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July 3, 2012 1:56:45 AM

Hi i am currently looking to build a gaming desktop but i know absolute nothing about it. Someone told me to post this here and someone would help me with everything. i have a budget at about 800-900 bucks. i need everything i have nothing no monitor no os no nothing. I need all the help i can get links on what i need to build on links on how to build it and if someone could please link each part i need to have a powerful gaming desktop. i want to play games such as Arma2:D ayZ Diablo 3 Amnesia and more. If any other info is needed please let me know. and up ahead THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

More about : desktop building

July 3, 2012 2:53:54 AM

Parts
CPU-i3-2120-125 newegg
GPU-7770-140 newegg
MOBO-GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3-100 newegg
RAM-G.SKILL SNIPERS 8 gb-60 gb newegg
PSU-600 watt corsair 80 plus certified-70 dollars
CASE-COOLER MASTER Elite 430 RC-430-KWN1 Black Steel / Plastic Computer Case-50 newegg
MONITOR acer 23 inch-140
OS-180
that leaves 20 dollars for mouse and keyboard
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July 3, 2012 2:56:27 AM

Download the motherboard manual before ordering and read it. You'll need to understand it for a first build. If you can't, select another board. Also do a search for youtube videos on building a system. Several are available. Newegg links below:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $110
Check craigslist for windows 7 (be sure its sealed with the coa keycode) $75
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $215
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $108
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $19
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $40 after rebate.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $135 after rebate.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $65
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $55 after rebate.

Total: $872 after rebates


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July 3, 2012 3:10:11 AM

o1die said:
Download the motherboard manual before ordering and read it. You'll need to understand it for a first build. If you can't, select another board. Also do a search for youtube videos on building a system. Several are available. Newegg links below:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $110
Check craigslist for windows 7 (be sure its sealed with the coa keycode) $75
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $215
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $108
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $19
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $40 after rebate.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $135 after rebate.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $65
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $55 after rebate.

Total: $872 after rebates


so this would be everything i need and what you mean download the motherboard manual?? is it really hard to build one i heard it was easy even for new people
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July 3, 2012 3:22:51 AM

It is easy, that doesn't mean it isn't also easy to screw up. You should always read the documentation that comes with your products and read some guides, watch some videos before you start opening boxes. This isn't a lego set, a computer is a several hundred dollar investment.

I would say that it would be worthwhile to spend a little more on a better video card than a 6850, from odies build, but either way its a decent system.

If you could compensate for it you could go with a cheaper CPU
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

to make room for this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Although it would put you over budget.
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July 3, 2012 4:02:34 AM

nekulturny said:
It is easy, that doesn't mean it isn't also easy to screw up. You should always read the documentation that comes with your products and read some guides, watch some videos before you start opening boxes. This isn't a lego set, a computer is a several hundred dollar investment.

I would say that it would be worthwhile to spend a little more on a better video card than a 6850, from odies build, but either way its a decent system.

If you could compensate for it you could go with a cheaper CPU
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

to make room for this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Although it would put you over budget.


thanks for the option i might save up alittle more and do what you said but what i want to know is what stuff would i need to improve my system further on for a game like arma:2 dayz
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July 3, 2012 4:07:01 AM

NP, I'm honestly not familar with that game specifically. I cant imagine you would have any trouble playing it with any of the configurations suggested thus far looking at its minimum system requirements. I will say that for gaming, the single most important factor is almost always the video card.

You don't want to go too cheap on the CPU, but at the same time, if you have to pick between a more powerful video card and a cheaper CPU, the better choice is usually going to be the better video card.

Having said that, I would consider bare minimum a quad core CPU, which the Intel i5s are. i3s are only dual cores, for the sake of system longevity a quad is the way to go.
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July 3, 2012 5:01:43 AM

nekulturny said:
NP, I'm honestly not familar with that game specifically. I cant imagine you would have any trouble playing it with any of the configurations suggested thus far looking at its minimum system requirements. I will say that for gaming, the single most important factor is almost always the video card.

You don't want to go too cheap on the CPU, but at the same time, if you have to pick between a more powerful video card and a cheaper CPU, the better choice is usually going to be the better video card.

