DIY Power Supply Unit

Does anyone have any tutorials on homemade computer PSU?

NOTE: Will not be using on computer. For educational use only. No one held responsible on anything.
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  1. Building a SMPS for PCs is not much different from building one for anything else so all you need is a good book on SMPS design in general or whichever topology you wish to use if you have already decided that.

    The simplest way to go about it would be to build a 12V PSU first and then add DC-DC converters to step that down to 3.3V and 5V.
  2. InvalidError said:
    Building a SMPS for PCs is not much different from building one for anything else so all you need is a good book on SMPS design in general or whichever topology you wish to use if you have already decided that.

    The simplest way to go about it would be to build a 12V PSU first and then add DC-DC converters to step that down to 3.3V and 5V.

    Thank You for your input.

    Do you recommend any literature concerning SMPS?

    I am not familiar with topology. What would that be?
  3. dogman_1234 said:
    Thank You for your input.

    Do you recommend any literature concerning SMPS?

    I am not familiar with topology. What would that be?



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply
  4. One place to start would be a book like "Switching Power Supply Design" published by McGraw-Hill. I got the 2nd edition in my bookshelf but there probably is a 3rd or 4th edition by now. That book goes through design steps for nearly everything for every common topology at the time of publication. Complete with equations, diagrams, wafevorms, design examples, etc.

    The topology is the general operating principle and component arrangement. Common types used in AC-DC converters include flyback, half-bridge, full-bridge and resonnant. Some designs are "current-fed", others are "voltage-fed". In current-fed topologies, the transformer driver switches have fixed 50% duty-cycle and output regulation is done by modulating the current using a buck regulator in front of the transformer. In voltage-fed topologies, the transformer is wired to the HVDC source and the pulse width is modulated to adjust output power. Voltage-fed designs are simpler but have a tendency to self-destruct because slight imbalances in how the transformer goes through its hysteresis loop tend to make it creep slowly towards saturation and when it gets there, it behaves almost like a short-circuit which will usually destroys the switching transistors.

    Lots of interesting stuff in there if you like power electronics.
  5. I remember screwing up my first full bridge rectifier. Glad I didn't touch it, cause it exploded. lol. Be careful if this is your first foray into electronics.
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