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Help identify old P4.

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  1. I would say there isn't too much faster on your chipset. You really have a limited mileage with P4 systems. I think it's worth saving that money and investing more in your next system.
  2. Yup live with it for a bit longer, save the cash,and buy a whole new setup.
  3. Try to get a software , name : CPU-Z ,
    to identify it ~

    If u unable to identify it ~
    Going to get a new PC , better go for core i series , dont buy a core 2 duo , by then , u will realize u waste money on it , as it is no longer is upgradeable ~
  4. vipervoid1 said:
    Going to get a new PC , better go for core i series , dont buy a core 2 duo , by then , u will realize u waste money on it , as it is no longer is upgradeable ~

    A platform does not need to be upgradable to still be a massive upgrade for whatever the OP currently has. Almost any Core2Duo would already be 3-4X faster than his current PC.

    Also, unless you grossly under-buy a new LGA1155 or LGA2011 build, no CPU worth upgrading to is going to come out during the socket's 3-4 years commercial lifespan so although an i5/i7 build may be "upgradable", there won't be anything worth upgrading them to unless you made the mistake of buying a Celeron or Pentium when your usage patterns warranted an i5 or better in the first place. Not many people with i5-2xxx will ever bother upgrading to i5-3xxx... most people don't upgrade CPUs at all between new PCs.

    The main thing I would be concerned about with buying an used C2D (after DOA) would be having sufficient RAM included in it if the system uses DDR2 since upgrading that with fresh parts can cost almost as much as a whole brand-new PC.
  5. There is nothing you can really upgrade to I mean it doesn't support Pentium D's or Core 2 so you might as well just relax and save up for something new.
  6. Ebay $50 ; INTEL P4 672 SL8Q9 3.8 GHz LGA775 800MHz FSB 2M Cache

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/INTEL-P4-672-SL8Q9-3-8-GHz-LGA775-800MHz-FSB-2M-Cache-/400243216004

    But basically half the price of a current quality entry level motherboard.
  7. good comments all around.

    about cpu-z and such... i can't run windows on that box. linux only.

    about upgrading the mobo, i will probably do it. but for ~$100~£50 i probably can't get a board with the same SATA ports for my setup nor the same high end cooler, nor the same RAM... then prices add up. or i have to use a noise cooler, less RAID redundancy, etc.

    i was thinking about the CPU because it's a 15min upgrade that doesn't impact anything else with hidden costs and time sink. as upgrading a MOBO always is... (i will do that later on, just not now)

    what i hope is to get my 30~40s compile time to some 15~25s or so. but i can't find a single benchmark for that kind of load on those CPUs... why every damn hardware site only care about the game of the month? :??:
  8. gcb said:
    what i hope is to get my 30~40s compile time to some 15~25s or so. but i can't find a single benchmark for that kind of load on those CPUs... why every damn hardware site only care about the game of the month? :??:

    Compiling stuff is one of the things Intel's Netburst architecture sucked the most at since parsing/compiling code has extremely unpredictable branching and calling behavior and this brings out the worst out of Netburst's heavy pipeline stall penalties from branch mispredicts.

    If a P4 can compile a given project in 60 seconds, a similarly clocked Core2 or i3/i5 would likely be done doing the same in less than 20 seconds, even faster if your rebuilds often span multiple object files and you use make -jNN to build them in parallel. Another possible speedup would be less file reloading/swapping due to having more RAM for work, cache and bumping the number of parallel jobs.
  9. Best answer selected by gcb.
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