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Computer randomly shutting down.

Last response: in Systems
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July 6, 2012 4:08:15 PM

Hello, my computer will at times randomly shut down, just like someone would pull the out the power from it. It often happens about 5 - 10 minutes after the computer has been on, sometimes often when turning on the computer the monitor while just display their is "no signal" and I have to restart the computer. I have checked if it could be a heat related problem, which is was not, the computers temp is 40 - 60 while being idle. Although the fans have been sounding quite odd lately. I have also done a disk clean up, scanned for malware and tried to repair it with the Windows repair tool. The computer will shut down while being in BIOS too. What could be the problem?
July 6, 2012 4:09:15 PM

I also use a stationary macine and the OS is Windows 7.
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July 6, 2012 4:38:32 PM

How old is the machine? When was the last time you opened the case and used a can of compressed air to hose off the components/heatsinks/fans?

Have you had a power surge recently? Power supply could be marginal and small things are tripping the safety system.
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July 6, 2012 4:55:41 PM

No, I have not had a power surge recently. I don't know how old the computer is, it was used when I got it, although it was quite new and could run all the latest games on highest graphics. I think I got it 2009 or 2010. I am have not opend the can ever and used a can of compressed air.
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July 6, 2012 5:16:56 PM

Cleaning out the case needs to be accomplished monthly, or quarterly at worst case. If you have pets or a dusty environment more often.

It may not *appear* to be a heat problem but you could have a very clogged power supply and that temp is rarely seen. Just get a can of air and clean out the case as a starting point.
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July 6, 2012 5:18:04 PM

Thank you, I shall try that.
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July 6, 2012 5:27:22 PM

If that doesn't do it, report back with your full system specs, including the brand and model (not just wattage) of the PSU.
If the PSU is overheating, monitors in the PC won't tell you that.

Edit: While you have it open for cleaning, look over the motherboard carefully for swollen or leaking capacitors. Google "bad capacitors" for some images; they're not hard to spot. Once again, the brand and model of your PSU will be important, because it could have the capacitor problem as well (e.g. if it's an old Antec Smartpower).
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July 6, 2012 5:36:15 PM

Be extra carefull around the power supply. If you put a flashlight to it and it's clogged with debris then don't screw around with it. Just get a new one.

also

post what is going on in your event viewer. That really helps.
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July 6, 2012 5:42:47 PM

True, don't open the PSU; there's a reason why some primary caps are rated for 400V.
Shutdowns may not produce any events, but it's still worth checking.
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July 6, 2012 6:25:14 PM

I thank you all for your most friendly advice, I shall begin cleaning it as soon as I am able too.
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July 8, 2012 12:16:50 AM

I have not yet been able to clean the computer yet, but I tested to start the computer and it began smelling really odd, and it shortly turned off.
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July 8, 2012 4:31:22 AM

I would not turn it on again until you've cleaned it. If an overheating PSU is wandering out of spec, it could damage your system.
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July 8, 2012 8:04:03 AM

Smelling oddly can also be an indicator that your PSU has gone bad, whether its full of dust or not. If it was me, I'd just replace it once it started to smell, rather than let it risk damaging any of the components in the computer.
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July 8, 2012 9:22:04 PM

So my step-father decided to clean my computer with a vacuum cleaner dispite my advice not to do so, and it turned out that a smaller fan had popped out of position and was laying down on the can floor. But it all wen't right for one day untill I tried to play a more graphic demanding game, and it crasched, although I did not spot any bad capacitators.
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July 8, 2012 9:22:28 PM

The computer shutdown that is.*
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July 8, 2012 10:18:00 PM

A smaller fan...where did it belong?
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July 9, 2012 12:45:26 AM

Uh, yeah - what did the fan come off of? And yes using a normal vacuum cleaner on a pc is not a good idea due to the static that builds up from air flowing over the hose intake.
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July 17, 2012 11:17:35 AM

Although I am far from a computer expert when it comes to hardware it seems to be the fan for the GPU, the fan is loose or constantly falling of lately and when I took a SpeedFan test it said that my GPU is 114 C when being idle. I reckon I have to replace the fan.
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July 17, 2012 12:24:11 PM

Hejligan said:
Although I am far from a computer expert when it comes to hardware it seems to be the fan for the GPU, the fan is loose or constantly falling of lately and when I took a SpeedFan test it said that my GPU is 114 C when being idle. I reckon I have to replace the fan.


lol yes. At that temp the part will fail shortly, don't use your PC again until the fan is reattached. You need to use THERMAL COMPOUND when you re-attach. Try this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


plenty of videos on youtube showing how to apply.

Run a monitor like HWMONITOR from CPUID (makers of cpuz) occasionally to see temps. it's free.

There's a chance the graphics card is already toasted, if so the fail will continue until you replace card. Here is a video card ref: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...
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August 9, 2012 8:27:11 PM

Welp, I am just going to buy a new computer.
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!