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How often should one buy cpus for best price performance over time

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Anonymous
November 14, 2012 3:16:49 PM

Hello,
I've been cracking my head around this but since I'm not very good at math maybe some who is can answer this question: for the best price/performance over time how often should one buy cpus, it seems to me the performance of cpus goes up buy 20-25%/year, so considering that how does one calculate how often should one buy them? even better would be if one took in to the equation the price at which one could sell the 2nd hand cpus when we buy the new ones. I think they devalue at about 25%/year within the warranty period and 20%/year after.
a c 159 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 3:22:00 PM

A new video card may be a better investment, but you'll have to list your system specs, budget, and some favorite activities such as games for some recommendations. Another rule of thumb is to replace the cpu when the board fails if it's been more than two years. I also change out the power supply if it smells bad.
a c 122 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 3:37:05 PM

CPU performance has been going up closer to 10-15%/year for the past six years or so. It has slowed down a lot from the ~50%/year before Y2000.

As for how often to replace for best performance per buck, I would say as infrequently as possible. Most people these days could stretch their PCs to 4-5 years if they wanted to without sacrificing much. Every year that you delay a new purchase gives you a lot more bang-per-buck than the few bucks you might earn selling your old PC/CPU more often.

So the frequency is really all about how much of a loss you are willing to take to stay more up to date. I personally do not care about staying up-to-date so I only upgrade when I run into brick walls such as maxed-out RAM.
a c 188 à CPUs
November 14, 2012 3:43:03 PM

I look to replace my processor and board about every 3 years on my home PC. Heck I make a habit of slowly upgrading components on my computer as budget and time permit so video card, PSU, RAM, HDD, SSD, board and processor.
November 14, 2012 3:55:02 PM

I do every other year. My upgrade cycle is simple.

Spring - I usually get motherbaord, processor, and ram. (I will sometimes cheap out on ram as the prices on ram seem to drop during the summer)

Summer - I look for more ram, maybe hard drives.

Fall - new video cards release either fall or spring, it generally drops the prices, not to mention SOME back to school sales are GENUINELY sales. Cases/power supplies, since I am not shelling out for processor, motherboard, or ram.

Winter - Black friday is good for picking up external hard drives on the cheap. The WD passport units are almost always on sale then. ONe year, people bought them like CRAZY because WD ran out of drives and started putting the Caviar Black drives in the passports and mybooks.

Then I will generally wait a year, unless a need arises.

Whatever you do, when buying, DO YOUR HOMEWORK. Look for the best price to performance ratio. If people are saying "this is the fastest thing there is right now" - that does not mean its worth what you are paying for it. The Extreme Edition chips that Intel sells are probably sick, but I still wouldn't shell out a grand for a processor to game with.
a b à CPUs
November 14, 2012 4:18:33 PM

I usually only update my CPU/motherboard when I reach a point that they can no longer perform the way I want with the newest games. As long as I can max my games and maintain 60+ fps there is no real need to updated. I can't be on the bleeding edge anymore so I just try to be above the curve the best I can.
Anonymous
November 15, 2012 11:44:31 AM

InvalidError said:
CPU performance has been going up closer to 10-15%/year for the past six years or so. It has slowed down a lot from the ~50%/year before Y2000.

As for how often to replace for best performance per buck, I would say as infrequently as possible. Most people these days could stretch their PCs to 4-5 years if they wanted to without sacrificing much. Every year that you delay a new purchase gives you a lot more bang-per-buck than the few bucks you might earn selling your old PC/CPU more often.

So the frequency is really all about how much of a loss you are willing to take to stay more up to date. I personally do not care about staying up-to-date so I only upgrade when I run into brick walls such as maxed-out RAM.


Thx you're pretty much right. I've cracked my head some more and I believe I've found a solution. I made a spreadsheet that calculates for several scenarios, anyone can view and download:
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0Bwte8bI4LpiddjhESElEcX...
hope it's understandable enough.
basically how much the increase in performance is and the value of the used CPU defines how often one should upgrade. But of course one should consider that one probably needs to upgrade the mobo (+ ram to make use of better CPU); so one should just count in the buy/sell price of those things.
this can apply for any other thing that is upgradeable and who's increase in performance is quantifiable.
any comments are welcome (specially if you find something incorrect :) )
allthebest :) 
a b à CPUs
November 15, 2012 12:12:58 PM

o1die said:
A new video card may be a better investment, but you'll have to list your system specs, budget, and some favorite activities such as games for some recommendations. Another rule of thumb is to replace the cpu when the board fails if it's been more than two years.


Yep, considering that both AMD and Intel now change sockets pretty frequently, older ones may be harder to get except on ebay..

Quote:
I also change out the power supply if it smells bad.


I know a few people who follow the same philosophy, except with their underpants :p ..
a c 473 à CPUs
November 15, 2012 11:39:56 PM

I upgrade when I want more performance and if the performance increase that I am getting is worth the price I am paying. My Q9450 has been chugging along since 2008. I will either upgrade next year when Haswell is released or in 2014 when Broadwell is released.
!