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Why Does The Xbox 360's CPU And GPU Does Not Melt?

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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 5:23:34 AM

If the Xbox 360's (Well Consoles) not melt (The Board Overheating Like The RROD) when being played for hours on things like BF3? I would guess that would completly overheat the Xbox 360 maxing out everything for hours with such a cheaply made system.

More about : xbox 360 cpu gpu melt

a c 83 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 5:31:19 AM

because they have a cooling system that is matched to the thermal load, really easy to do in a single case with a single configuration, not so easy to do quietly.
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a c 186 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 5:36:54 AM

13thmonkey said:
because they have a cooling system that is matched to the thermal load, really easy to do in a single case with a single configuration, not so easy to do quietly.

Well, it gets the job done, that's all that matters.

ZE SHEEPLE WILL BUYS.
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a c 106 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 5:55:26 AM

melikepie said:
I would guess that would completly overheat the Xbox 360 maxing out everything for hours with such a cheaply made system.

Hahahaha, because it's not even coming close to "maxing out" anything. It's running at 720p, scaled up if need be, and low/medium settings. The hardware is weak, but the upside to that is it doesn't produce much heat.
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 6:07:53 AM

DarkSable said:
Hahahaha, because it's not even coming close to "maxing out" anything. It's running at 720p, scaled up if need be, and low/medium settings. The hardware is weak, but the upside to that is it doesn't produce much heat.

The game is not maxing out the hardware is.
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a c 117 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 8:16:41 AM

You could ask the same question of laptops. The hardware was designed with a low power draw (therefore low heat output) in mind, and had the capability of dissipating said heat. Either through fans or using the chassis as one massive heat-sink.

Not that they didn't have problems. Early Xbox 360 models red-ringing was a pretty common occurrence due to overheating, where quite literally the back-plate would melt into the CPU. Though you did need to shove it in a fairly unventilated place to achieve that.

Pro Tip: Xbox about to go out of warranty? Wrap it in a towel and leave it running for a bit, when you come back it will be nice and toasty. New Xbox and new warranty!
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 8:19:37 AM

In any case there is nothing wrong with the hardware or the cooling, it was a simple case of Microsoft using a low melting point mix of solder it was lead free. so it melts at a much lower heat threshold. the problem is then because different components expand and contract at diferent rates you get a warping of the mother board so it flexes. Most RROD errors are the cause of the lead free solder on the surface mount of the board melting, then the board flexing back under cooling pulling the Gpu, or Cpu off the board. If they are clever enough with the next Xbox they should fit sockets for the chips, and use better quality solder than being cheap asses.
Oh wait it would be classed as a Pc, no hang on technically it is a a pc.
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 9:38:49 PM

manofchalk said:
You could ask the same question of laptops. The hardware was designed with a low power draw (therefore low heat output) in mind, and had the capability of dissipating said heat. Either through fans or using the chassis as one massive heat-sink.

Not that they didn't have problems. Early Xbox 360 models red-ringing was a pretty common occurrence due to overheating, where quite literally the back-plate would melt into the CPU. Though you did need to shove it in a fairly unventilated place to achieve that.

Pro Tip: Xbox about to go out of warranty? Wrap it in a towel and leave it running for a bit, when you come back it will be nice and toasty. New Xbox and new warranty!

Yah, the case with the whole baking the graphics card thing except your baking the whole system! Who doesn't want a baked xbox 360 in the morning!
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 9:41:08 PM

Why doesn't your calculator melt if you compute pi to the power of 300?
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 9:42:54 PM

esrever said:
Why doesn't your calculator melt if you compute pi to the power of 300?

I don't think the battery can output enough power to melt anything in it.
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 9:45:56 PM

try plugging it into a wall outlet.
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a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 9:48:57 PM

esrever said:
try plugging it into a wall outlet.

In that case it wouldn't die calculating, it would die as soon as you plug it in :) .
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a c 480 à CPUs
November 15, 2012 12:05:46 AM

What's the purpose of this thread?
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a b à CPUs
November 15, 2012 12:45:10 AM

jaguarskx said:
What's the purpose of this thread?

To make you ask that.
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a b à CPUs
December 8, 2012 6:50:45 AM

Best answer selected by melikepie.
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