Having said that, I would consider bare minimum a quad core CPU, which the Intel i5s are. i3s are only dual cores, for the sake of system longevity a quad is the way to go.


do you know any other place to get the os windows 7 because i cant find one on craigslist or i must not be looking right and thanks you i have taken your advice and replaced the two parts with your suggestions and i think the budget will be ok just have to wait about a week more or so
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July 3, 2012 5:09:19 AM

Yes, its $100 on Newegg.com and its a 100% certain legitimate copy.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Now another user did bring this site to my attention, but I cannot make any guarantees into its legitimacy.

http://www.softwaresupplygroup.com/microsoft-windows-7-...

It came from this thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/352756-31-budget-gami...

Aznshinobi is a good guy, don't get me wrong, but just to cover my bases like I said there, it seems "too good to be true" to me. BetterBusinessBuerau has been known to sell "high ratings" to businesses who have the money, so I take BBB ratings with a grain of salt.

I would say also, to forget about an SSD unless you can afford at least a 128GB one. 64GB is pretty tiny and very easy to fill up.
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July 3, 2012 5:32:23 AM

nekulturny said:
Yes, its $100 on Newegg.com and its a 100% certain legitimate copy.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Now another user did bring this site to my attention, but I cannot make any guarantees into its legitimacy.

http://www.softwaresupplygroup.com/microsoft-windows-7-...

It came from this thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/352756-31-budget-gami...

Aznshinobi is a good guy, don't get me wrong, but just to cover my bases like I said there, it seems "too good to be true" to me. BetterBusinessBuerau has been known to sell "high ratings" to businesses who have the money, so I take BBB ratings with a grain of salt.

I would say also, to forget about an SSD unless you can afford at least a 128GB one. 64GB is pretty tiny and very easy to fill up.


ok so to help me out can you list all the parts again in order so i can be sure about it and these products are compatible with each other and do they come with everything i need or is there other plugs to be bought?? thank you again lol
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Best solution

a c 118 B Homebuilt system
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July 3, 2012 5:46:20 AM

Alrite, everything here will build a fully functional computer, and is completely compatible, (some of my parts will differ from O1dies, but I have my own preferences for brand and model recommendations as you've seen by now, that doesn't mean his are bad, just different, although unless I missed a link, I think he forgot RAM:

CPU- i5-2400 $190
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Motherboard- Asrock Z68 $120
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Video card- Radeon 7850 $230 after mail in rebate
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Optical Drive- $19
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case- CoolerMaster Elite 430 $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Power- Seasonic M520 -$60
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hard Drive- 500GB WD- $70
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM- Gskill 8GB kit- $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Monitor- $110
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Windows7- $100
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Keyboard- Microsoft Ergonomic 4000- $37
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mouse- Logitech G500 $58
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total as configured: $1094

Note- I know the keyboard is a bit odd looking, I have one myself, I basically had to "learn to type" all over again when I got it, but I will say that now that I have, I love the thing. I've had it for about 4 years. Up to you, any keyboard will do really, and theres certainly cheaper ones out there. It really is nice for ergonomics, I delivered newspapers for several years when I was younger, the rubber bands gave me carpal tunnel.

Yes, the mouse is more expensive than it needs to be, all I can say is, again, I have one, I like it a lot. Use a 10 dollar wal-mart one if you want, it will do just fine. My personal preference is I'm picky about mice. I HATE stubby mice, that my fingers hang over, which seems to be the problem I find with most wal-mart mice. I also have grown tired of the short life spans of wireless mice. Ironically, wired mice are now hard to find in retail stores. Kinda like staples, I wanted a printer that just prints, not an all-in-one with a scanner and such, guy showed me the models he had that were just printers, they cost more than all-in-ones. Such is the price oldschoolers like myself pay for technological advancement.
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July 3, 2012 6:31:02 AM

Best answer selected by sexymanbeast.
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July 3, 2012 6:32:12 AM

Thank you so much and yes I think he forgot ram and my last question is do I need to buy a monitor or can I use my vizo LCD 23 inch HDTV?
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July 3, 2012 6:35:39 AM

You're welcome. Yes you can use your HDTV, I will add one more thought though, Dual monitors are awesome. (Or 1 HDTV and one monitor). Once you go dual monitor, you won't go back. Its great for multitasking. I really would scratch my eyes out before I ever had another single monitor system. :lol: 

