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Installed new Ram and Graphics card, computer goes to "starting windows" then bl

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November 13, 2012 1:27:26 AM

Hello, I recently installed some new Crucial 2x4 ddr3 1333 mHz ram AND a brand new Sapphire Radeon HD 6670 at the same time (in hind sight, not a good idea). I tried turning on my windows 7 Acer Aspire m3400 or something of the sorts computer, and it brought me to a start menu saying "Problem booting... there was a hardware change... click start normally if there was a power outage during startup...
start windows recovery mode (recommended)
Start windows normally"


Every time I try, it runs through some basic start up stuff, goes to "starting Windows"...

and just stops.

We tried removing the Ram and the graphics card, but nothing.

Tried resetting CMOs, but nothing.


Everything has power (fans turning, lights glowing) but windows really just feels like being a loser.


I enjoy using my computer, any ideas?
November 13, 2012 10:29:31 AM

On the right track removing the components. You tried the recovery option? What is the size of your PSU?
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November 13, 2012 10:41:48 AM

I would say go with the recovery option. Also, keep in mind that you might need to re-activate your Windows installation.
Make sure all the power requirements are met for the graphics, cables inserted, CPU heatsink has not been bumped out of position, etc.
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November 13, 2012 6:07:39 PM

I have a 300w power supply, and as for the recovery option the same thing happens. The screen shows loading files, and the bar goes to the top, the screen changes and freezes with a faint microsoft corporation logo at the bottom.


As for booting in safe mode, after going through the list of files, the screen pauses onto an incredibly trippy black and white bar screen.

A friend suggested plugging in the messed up computer into a different one to see if the hard drive got corrupted in any way, but that still won't be solving any problems.

Im 90% sure everything is in place and I know everything is connected, so that rules that out.


We had these discs labeled "Recovery 1-4" and we tried putting those in for the boot up process by going into the BIOS and such. But Im not fully versed in computer knowledge, and we don't know what those discs were for in the first place so that ended up failure.

My Dad ended up trying some more things and I think he has a few more tricks up his sleeve, but any ideas would be greatly appreciated.


I read somewhere that it could be a motherboard issue, as in we either fried it or cracked it, or something, yet im not sure that applies to my situation directly.


Thanks.
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November 13, 2012 6:19:10 PM

Oh and I just checked the recommended wattage for my Video Card, and it is 400w, which compared to my units 300w (or at least I think is 300w) could have caused a problem, coupled with the fact that the Graphics cards are both 1.5 V.


Could this have done it?
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November 13, 2012 8:58:16 PM

MrzButerzworth said:
Oh and I just checked the recommended wattage for my Video Card, and it is 400w, which compared to my units 300w (or at least I think is 300w) could have caused a problem, coupled with the fact that the Graphics cards are both 1.5 V.


Could this have done it?

That's why I asked if you checked the power requirements. Yes, here is your problem.
You need to upgrade your PSU to support this new configuration. My method: never stick to the minimum recommendations for it, I usually get about double the wattage. Why? Because redundancy never hurts in this (not like the system will start burning all the max wattage anyways, it will just consume what it needs at the moment). Make sure the new PSU fits inside the case (check size specs).
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November 13, 2012 11:43:53 PM

house70 said:
That's why I asked if you checked the power requirements. Yes, here is your problem.
You need to upgrade your PSU to support this new configuration. My method: never stick to the minimum recommendations for it, I usually get about double the wattage. Why? Because redundancy never hurts in this (not like the system will start burning all the max wattage anyways, it will just consume what it needs at the moment). Make sure the new PSU fits inside the case (check size specs).




That sounds like a good plan, but before I go spending a good amount of money on a new power supply, keep in mind that the computer itself still won't start even without the new additions, within its power capabilities. Could it still be causing a problem?
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November 13, 2012 11:55:07 PM

MrzButerzworth said:
That sounds like a good plan, but before I go spending a good amount of money on a new power supply, keep in mind that the computer itself still won't start even without the new additions, within its power capabilities. Could it still be causing a problem?

