Stauffer" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:ltpJe.37$pf1.9582@news.uswest.net...
> Mr.Happy wrote:
> > Now it seems all labs give you photos on cd for 0.99c extra
> > whether you want it or not.
> > So you get prints, negatives, and a cd.
> > However, the software that comes on the cd is so annoying
> > I dont even use it. The photos are upside down, and they seem grainy
> > eventhough I use ISO-100. Photos seem like low res scans. Perhaps
> > it's because they are enlarged as they are all above 1000x1000.
> > My question is, do labs scan from the negatives or from the prints?
> > What I mean is when they put the undeveloped rolls into the machine, do
> > they save the photos to the hd and then burn to the cd?
> > This whole thing seems like a scam to get more $ from customers,
> > or punishment for using film.
> >
> > If I scan the negs or the prints will I get higher res?
> >
>
>
> Depends on who is doing the photo CD, but for most of these being done
> today, the answer is yes- A good print scanner or neg scanner sold today
> will generally give you higher res than the normal CD from a photo
> finisher. The exception is the old Kodak Photo CD. These were very
> high quality, high res scans. I don't know if these are even offered
> any more- I used the process only till I got a decent scanner of my own.
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