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July 3, 2012 10:35:10 AM

The motherboard manual gives you instructions on installing the ram, cpu, power supply leads, etc. Don't assume you know enough to proceed without it if this is your first build. It only takes a few minutes to read the first sections, and the bios section will let you know your adjustment options.
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July 3, 2012 2:45:34 PM

o1die said:
The motherboard manual gives you instructions on installing the ram, cpu, power supply leads, etc. Don't assume you know enough to proceed without it if this is your first build. It only takes a few minutes to read the first sections, and the bios section will let you know your adjustment options.



so i would need to find what ever motherboard manual online and download it and read it or does it come in the mother board box when i order it? and thank you also for all the information you guys have given me hopefully nothing goes wrong i will use your information and do alot of research online about building a desktop thank you again
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July 3, 2012 3:43:48 PM

I would download it first before ordering. Asus and some others have good manuals. The biostar I recommended may not. I have alot of experience, so I don't need a great manual. But for someone like yourself, you may need a clear and complete manual. Some manuals are written by engineers whose primary language is chinese, not english. If you can't understand it (if it's poorly written) I would select another board. The bios section is critical for overclocking if you ever want to try it, but I don't recommend overclocking anymore. Today's cpus are so fast it's not necessary. I prefer stability.
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July 3, 2012 5:31:55 PM

o1die said:
I would download it first before ordering. Asus and some others have good manuals. The biostar I recommended may not. I have alot of experience, so I don't need a great manual. But for someone like yourself, you may need a clear and complete manual. Some manuals are written by engineers whose primary language is chinese, not english. If you can't understand it (if it's poorly written) I would select another board. The bios section is critical for overclocking if you ever want to try it, but I don't recommend overclocking anymore. Today's cpus are so fast it's not necessary. I prefer stability.



so lets say i go with the one that nekulturny suggested would tis be the correct manual for it and what specific parts would i have to read or should i read the whole thing? http://download.asrock.com/manual/Z68%20Extreme3%20Gen3...
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July 3, 2012 6:22:54 PM

Read the first sections about installing the basics: cpu, ram, power supply leads, etc. then skip to the bios section. As a first time builder, I doubt you'll want to mess much with the bios settings, except for the boot order,"smartfan" and shutdown temps. Loud fans are a common problem; smartfan can quiet down the cpu fan; msi also had smartfan setting for a second fan port on the board, but that's rare. If you don't want to read the asrock manual, at least view some youtube videos about assemblying pc's, and maybe you'll find one about "breadboarding".
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July 3, 2012 6:30:50 PM

Keep in mind, if you go with the i5-2400 or any Intel CPU without a K at the end of the model number, you won't be overclocking your CPU, as the non-K models have a locked multiplier.

You can technically still overclock them at the reference clock, but thats a bad idea on Sandy/Ivy Bridge, they have very little tolerance for it and very little performance to be gained from it.

As far as overclocking in general, really theres very little risk to it these days, so little in fact, at least according to my professor for years she wasn't allowed to even discuss it in class, since I guess professors who are prepping students for CompTiA and MCSE have to adhere to industry standards. Now thats changed.

Of course there is always still a risk, but anything in life thats worth doing is not without risk.
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July 3, 2012 8:54:13 PM

nekulturny said:
Keep in mind, if you go with the i5-2400 or any Intel CPU without a K at the end of the model number, you won't be overclocking your CPU, as the non-K models have a locked multiplier.

You can technically still overclock them at the reference clock, but thats a bad idea on Sandy/Ivy Bridge, they have very little tolerance for it and very little performance to be gained from it.

As far as overclocking in general, really theres very little risk to it these days, so little in fact, at least according to my professor for years she wasn't allowed to even discuss it in class, since I guess professors who are prepping students for CompTiA and MCSE have to adhere to industry standards. Now thats changed.

Of course there is always still a risk, but anything in life thats worth doing is not without risk.


ok i will keep that in mind....and im sorry yet again but i have another question my friend that is in the computer building business just told me that i might be able to get a DIY combo on newegg that would save money and be just as good but my problem is I DONT KNOW WHAT DIY IS lol and i dont know how it would save me money...if you could please help
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July 3, 2012 9:02:49 PM

DIY stands for Do-It-Yourself, lol. As far as the combo kits newegg does sell, the "problem" with them, is some of them give you less choice over the individual components, and they generally will sneak something in there that is complete crap.

Take this one for example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?I...