I suspect the PSU might have been damaged, usually they have some sort of protection, but in case of generic 300W OEM-used PSUs, I would not think so... You could borrow a PSU from a friend and have it hooked up to your system for a quick boot, or you could have your PSU removed and hooked up to another system for a quick check, as well. If it works, then the problem is elsewhere, but I am willing to bet at this point it won't. Let us know, please.
Besides, the system will NEED another PSU, so you'll have to get one if you desire to upgrade. There is no way around getting another PSU, even if the current one still works. What could be the worst case scenario? The mobo is damaged, and that's why the old configuration won't start anymore ( I don't think this is the case at this point, but just for the sake of the argument). Even so, the upgraded system built on a new mobo will still need a new PSU to support it. Correct?
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November 14, 2012 12:11:24 AM

Take a deep breath, get the parts together, and make sure all the cables are plugged in the graphics card has all the power cables plugged in as well (if applicable), the heatsink on the CPU is properly seated and give it a go.
When I upgrade old systems, I usually get combo deals online (like Graphics card+PSU, or RAM), then during the assembly I just take the heatsink off the CPU, apply new thermal paste and re-seat it, just to make sure the old paste (or compound) which is dried up by now, has not cracked in the process. It's almost inevitable to bump the heatsink around a bit, so fresh paste is something I do because it can take a bit of moving without cracking.
That's my routine, and basically for a couple hundred bucks my friends have a perfectly running-better-than-new PCs. Never had a hiccup before with this procedure.
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November 14, 2012 1:45:46 AM

hd6670 normally would work with a 300watt PSU. Try the recovery option from the disks, your win install got corrupt during your shut down.
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November 14, 2012 7:24:49 PM

Okay I Jury rigged in a different computers 305w PSU, and after removing all the new parts to return the computer to its former glory, I proceeded to turn on the computer and the same exact thing happened.
Just thought I would throw out that whenever I try booting in safe mode, it gets hung up on "Storport.sys". I searched the web and found other people had similar problems to mine that as soon as windows started, the computer would crash except the others commonly blue screened and said something like
"IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL" and that "storport.sys" thing error. I saw that a re-installation and a replacement of storport.sys is what it came down to... Im not too familiar with that because my Dad always handled the whole installing and computer fixing.

On a side note, thanks for the help, I have really appreciated it.
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November 14, 2012 9:27:29 PM

OK, a bit of breadboarding is in order now. You need to remove all the un-necessary hardware from your system, leave only one stick of RAM, the system HDD, one graphics card (or leave only the integrated graphics on , if applicable) and restart the installation of your OS from scratch. If still errors, exchange the RAM stick with another one and repeat until you find one configuration that works. Once found, add one component at a time until system is restored to what you need it to be or until the error reappears, meaning you found a faulty hardware. If always getting errors, it could mean the motherboard is damaged and it may need replacing. Let us know.
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November 15, 2012 12:33:59 AM

Ram is under suspicion so start there. Possibly got bumped during install and removal of the other hardware.
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November 18, 2012 4:27:02 PM

Alright, sorry for not replying in a while. We decided that the problem is most likely a software"ish" problem. Our recovery discs we had did have the boot info, but they didn't change anything. So we found online via Acer support that there is a certain form of system recovery secret prompt achieved by pressing Left alt and f10 at a certain menu... but it hasn't been working, leading us to believe that our model is one of the unlucky ones without that installed.

Losing hope. My sister was unable to do her college essays, and I was unable to work on my projects which ended up in bad grades. Everything these days is so technology reliant that a fail is simply catastrophic. Sigh.
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November 18, 2012 5:00:39 PM

Well we had decided it was software, but it turned out it was hardware, so it looks like we have to ship in new parts from Acer, which will take two weeks delivery time. So I guess until then we won't make any progress.
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May 6, 2013 6:43:56 PM

Hey this is really late, but I thought I would let everyone know that we sent the computer to Acer and within that two weeks time they replaced the apparently messed up motherboard and it has worked fine ever since, graphics card, ram, and all. Thank you for the help.
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