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Don't you just love it when...

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Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:14:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

You go to the trouble of taking both your pocket camera (Fuji F10) and your
DSLR for a special event (big organized bike ride), using the F10 for
pictures on-the-run (while riding) and the 350XT for the really important
stuff, where you take the time to stop and actually compose a decent shot.

Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
*would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
ISO 1600!

Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed ISO
in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for my
own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.

Next time.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

More about : love

August 8, 2005 10:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Per Mike Jacoubowsky:
>Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
>*would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
>ISO 1600!

D70?

So far, I've just been playing with mine, but being reminded of the ISO via
viewfinder emerged early as an issue for me.
--
PeteCresswell
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 06:14:17 GMT, in rec.photo.digital "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

>You go to the trouble of taking both your pocket camera (Fuji F10) and your
>DSLR for a special event (big organized bike ride), using the F10 for
>pictures on-the-run (while riding) and the 350XT for the really important
>stuff, where you take the time to stop and actually compose a decent shot.
>
>Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
>*would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
>ISO 1600!
>
>Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed ISO
>in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for my
>own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.

Download a copy of the Neat Image demo and a profile for the camera at
http://www.neatimage.com They are never going to be as good as if you shot
at lowest iso properly exposed, but you should be able to salvage them.
Here's an example of a shot I took at iso1600 this weekend and cleaned up
with NI.
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/D70/misc/slid...
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Related resources
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(

Fortuanatly the 20D actually handles ISO1600 with very little noise, so
they actually came out ok, but not perfect.

It's just a mental process of checking ISO when you start shooting at a
location, something I'm trying to make a mantra now!

Craig
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
> You go to the trouble of taking both your pocket camera (Fuji F10) and your
> DSLR for a special event (big organized bike ride), using the F10 for
> pictures on-the-run (while riding) and the 350XT for the really important
> stuff, where you take the time to stop and actually compose a decent shot.
>
> Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
> *would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
> ISO 1600!
>
> Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed ISO
> in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for my
> own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.

Earlier, I used to keep everything to manual because hey, I am using an
SLR and the "Auto" or "Program" mode is for snaps not photographs.
Soon, I realised that unless flipping all the controls within a second
don't become my second nature, it is better to use "P" mode for
situation where I don't have much time. Ofcourse, the controls will
become second nature only when I use the camera day in and day out but
I don't get to use my camera that often.

Another issue is when people see the camera and see the photographs
from it. Somehow they expect all photos from the camera to be
outstanding. When they are not, they are disappointed and remark that
how they've seen better photos from much smaller cameras :) 

- Siddhartha
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 10:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <ZKCJe.422$dk5.216@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, Mike
Jacoubowsky <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

> Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
> *would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
> ISO 1600!

Any time I change from ASA 100, I always change it back when I'm done
doing whatever. That way, it's always at 100 the next time I go to use
it.
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 1:03:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:


> Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed ISO
> in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for my
> own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.

The most common error I make is not noticing how the exposure
compensation is set.

What I'd like to see is an option that allowed a user to select
a custom set of parameters, (one's preferred settings), and then
have the camera reset itself to these parameters every time you
powered it up. Of course, this feature could be turned on and off.

The menu choice would be something like:

On power up:

1 - Revert to your custom settings
2 - Retain current camera settings
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 2:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Not to argue, but every SLR camera I owned had an external dial with a
>number that you could easily see. The only way you were going to screw up
>was by not setting the dial when you loaded the film. That's a lot easier to
>keep track of, since there was no variable ISO you might use from
>shot-to-shot.

Yes, there may have been an ISO setting dial on the SLRs of old, but
there was always the opportunity to load a roll of film into the camera
and not set the dial, too, if you change mid-roll, as I did a lot.
(such as to permit some B&W photos in the middle of shooting color
slides) you might have ISO25 color slide and ISO125 B&W film to deal
with.

--Wilt
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 3:23:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Siddhartha Jain wrote:
[]
> Earlier, I used to keep everything to manual because hey, I am using
> an SLR and the "Auto" or "Program" mode is for snaps not photographs.
> Soon, I realised that unless flipping all the controls within a second
> don't become my second nature, it is better to use "P" mode for
> situation where I don't have much time. Ofcourse, the controls will
> become second nature only when I use the camera day in and day out but
> I don't get to use my camera that often.

I use P most of the time, and I did on my film SLR as well as my current
digital ZLRs. You can quickly learn where the exposure is likely to be
wrong (although the Nikon metering is very good), and simply expose on a
part of the scene which is nearer to 18% grey. I find this far quicker
than fiddling with the controls.

Yes, if I want absolute precision I can use manual.

David
August 8, 2005 5:05:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Craig Dunn wrote:
> I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
> colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
> figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(

Well it is a problem on this camera. I have done the same with a couple
of shots with my 350D. Very annoying!