Theres some good stuff in there, but not a great choice of power supply. Did it really save you any money? It lists how much the parts cost in that combo if bought individually, but the MSI motherboard is overpriced for a MicroATX board, when you can get an Asrock full size ATX for the same price. It cut $20 bucks off the RAM by only giving you 4GB instead of 8. So suddenly that $45.95 in savings it touts doesn't seem that great.

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July 3, 2012 9:14:27 PM

nekulturny said:
DIY stands for Do-It-Yourself, lol. As far as the combo kits newegg does sell, the "problem" with them, is some of them give you less choice over the individual components, and they generally will sneak something in there that is complete crap.

Take this one for example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?I...

Theres some good stuff in there, but not a great choice of power supply. Did it really save you any money? It lists how much the parts cost in that combo if bought individually, but the MSI motherboard is overpriced for a MicroATX board, when you can get an Asrock full size ATX for the same price. It cut $20 bucks off the RAM by only giving you 4GB instead of 8. So suddenly that $45.95 in savings it touts doesn't seem that great.


i see thank you he also said to get a rosewell 600w power supply i dont know why what do you think i think your build is great and thanks again for taking the time to post it for me
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July 3, 2012 9:36:06 PM

No problem. Uhh, exactly what qualifications does this fellow have? Not that I'm saying I'm more qualified than he, since I'm still a student, but if he just gave you a general "any old Rosewill power supply will do", I wouldn't put much stock in what he says. Rosewill has some decent power supplies and some very lousy ones, and its only recently that Rosewill has started making competent PSUs.

A power supply decision is not to be taken lightly, you always want to pick one of good quality. Even good brands are known to have a few turds in their line. Wattage is not the sole determining factor when picking one. Although to save myself some typing, Proximon has a pretty good PSU guide here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324368-28-computer-po...

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July 3, 2012 10:08:36 PM

nekulturny said:
No problem. Uhh, exactly what qualifications does this fellow have? Not that I'm saying I'm more qualified than he, since I'm still a student, but if he just gave you a general "any old Rosewill power supply will do", I wouldn't put much stock in what he says. Rosewill has some decent power supplies and some very lousy ones, and its only recently that Rosewill has started making competent PSUs.

A power supply decision is not to be taken lightly, you always want to pick one of good quality. Even good brands are known to have a few turds in their line. Wattage is not the sole determining factor when picking one. Although to save myself some typing, Proximon has a pretty good PSU guide here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324368-28-computer-po...


i know the guy as a friend but he is really more of my brothers close friends and he said he works for a computer company idk exactly which one...and i got lucky he said he can get me a windows7 ultimate os for free so i saved myself 100 bucks but i will take your word you seem like you know a lot more about this so they power supply you told me i hope is good enough for my gaming needs
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July 3, 2012 11:19:20 PM

nekulturny said:
No problem. Uhh, exactly what qualifications does this fellow have? Not that I'm saying I'm more qualified than he, since I'm still a student, but if he just gave you a general "any old Rosewill power supply will do", I wouldn't put much stock in what he says. Rosewill has some decent power supplies and some very lousy ones, and its only recently that Rosewill has started making competent PSUs.

A power supply decision is not to be taken lightly, you always want to pick one of good quality. Even good brands are known to have a few turds in their line. Wattage is not the sole determining factor when picking one. Although to save myself some typing, Proximon has a pretty good PSU guide here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324368-28-computer-po...


the guy suggested this http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?I...
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July 4, 2012 12:20:15 AM

Yea, that guy is suggesting a weaker video card than a 7850.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/536?vs=549

Again, its not really saving you any money here if the price difference is achieved by using lower performing components. A 7770 is an entry-level gaming card, 7850s on the other hand are toward the upper end.

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July 4, 2012 3:43:17 PM

nekulturny said:
Yea, that guy is suggesting a weaker video card than a 7850.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/536?vs=549

Again, its not really saving you any money here if the price difference is achieved by using lower performing components. A 7770 is an entry-level gaming card, 7850s on the other hand are toward the upper end.


sorry i took so long but yea i told him and he said the same thing...for future reference can you add more parts i might need to upgrade for better gaming overall
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July 4, 2012 7:14:52 PM

Maybe an SSD but thats purely a luxury item, would help with games loading faster. I wouldn't buy one unless you can afford one thats at least 128GB of storage space though. Other than that, not really, that system should game pretty well.
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