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Interested in building my own gaming pc.

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July 6, 2012 11:03:47 AM

I am interested in building my own gaming pc, I have a max budget of $1,000. I am not 100% computer savvy, I would obviously watch and learn ALOT more before actually building the PC, but for now I was wondering if you guys could provide some suggestions for me.

My main goal is to be able to play most of today's games on max settings at a decent fps or even 60. The main games I play are League of Legends, SC2, etc. Intel or AMD, either one is fine with me. I am planning on running dual monitors eventually, and I have a monitor already, as well as a keyboard and mouse.

I obviously would like to stay around the $750-900 range. But again max is $1,000.

So if you guys could suggest some basic things such as; motherboard, processor, gfx, etc. I just don't really no where to start I suppose.
July 6, 2012 2:02:57 PM

I'd fill in the form that batuchka has linked...however, just to give you some general info:

The first thing is to decide whether to go AMD or Intel. AMD used to be the choice for budget builds, and Intel for more expensive / long-lasting systems. However, relatively recently Intel became the manufacturer of choice for CPUs across all market areas, so I'd recommend going there. AMD isn't bad, but the bang-for-buck performance from them isn't as it was, and when compared against budget Intel offerings it's hard to recommend AMD, IMHO. The best CPU from Intel for gaming would be the i5-3750K, and you'd want a Z77-based motherboard for that. Good motherboard vendors are MSI, Asus and Gigabyte (there are others, too, but those are 3 of the big hitters). The 'K' on the CPU number indicates an unlocked multiplier, meaning you can overclock the CPU...something you may or may not be interested in. It's relatively easy these days to hit 4.5GHz, but make sure you use aftermarket cooling and not the stock heatsink.

The most important part for your gaming system is the GPU. For your budget, you'll want to look at something like the AMD 7950 series. Nvidia are still to release their corresponding 6xx series mid-range GPUs, although if you could stretch to it get a GTX 670. This is where the main juggling act comes in...you could get a dual-core CPU instead of a quad-core, and put the extra cash into a better GPU. Since the motherboard you'd get would be S1155, you'd be able to upgrade to a quad-core later on, if you decided to do make this trade-off.

RAM...4GB is fine for a gaming system, although 8GB would be better for longevity.

Storage...any HDD is fine (Seagate or Western Digital). You could also get an SSD for a boot drive, and a HDD for storing games and movies etc. Thoroughly recommend an SSD; my system cold-boots extremely quickly with mine.

PSU...always, always, always get a good brand (XFX, Seasonic, Corsair, Enermax, Be Quiet!, Silverstone). This is probably the most important component. I did have a decent PSU on my system which unfortunately popped and took my motherboard with it (I'm not naming the brand, as it was just bad luck). If you get what's called a generic PSU (eg. 750W for $20) then you're sitting on a time-bomb. It's also good to suss out what you plan to do with the system later on...do you think you'll go with dual-GPUs? Then get a more powerful PSU to accommodate a future increase in power requirements.

Lastly, the chassis...a good case will have decent airflow and good cable management, not to mention other features like screwless installation and quick-release HDD mounts. Check out Silverstone, Fractal Design and Corsair as a starter.

And have fun! It'd be good to watch a Youtube clip or two before you start your build, but it is good fun. Just take your time, and enjoy the process. Oh, and do it on a table, not a carpet...
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July 6, 2012 2:09:00 PM

Thank you for all that info!

And as for the rest;


Approximate Purchase Date: (1-2 weeks)

Budget Range: (700-1000)

System Usage (Gaming)

Parts Not Required: (Monitor, Mouse, Keyboard)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: (Newegg, tigerdirect)

Country: (USA) we need to know where these parts are being assembled

Parts Preferences: Don't have one.

Overclocking: Always an option

SLI or Crossfire: Not Sure

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

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July 6, 2012 2:43:09 PM
July 6, 2012 2:53:05 PM

I'd get 2x2GB, not 1x4GB for RAM...you need to run it in pairs.

GPU isn't the most recent, but is still good...another $70 and you can get the 448-core 560Ti, which is a solid performer.

However, other than the RAM, it's a good build. Just bear in mind that the 6870 may not allow you to play on max settings in every game.
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