BUT taking pictures for most of the day without noticing that you camera
suddenly uses shutter speeds on 1/1000 instead of 1/125 is your problem
and not the camera. How could you overlook this for most of a day?

So check your picture info once in a while. When you come home it will
be to late....
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 6:28:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim Townsend wrote:
[]
> The most common error I make is not noticing how the exposure
> compensation is set.

On my camera, the exposure compensation and the ISP value are clearly
shown in the viewfinder (so it's my fault should I fail to notice). Are
they not shown in your viewfinder?

David
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 6:28:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 14:28:31 GMT, in rec.photo.digital "David J
Taylor"
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid>
wrote:

>On my camera, the exposure compensation and the ISP value are clearly
>shown in the viewfinder (so it's my fault should I fail to notice). Are
>they not shown in your viewfinder?

On the D70 the iso value is not shown on the viewfinder display, there
is a notation for exposure comp.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 7:52:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> BUT taking pictures for most of the day without noticing that you camera
> suddenly uses shutter speeds on 1/1000 instead of 1/125 is your problem
> and not the camera. How could you overlook this for most of a day?


It was a pretty bright day, so I wasn't surprised about the shutter speeds;
the giveaway should have been the aperture, which I wasn't paying attention
to (I was shooting moving bicyclists, and need relatively-high shutter
speeds, so I was just blissfully going with the flow, thinking great, what a
magnificent camera...).

But yes, I should have checked!

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"JJ" <no@thanks.net> wrote in message
news:42f73c3c$0$1223$edfadb0f@dread11.news.tele.dk...
> Craig Dunn wrote:
>> I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
>> colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
>> figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(
>
> Well it is a problem on this camera. I have done the same with a couple of
> shots with my 350D. Very annoying!
>
> BUT taking pictures for most of the day without noticing that you camera
> suddenly uses shutter speeds on 1/1000 instead of 1/125 is your problem
> and not the camera. How could you overlook this for most of a day?
>
> So check your picture info once in a while. When you come home it will be
> to late....
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 8:04:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
> colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
> figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(
>
> Fortuanatly the 20D actually handles ISO1600 with very little noise, so
> they actually came out ok, but not perfect.

Some of the shots came out quite nicely, in terms of noise. It was actually
a pretty good experiment showing the pros & cons of using ISO1600, the main
con being lower dynamic range (too much contrast, which might be a function
of internal noise reduction).

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Craig Dunn" <abuse@codenation.net> wrote in message
news:1123492827.998789.43830@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
> colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
> figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(
>
> Fortuanatly the 20D actually handles ISO1600 with very little noise, so
> they actually came out ok, but not perfect.
>
> It's just a mental process of checking ISO when you start shooting at a
> location, something I'm trying to make a mantra now!
>
> Craig
>
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 12:05:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Yes, there may have been an ISO setting dial on the SLRs of old, but
> there was always the opportunity to load a roll of film into the camera
> and not set the dial, too, if you change mid-roll, as I did a lot.
> (such as to permit some B&W photos in the middle of shooting color
> slides) you might have ISO25 color slide and ISO125 B&W film to deal
> with.

Right, been there, done that. But when doing that, I was aware that the
reason I was going to all that trouble was for a specific purpose, not just
to shoot more photos, so changing the ISO setting for each roll was
something I just did automatically. And since the limitations of what you
could shoot depended very much on the film loaded into the camera, you
didn't pick it up without noticing what was in it (or at least I didn't),
and often you had a little window where you could actually see the type of
film and ISO.

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 12:41:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim Townsend" <not@real.address> wrote in message
news:11fepco6uau75b2@news.supernews.com...
> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>
>
>> Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed
>> ISO
>> in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for my
>> own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.
>
> The most common error I make is not noticing how the exposure
> compensation is set.
>
> What I'd like to see is an option that allowed a user to select
> a custom set of parameters, (one's preferred settings), and then
> have the camera reset itself to these parameters every time you
> powered it up. Of course, this feature could be turned on and off.
>
> The menu choice would be something like:
>
> On power up:
>
> 1 - Revert to your custom settings
> 2 - Retain current camera settings
>


Amen Jim!!! I'd also settle for a reset to base custom settings. I find
that I almost always start out at the same setting and then adjust according
to the environment so for me if I could power on the camera and hit a reset
that would set the camera to my base starting point I'd be really happy.

--

Rob
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 12:50:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:ZKCJe.422$dk5.216@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> You go to the trouble of taking both your pocket camera (Fuji F10) and
> your DSLR for a special event (big organized bike ride), using the F10 for
> pictures on-the-run (while riding) and the 350XT for the really important
> stuff, where you take the time to stop and actually compose a decent shot.
>
> Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
> *would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set
> at ISO 1600!
>
> Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed
> ISO in the viewfinder? You bet I would! But I'm not blaming the camera for
> my own stupidity. Besides, the F10 shots came out quite nicely.
>
> Next time.
>


I feel your pain Mike, Shot an entire 512Mb card on ISO 800 once. Yes I
should have noticed the shutter speed but I was shooting in AV mode and I
made the mistake of assuming the camera knew what it was doing. Well it did
know exactly what it was doing it was me who didn't. To help prevent this,
I've forced myself into always setting the camera to a base starting point
before I start shooting and then adjust from there. This way it just a
habit to take the camera out, reset to my base setting and then adjust as
necessary. Even with that I sometimes forget while shooting things like
exposure compensation even with the indicator in the view finder.

--

Rob
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 5:28:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

[..]
> Would I pay extra $$$ for a customized piece of firmware that displayed
> ISO in the viewfinder? You bet I would!

Pentax *ist DS does this. It says 'ISO' for any setting higher than 200.
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 5:28:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

[..]
> Not to argue, but every SLR camera I owned had an external dial with a
> number that you could easily see. The only way you were going to screw up
> was by not setting the dial when you loaded the film. That's a lot easier
> to keep track of, since there was no variable ISO you might use from
> shot-to-shot.

A lot of older cameras have an ASA/ISO setting dial, and the way you'd
do exposure compensation would be to move the dial.

So it's the same problem: Don't forget to set it back, or at least check
the setting.
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 11:00:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Robert R Kircher, Jr. wrote:
[]
> I feel your pain Mike, Shot an entire 512Mb card on ISO 800 once.

You really should ask that your camera displays this important
information. Avoid cameras which do not help you.

David
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 1:41:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:hoLJe.1932$Z87.1024@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
SNIP
> Some of the shots came out quite nicely, in terms of noise. It was
> actually a pretty good experiment showing the pros & cons of using
> ISO1600, the main con being lower dynamic range (too much contrast,
> which might be a function of internal noise reduction).

The lower Dynamic Range is caused by underexposure being re-amplified
by raising the analog gain before ADC conversion.

Bart
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:58:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Craig Dunn" <abuse@codenation.net> wrote in message
news:1123492827.998789.43830@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>I was out shooting in London on Saturday with my 20D, found some nice
> colourful shots in Soho that I grabbed on the way through, only to
> figure out later that I'd left mine on ISO 1600 for most of the day:-(
>
> Fortuanatly the 20D actually handles ISO1600 with very little noise, so
> they actually came out ok, but not perfect.
>
> It's just a mental process of checking ISO when you start shooting at a
> location, something I'm trying to make a mantra now!
>
> Craig
>

I agree,

The ISO could realy do with being on the LCD display.
August 11, 2005 1:37:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Per Lester Wareham:
>The ISO could realy do with being on the LCD display.

I wonder if that could be accomplished with a firmware upgrade?

Seems like the real question would be how much of what you see in the viewfinder
number-wise is hardware (i.e. dedicated LCDs or whatever) and how much is just
"screen space" that the firmware can draw on as desired.
--
PeteCresswell
Anonymous
August 14, 2005 8:07:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 8 Aug 2005, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

> Date: Mon, 08 Aug 2005 06:14:17 GMT
> From: Mike Jacoubowsky <mikej1@ix.netcom.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
> Subject: Don't you just love it when...
>
[snip]

> Your point-and-shoot pix come out fine, but the 350XT stuff... well, they
> *would* have come out fine, had you not forgotten that the camera was set at
> ISO 1600!

I bought a more advanced point and shoot and I've taken way too many
pictures in either macro or ISO 800. The next point and shoot will have a
EVF so I can see the settings in bright light.

SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
Anonymous
August 14, 2005 8:07:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 16:07:53 +0000, in rec.photo.digital wes szumera
<wess@sdf.lonestar.org> wrote:


>I bought a more advanced point and shoot and I've taken way too many
>pictures in either macro or ISO 800. The next point and shoot will have a
>EVF so I can see the settings in bright light.

Macro shouldn't have made any difference in your final photo. All the macro
mode does is enable closer focusing, It should change nothing in your final
image unlike higher iso.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 10:48:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.z.invalid> wrote in message
news:ajvmf15fi487jju0a1d7fh4ff7tk1o6vl2@4ax.com...
> Per Lester Wareham:
>>The ISO could realy do with being on the LCD display.
>
> I wonder if that could be accomplished with a firmware upgrade?
>
> Seems like the real question would be how much of what you see in the
> viewfinder
> number-wise is hardware (i.e. dedicated LCDs or whatever) and how much is
> just
> "screen space" that the firmware can draw on as desired.
> --
> PeteCresswell

LCDs normally have a dedicated readout so a firmware hack would need to
displace some other 4 digit numeric info.
!